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Meter Data Management 2.0

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Meter Data Management 2.0

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The fact that a Meter Data Management (MDM) system is the single, secure repository for the millions of data points collected by an AMI makes it the logical solution for data analytics such as validation, editing and estimation that improve the accuracy of billing information. Yet, as a single-source system of record, the MDM also is the starting point for integration of meter-read data with other enterprise systems to improve real-time efficiency of network operations and business processes.
The MDM with meter modelling components and standardized connectivity can integrate with the utility geodatabase (GIS) and outage management system (OMS) to significantly streamline outage detection and restoration verification.
MDM integrated with the utility supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system or distribution management system (DMS) allows comparison of information at substation/net-stations with aggregated meter data to detect potential theft or network loss during distribution. Similar aggregate comparison helps analyse power quality, identify demand trending and forecast demand. These network analysis capabilities empower accurate asset planning and the utility’s ability to meet demand without adding more capacity.
In all of these enterprise-level functions, MDM integration with the GIS provides valuable visualization that facilitates operator and analyst identification of areas of concern or opportunity.
The real-time network intelligence possible with such a powerful MDM solution can return substantial benefits to several utility operations and business processes — well beyond the initial-level billing accuracy improvement.

The fact that a Meter Data Management (MDM) system is the single, secure repository for the millions of data points collected by an AMI makes it the logical solution for data analytics such as validation, editing and estimation that improve the accuracy of billing information. Yet, as a single-source system of record, the MDM also is the starting point for integration of meter-read data with other enterprise systems to improve real-time efficiency of network operations and business processes.
The MDM with meter modelling components and standardized connectivity can integrate with the utility geodatabase (GIS) and outage management system (OMS) to significantly streamline outage detection and restoration verification.
MDM integrated with the utility supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system or distribution management system (DMS) allows comparison of information at substation/net-stations with aggregated meter data to detect potential theft or network loss during distribution. Similar aggregate comparison helps analyse power quality, identify demand trending and forecast demand. These network analysis capabilities empower accurate asset planning and the utility’s ability to meet demand without adding more capacity.
In all of these enterprise-level functions, MDM integration with the GIS provides valuable visualization that facilitates operator and analyst identification of areas of concern or opportunity.
The real-time network intelligence possible with such a powerful MDM solution can return substantial benefits to several utility operations and business processes — well beyond the initial-level billing accuracy improvement.

