Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Se está descargando tu SlideShare. ×
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Próximo SlideShare
Amazon as an Employer.pptx
Amazon as an Employer.pptx
Cargando en…3
×

Eche un vistazo a continuación

1 de 13 Anuncio
Anuncio

Más Contenido Relacionado

Más reciente (20)

Anuncio

OD Models.pptx

  1. 1. OD MODELS GROUP 2
  2. 2. 17030121010 KUNTAL CHAKRABORTY 17030121044 SIDDHARTHA SACHAR 17030121055 RIMJHIM SHRIVASTAVA 17030121151 NIKUNJ PARAGKUMAR JHA 17030121200 NITIKA DUBEY MEMBERS
  3. 3. OD Models Edgar Schein (1980) 01 Kilmann (1974) 02 Porras & Robertson (1992) 03 Nadler (1980s) 04 Burke & Litwin (1992) 05 06 Trist & Emery (1965)
  4. 4. The Emery-Trist Model/Levels of Organisational Environments (1965) The Emery-Trist levels of organizational environments include four main organizational types: • The placid, randomized env: refers to the most simple form of organizational environment in which resources, goals, and values are distributed random and remain unchanging. • The placid, clustered env: refers to the semi-complex form of organizational environment in which resources, goals, and values are unchanging and located in clusters.
  5. 5. • The disturbed, reactive environment: refers to scenarios in which multiple social systems dominate the same environments, and the social systems are dependent on one another. • The turbulent field env: refers to chaotic scenarios in which there are no clear cause and effect relationships between the organizational system and its environment. The Emery-Trist Model/Levels of Organisational Environments (1965)
  6. 6. Thomas Kilmann Conflict Management Model (1974) The five modes of responding to conflict, according to this Model: • Avoiding: This means you take an unassertive and uncooperative approach to the conflict and don't deal with it. • Accommodating: This might take the form of selfless generosity or charity, giving in to another person's orders when you would prefer not to, or yielding to another's point of view.
  7. 7. • Competing: It means standing up for your rights, defending a position which you believe is correct, or simply trying to beat the other side. • Compromising: The Compromising option is at the centre of the model because it is both assertive and cooperative but only to some extent. Both sides get something but not everything. • Collaborating: Collaborating requires developed conflict resolution skills based on mutual respect, a willingness to listen to others, and creativity in finding solutions. Thomas Kilmann Conflict Management Model (1974)
  8. 8. Edgar Schein model of organization culture (1980) Artifacts Values Assumed values The first level is the characteristics of the organization which can be easily viewed, heard and felt by individuals collectively known as artifacts. The dress code of the employees, office furniture, facilities, behavior of the employees, mission and vision of the organization The values of the individuals working in the organization play an important role in deciding the organization culture. The thought process and attitude of employees have deep impact on the culture of any particular organization. The inner aspects of human nature come under the third level of organization culture. Organizations, where female workers dominate their male counterparts, do not believe in late sittings as females are not very comfortable with such kind of culture.
  9. 9. The Nadler-Tushman Congruence Model (1980s)
  10. 10. Burke-Litwin Organizational Change Framework (1992)
  11. 11. Porras and Robertson Model (1992) Porras & Robertson outline four types of organizational change based on the category of change (planned or unplanned) and its order (first or second).
  12. 12. • Planned change originates with a decision made by the organization itself with the deliberate purpose of improving its functioning. Planned change is typically initiated to respond to new external demands imposed upon the organization. • Unplanned change is change that originates outside of the organizational system and to which the organization must respond. It is spontaneous, evolutionary, fortuitous, or accidental. • First-order change, linear and continuous in nature, involves alterations in system characteristics without any shift in the basic paradigm used by the system to guide its functioning. • Second-order change is a multi-dimensional, multilevel, qualitative, discontinuous, radical organizational change involving a paradigmatic shift Porras and Robertson Model (1992)
  13. 13. Thank You

×