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MANAGEMENT SUMMARY CHAPTER 01.docx

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MANAGEMENT SUMMARY CHAPTER 01.docx

  1. 1. MANAGEMENT SUMMARY CHAPTER 01 1.1 Managers and where do they work? MANAGERS: Someone who coordinates and oversees the work of other people so organizational goals can be achieved. Coordinating the work of a departmental group or supervising. Where do managers work? Organization: A deliberate arrangement of people to accomplish specific purpose.
  2. 2. 1.2 WHY MANAGERS ARE IMPORTANT? QUESTION NO 02: WHY ARE MANAGERS IMPORTANT TO ORGANIZATIONS, WHAT ARE THEIR KEY RESPONSIBILITES IN AN ORGANIZATION? 1. ORGANIZATIONS NEED THEIR MANAGERIAL SKILLS AND ABILITIES As organizations deal with today’s challenges as changing workforce dynamics, the worldwide economic climate, changing technology and ever increasing globalization hence they play an important role in identifying critical issues and crafting responses 2. MANAGERS ARE CRITICAL TO GETTING THINGS DONE These managers deal with all kinds of issues as the company’s myriad tasks are carried out. They create and coordinate the workplace environment and work systems so that others can perform those tasks. They find reasons and bring work and tasks on track back if there is an issue. 3. Matter Single most important variable in an employee productivity and loyalty isn’t pay/benefits or environment it’s the quality of relationship between employee and other direct supervisors
  3. 3. And. study states that managerial ability was important in creating organizational value. Managers can provide leadership to their teams, providing a purpose and direction that employees can trust. They help employees reach their goals and handle the daily production and processes of a business. They also plan the next steps for managing projects and potential hires What are the five key responsibilities of a manager? At the most fundamental level, management is a discipline that consists of a set of five general functions: planning, organizing, staffing, leading and controlling 1.3 WHATDO MANAGERS DO? Q 01- What are 3 main roles performed by a manager?
  4. 4. MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS: At the most fundamental level, management is a discipline that consists of a set of five general functions: planning,organizing,staffing,leading and controlling Planning: Management function that involves setting goals establishing strategies for achieving those goals and developing plans to integrate and coordinate activities Organizing: Management function that involves arranging and structuring work to accomplish the organizational goals Leading: Management function that involves working with and going through people to accomplish organizational goals Controlling: Management function that involves monitoring, comparing and correcting work performance.
  5. 5. MINTZBERG MANAGERIAL ROLES AND CONTEMPORARY MODEL OF MANAGING: QUESTION 03- INTRODUCTION: Henry Mintzberg, a well-known management researcher studied actual managers at work and concluded: Managerial Role: Refers to specific actions or behaviors expected or exhibited by the managers Managerial role that involves: Interpersonal roles: People and subordinates that are ceremonial and symbolic in nature Informational roles: collecting, receiving and disseminating information. Decisional roles: Revolves around making choices and decisions. Mintzberg proposed that manager activities included both reflection (thinking) and action (doing) CONCLUSION: Managers regardless of the type of organization and level in organization perform similar roles. However emphasis he gives changes according to his level . The classical functions provide clear and discrete methods of classifying the thousands of activities managers carry out and the technique they use in terms of the functions they perform for the achievement of goals, however his approach and additional model of managing do offer us other insights into managers work.