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Meter Data Management 2.0

  1. 1. Meter Data Management 2.0 New levels of enterprise integration and analytics to improve utility business operation July 2012 Make the most of your energy SM
  2. 2. Summary Executive Summary . ................................................................................... p 1 Introduction ................................................................................................. p 2 Start with data storage and analytics ........................................................... p 4 Integration across the enterprise .................................................................. p 5 Work Management....................................................................................... p 6 Outage Management. .................................................................................. p 7 . Operational and business network losses .................................................... p 8 Load profiling and planning........................................................................... p 9 Visualization . ............................................................................................... p 10 Conclusion................................................................................................... p 11
  3. 3. Leveraging AMI for Outage Management Executive summary The fact that a Meter Data Management (MDM) system is the single, secure repository for the millions of data points collected by an AMI makes it the logical solution for data analytics such as validation, editing and estimation that improve the accuracy of billing information. Yet, as a single-source system of record, the MDM also is the starting point for integration of meter-read data with other enterprise systems to improve real-time efficiency of network operations and business processes. The MDM with meter modeling components and standardized connectivity can integrate with the utility geodatabase (GIS) and outage management system (OMS) to significantly streamline outage detection and restoration verification. MDM integrated with the utility supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system or distribution management system (DMS) allows comparison of information at substation/net-stations with aggregated meter data to detect potential theft or network loss during distribution. Similar aggregate comparison helps analyze power quality, identify demand trending and forecast demand. These network analysis capabilities empower accurate asset planning and the utility’s ability to meet demand without adding more capacity. In all of these enterprise-level functions, MDM integration with the GIS provides valuable visualization that facilitates operator and analyst identification of areas of concern or opportunity. The real-time network intelligence possible with such a powerful MDM solution can return substantial benefits to several utility operations and business processes — well beyond the initial-level billing accuracy improvement. White paper | 01
  4. 4. Leveraging AMI for Outage Management Introduction According to the “2012 Smart Grid Executive Survey” from Zpryme Research and Consulting, more than 52 million smart meters will be installed in the United States by the end of 2012, signaling an industry-wide expansion of the advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). Already, smart meters are feeding hundreds of thousands of readings per day to utilities, providing critical data in near real-time. To enable the utility to cope with the sheer numbers of data points flowing in, and then effectively use this data, every AMI has a Meter Data Management (MDM) system that serves as a central information depot. These powerful solutions perform critical Validation, Estimation, and Editing (VEE) functions before sending data on to the utility’s CIS. These VEE functions ensure the accuracy and timeliness of billing and have been the primary purpose of MDM systems for some time. However, the data generated by the AMI and processed by the MDM provides a wealth of information that utilities can put to work in real time, beyond accurate billing. This information provides the entire enterprise, even customers themselves, insight into energy consumption patterns. Powerful analytic calculation engines integrated with the MDM system can develop trends and insights that can be hugely beneficial in future infrastructure or distribution planning. Yet, often this valuable information is left on the table and not exploited to improve distribution management and consumer options — and to help the utility move forward toward its Smart Grid goals. In this paper, we discuss how innovative MDM solutions can integrate with utility enterprise systems to offer a new doorway to better business and operational improvements. White paper | 02
  5. 5. Meter Data Management 2.0
  6. 6. Meter Data Management 2.0 Start with data storage and analytics Consider the amount of data your AMI generates, even with 250,000 meters, each reading two data values (e.g. kw, and kwh) four times an hour: this AMI produces at least 2 million data values an hour, 48 million a day and 17,520 million a year. A core feature to extracting the most value from the AMI is a single, secure database where the millions of data points being collected from multiple sources can be stored and integrated. The MDM data collection application automatically identifies meters, configures data points and can measure consumption at different time intervals to support time-based variable rates. It also can collect different reading types, such as kwh, kw and power quality. With the single database, the MDM system with highly precise VEE functions can draw from historical data to check data integrity; identify missing readings, invalid meter multipliers and meter tampering; and replace any missing data with accurate estimates. Configurable rules can specify which validations/ estimations to apply and how to apply them. This flexible framework creates custom validations that support specific workflows. For example, if the system gets a full day’s worth of data, and some data points are missing in the middle, it can either interpolate the data, look at consumption data for a similar day for that customer, or look at average consumption data for this customer type — such as single family apartment — for that day, to replace the missing data with an accurate estimate. Alternatively, the MDM system can issue automatic re-read requests when missing data cannot be estimated. White paper | 04
  7. 7. Meter Data Management 2.0 Integration across the enterprise MDM provides not only a single-source system of record for meter-read data, but also a point of integration of that data with other enterprise systems; see Figure 1. The MDM system with meter modeling components and standardized connectivity can integrate with the utility geodatabase (GIS), distribution management system (DMS), supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system and outage management system (OMS) to support identification of network outages, losses, overloading, theft and load forecasts. Visual Displays G G G G Business Gateway: Incoming Data & Queries CIS CIS Business Gateway: Outgoing Notifications Desktop Smart Client Web Thin Client MDM Main Components WMS OMS Data Aggregation Reporting Engine Rate Structures Verification, Estimation Meter Modeling and Editing Distributed Real-time Data Collection … … Real-time Database Smart Connector Collection SCADA/ DMS G G … DA Smart Connector Smart Connector Smart Connector G G G Figure 1. The Telvent Conductor MDM shares AMI data with key business and operational applications in real time, to improve efficiency and support decision making across the enterprise. White paper | 05
  8. 8. Meter Data Management 2.0 Work management The ability of the MDM system to identify meters exhibiting abnormal performance enables the initiation of appropriate action. In the instance when the MDM cannot estimate missing data based on defined parameters or analytics results, as described above, integration with a Work Management System (WMS) can trigger the necessary workflow for the meter involved. For example, a work order could be issued if a meter indicates a roll back status, has an isolated outage, has a specific type of firmware or has shown to fail under specific operating conditions (last gasp +outside temperature +spike check). White paper | 06
  9. 9. Meter Data Management 2.0 Outage Management With near-real-time readings coming in from meters, MDM systems quickly identify meters that are returning ‘last gasp’ messages, signaling a potential power outage. An OMS with enhanced processing power and advanced prediction algorithms, integrated with the MDM, will accurately identify the outage event and rapidly determine the scope. The MDM system also can contribute event notifications from non-meter devices higher on the network. The OMS can prioritize those events and rapidly identify related downstream locations — all to implement faster response and restoration. The MDM system also helps in verifying outage status and optimizing restoration efficiency by actively pinging meters to determine their power status. This capability helps the utility prevent over-prediction of outages and identify nested outages during restoration, providing specific information to field restoration crews and reducing additional trips into the field. White paper | 07
  10. 10. Meter Data Management 2.0 Operational and business network losses With readings automatically collected on a regular basis, in real time, AMI and MDM implementation also MDM integrated with an Advanced DMS (ADMS) supports operational excellence eliminates truck rolls into the field for everyday meter through: readings. • ower quality and network analysis — P However, those meter technicians also provided a voltage and current information from monthly field inspection of each meter while collecting strategic nodes helps improve state the reading, imparting the first line of defense estimation. against meter alteration for theft purposes. Without in-person monthly inspections, that defense might • emand-side management — more D be greatly reduced. New MDM systems fill this void intelligent data helps the utility grow without with built-in analysis tools that can compare real- adding more capacity. time data to historical trends from the same meter or similar customers. This analysis can identify patterns that suggest theft or tampering, and automatically generate a work report for the revenue department and field teams to investigate. In addition, the integration of the MDM system with SCADA or DMS allows aggregate comparisons of energy supply and demand load, helping to identify potential theft or network loss. For example, the MDM system can aggregate usage data from all the meters tied to a specific feeder and compare those figures to the power delivered to that feeder. Aggregated usage figures that are significantly less can signal the utility of potential theft or network loss during transmission. White paper | 08
  11. 11. Meter Data Management 2.0 Load profiling and planning Similar aggregate comparison can assist utilities in analyzing the network and planning for the near and long term. This capability can be highly valuable for utilities facing the challenges of increasing energy demands and a more complex energy generation distribution. MDM systems create advanced network load projections by leveraging the meter-read database to identify demand trending and forecast demand during key periods, such as peak load or storm situations. With this information, utilities can manage peak loads and plan for increasing energy demands more effectively, reduce the need to add generation capacity and take advantage of distributed sources of renewable energy generation. By integrating MDM systems with DMS solutions and accurate weather feeds, utilities can optimize the performance of existing networks and achieve key environmental and business goals. Similar benefits can be seen on a smaller scale, by aggregating the data from individual meters to determine the load on transformers and higher level devices and identifying equipment that should be replaced in order to optimize asset performance. For example, existing residential infrastructure might become ineffective with the introduction of electric vehicles. MDM can identify for utilities where load demand has exceeded rated capacity, allowing the utility to replace the device before a more expensive and disruptive event, such as a blown transformer, occurs. White paper | 09
  12. 12. Meter Data Management 2.0 Visualization All of these enterprise businesses gain tremendous The tools described above, available with an value through the visualization enabled by the advanced MDM solution, help the utility extract the integration of the MDM and the GIS database, which true return on investment from AMI implementation, provides a clear display of network information, data providing highly valuable intelligence that enables a and AMI deployment; see Figure 2. During power better understanding of the network and its real- outage situations, this display allows controllers time behavior. As more and more utilities realize to view the size and scope of the outage. A visual MDM capabilities beyond simple meter-to-cash identification of geographic areas at high risk for theft functionality, the industry can expect they will can help the utility manage business loss. integrate MDM across all operational enterprises to help achieve a smarter network grid. Figure 2. The visualization enabled by the integration of the MDM and the GIS database can assist controllers by spatially displaying areas of projected concern or opportunity. White paper | 010
  13. 13. Meter Data Management 2.0 Conclusion With the rich repository of network intelligence possible with MDM, utilities can squeeze every network performance benefit possible from their AMI initiative: • fficiency and cost savings are realized with system interoperability, reduced IT E costs, reduction of peak demand, and optimized forecasting of demand. • ervice reliability increases through a more efficient distribution network, S management of peak loads without additional generation capacity, and improved outage management. • he utility is better able to extend the network with renewable sources and T achieve GHG emissions goals. White paper | 11
  14. 14. ©2012 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved. Schneider Electric USA, Inc. 4701 Royal Vista Circle Fort Collins, CO 80528 Phone: -866-537-1091 1 + (34) 9-17-14-70-02 Fax: 1-970-223-5577 www.schneider-electric.com/us June 2012

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