  6. 6. Management Skills: UPS, company that understands importance of management skills Robert Katz proposed that managers need 3 critical skills in managing. Technical skills: Job-specific knowledge and techniques needed proficiently perform work tasks Interpersonal skills: Ability to work well with other people both individually and in group. Conceptual skills: Skills managers use to think and conceptualize about abstract and complex situations. Using these skills managers are able to understand relationships among various subunits and visualize how organization fits into broader environment. Managers then effectively direct employees work
  7. 7.  FOCUS ON CUSTOMER  FOCUS ON SOCIAL MEDIA  FOCUS ON TECHNOLOGY  FOCUS ON INNOVATION  FOCUS ON SUSTAINAILITY  FOCUS ON EMPLOYEE COMPETITIVE EDGE COMPETITION OF FOOD, SERVICE AND CONCEPT FOCUS ON CUSTOMER: 2 Strategies – Create what is demanded or Market it in a way to make a demand of it FOCUS ON TECHNOLOGY: Better service (Updated room service) Food technology as food processing or order taking by robotic technology FOCUS ON SOCIAL MEDIA FOCUS ON INNOVATION: Business growth by marketing, Operations and HR by Training and development
  8. 8. And surveys to make it even better FOCUS ON SUSTAINABILITY: Sustainability: To perform a task without any harm to the environment FOCUS ON EMPLOYEE: Customer oriented organization as balance between work and social life to achieve goals Employee focused as observe and identify their weak points for training sessions. “SATISFY THOSE WHO SATISY YOUR CUSTOMERS” INTRODUCTION: Management has long been associated with the five basic functions: planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. These default dimensions are sufficient when pursuing a fixed target in a stable landscape. But take away the stability of the landscape, and one needs to start thinking about the fluidity of the target. This is what’s happening today, and managers must move away from the friendly confines of these five tasks. To help organizations meet today’s challenges, managers must move from: directive to instructive, restrictive to expansive, exclusive to inclusive, repetitive to Mini Directive to instructive: When robots driven by artificial intelligence (AI) do more tasks like finish construction or help legal professionals more efficiently manage invoices, there will be no need for a supervisor to direct people doing such work. This is already happening in many industries — workers are being replaced with robots, especially for work that is more manual than mental, more repetitive than creative.
  9. 9. What will be needed from managers is to think differently about the future in order to shape the impact AI will have on their industry. This means spending more time exploring the implications of AI, helping others extend their own frontiers of knowledge, and learning through experimentation to develop new practices. Learning, not knowledge, will power organizations into the future; and the central champion of learning should be the manager. Restrictive to expansive: Too many managers micromanage. They don’t delegate or let direct reports make decisions, and they needlessly monitor other people’s work. This tendency restricts employees’ ability to develop their thinking and decision making — exactly what is needed to help organizations remain competitive. Managers today need to draw out everyone’s best thinking. This means encouraging people to learn about competitors old and new, and to think about the ways in which the marketplace is unfolding. Exclusive to inclusive: Too many managers believe they are smart enough to make all the decisions without the aid of anyone else. To them, the proverbial buck always stops at their desks. Yet, it has been our experience that when facing new situations, the best managers create leadership circles, or groups of peers from across the firm, to gain more perspective about problems and solutions. Managers need to be bringing a diverse set of thinking styles to bear on the challenges they face. Truly breakaway thinking gets its spark from the playful experimentation of many people exchanging their views, integrating their experiences, and imagining different futures. Repetitive to innovative: Managers often encourage predictability — they want things nailed down, systems in place, and existing performance measures high. That way, the operation can be fully justifiable, one that runs the same way year in and out. The problem with this mode is it leads managers to focus only on what they know — on perpetuating the status quo — at the expense of what is possible. Organizations need managers to think much more about innovating beyond the status quo – and not just in the face of challenges. Idris Mootee, CEO of Idea Couture Inc., could not have said it better: “When a company is expanding, when a manager starts saying ‘our firm is doing great’, or when a business is featured on the cover of a
  10. 10. national magazine – that’s when it’s time to start thinking. When companies are under the gun and things are falling apart, it is not hard to find compelling reasons to change. Companies need to learn that their successes should not distract them from innovation. The best time to innovate is all the time.” Problem solver to challenger: Solving problems is never a substitute for growing a business. Many managers have told us that their number one job is “putting out fires,” fixing the problems that have naturally arisen from operating the business. We don’t think that should be the only job of today’s manager. Rather, the role calls for finding better ways to operate the firm — by challenging people to discover new and better ways to grow, and by reimagining the best of what’s been done before. This requires practicing more reflection — to understand what challenges to pursue, and how one tends to think about and respond to those challenges. Employer to entrepreneur: Many jobs devolve into trying to please one’s supervisor. The emphasis on customers, competitors, innovations, marketplace trends, and organizational performance morphs too easily into what the manager wants done today — and how he or she wants it done. Anyone who has worked for “a boss” probably knows the feeling. The job of a manager must be permanently recast from an employer to an entrepreneur. Being entrepreneurial is a mode of thinking, one that can help us see things we normally overlook and do things we normally avoid. Thinking like an entrepreneur simply means to expand your perception and increase your action — both of which are important for finding new gateways for development. And this would make organizations more future facing — more vibrant, alert, playful — and open to the perpetual novelty it brings
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