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ATD 2017 Play Games to Learn Game Design

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ATD 2017 Play Games to Learn Game Design

  1. 1. About Us Sharon Boller Game-lover, learner, author, instructional designer, game designer, dog-lover, Mom, wife, cyclist, gardener, hiker, reader, founder and president, Bottom-Line Performance. Bottom-Line Performance 2 Karl Kapp Video game player/designer, perpetual student, professor, husband, father…author of books and Lynda.com courses, professor of instructional technology at Bloomsburg University
  2. 2. A game is… • An activity with an explicit goal or challenge • Rules for players and the system (computer games) • Interactivity with other players, the game environment (or both) • Feedback mechanisms that provides players with clear cues on how they are performing. • It results in a quantifiable outcome (you win, you lose, you hit the target, etc.) and often triggers an emotional reaction in players.
  3. 3. What’s required to learn and remember Bottom-Line Performance 4 Motivation Relevant Practice Specific, Timely Feedback Spacing & Repetition Story Ability to retrieve Mental involvement (aka “engagement” Memory builders
  4. 4. How games help learning & remembering Bottom-Line Performance 5 Motivation and emotion: Game goals, challenges, competition (against time, the game itself, other teams), reward structures Relevant practice: Connection between in-game challenge & on-the-job need, linkage between game rules and real-world constraints and environmental factors, reward structures that mirror real-world, levels w/in game, game loops Timely, specific feedback: Consequence of choices on game progress and status, comparison to performance of other players or game system; “Game loop” itself also supplies feedback as players experiment with different strategies and observe results. Spaced repetition: Levels, replayability Story: Theme, narrative and characters (Note: not every game has story)
  5. 5. We’ve designed lots of games… Bottom-Line Performance 6
  6. 6. We’ve designed lots of games… Bottom-Line Performance 7
  7. 7. We’ve designed lots of games… Bottom-Line Performance 8
  8. 8. We’ve designed lots of games… Bottom-Line Performance 9
  9. 9. We’ve designed lots of games… Bottom-Line Performance 10
  10. 10. Experience with these games helped us design these… Bottom-Line Performance 11 TE Town (available on iOS and Google Play)
  11. 11. Bottom-Line Performance 12 Experience with these games helped us design these…
  12. 12. Bottom-Line Performance 13 Experience with these games helped us design these…
  13. 13. Bottom-Line Performance 14 Experience with these games helped us design these…
  14. 14. Bottom-Line Performance 15 Experience with these games helped us design these…
  15. 15. You learn game design by playing games! Bottom-Line Performance 16 It all starts HERE!
  16. 16. 3 games we’ll play 1. Quiplash – social, improv-casual, large group 2. Timeline – tabletop, card-based (modified for large group play) 3. Lie Swatter – party, large group Bottom-Line Performance 17
  17. 17. Play: Quiplash 1. Game type: Improv-style/social-casual, large-group 2. Game goal: Score the most points by getting people to vote for your “quip.” To Start: • Six volunteers with mobile phones. • Up to 100 audience participation folks. • If selected to play or participate, go to jackbox.tv and enter code we provide. Bottom-Line Performance 18
  18. 18. Evaluate: Quiplash 1. What was the game goal? Was it fun? 2. What was the core dynamic? (Race to finish, territory acquisition, matching, escape, etc.) Was it fun? 3. What were 1-3 mechanics (rules) that stood out? Did they help – or confuse you? 4. What game elements did you notice? (i.e. aesthetics, cooperation, competition, theme, rewards, time, chance, strategy, levels, etc.) 5. How did you know how you were doing? (What feedback did you get?) Bottom-Line Performance 19
  19. 19. Brainstorm: What’s re-usable? (5 min.) Q1: How you use elements from this game to create a different learning game? • Elements you can pull: Game challenge, short timeframes for play, aesthetics, scoring strategy (two components to a score), combination of drawing w/ words, etc., multiplayer format, etc. Q2: How you could use a version of this game in a VILT or as a tabletop game of some sort. Ideas? Bottom-Line Performance 20
  20. 20. Play: Timeline 1. Game type: tabletop game/card game 2. Game goal: Work collaboratively at your tables to create the longest possible correct timeline given the cards you have. 3. To get started: 1. Place a card with the date face-up in center of table where all can see it. 2. Distribute remaining cards face down to the people at your table. DO NOT LOOK AT DATES!!!!!! Bottom-Line Performance 21
  21. 21. How to play 1. As a team, evaluate one card at a time and decide where to place it onto the timeline. Once placed, turn card face up to reveal the date. 2. If card placement is correct, card remains. If not, discard it. 3. Select another card and repeat the process. 4. As you use additional cards, your team can 1) insert them between two cards already placed on the timeline; or 2) place the card left or right of the other cards. 5. Game ends after 5 minutes. Bottom-Line Performance 22
  22. 22. An Example Wrong! ‘Remove Card
  23. 23. Scoring Bottom-Line Performance 24 Cards on Timeline Achievement 10 Time Immortus 9 Time Traveler 8 Time Impaired 7 or less No sense of time
  24. 24. Evaluate: Timeline 1. What was the game goal? Was it fun? 2. What was the core dynamic? Was it fun? Examples: Race to finish, territory acquisition, matching, escape, etc. 3. What were 1-3 mechanics (rules) that stood out? Did they help – or confuse you? 4. What game elements did you notice? Examples: aesthetics, cooperation, competition, theme, rewards, time, chance, strategy, levels, etc. 5. How did you know how you were doing? (What feedback did you get?) Bottom-Line Performance 25
  25. 25. Brainstorm: What’s re-usable? (5 min.) Q1: How you use elements from this game to create a different learning game? • Elements you can pull: Game challenge (alignment), card game type, increasing difficulty, use of images, scoring, rules, etc.) Q2: How you could repackage this game in a VILT or as an eLearning game of some sort. Ideas? Bottom-Line Performance 26
  26. 26. Adjusting games to suit needs Bottom-Line Performance 27 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCe7ySOq4A0
  27. 27. Example of re-use… Knowledge Guru – Sales to Implementation Process: • 4 roles, 28-steps in process from start of conversation through support of product • GREAT re-use of concept from Timeline Bottom-Line Performance 28
  28. 28. Play: Lie Swatter 1. Game type: Party/Trivial Game 2. Game goal: Score the most points by figuring out the lies. 1. 100 player limit: Go to Jackbox.tv 2. Enter in 4-digit room code & follow directions. Bottom-Line Performance 29
  29. 29. Evaluate: Lie Swatter 1. What was the game goal? Was it fun? 2. What was the core dynamic? Was it fun? 3. What were 1-3 mechanics (rules) that stood out? Did they help – or confuse you? 4. What game elements did you notice? 5. How did you know how you were doing? (What feedback did you get?) Bottom-Line Performance 30
  30. 30. Brainstorm: What’s re-usable? (5 min.) Q1: How you use elements from this game to create a different learning game? Q2: How you could repackage this game in another format—VILT, tabletop game, or as an asynchronous eLearning game of some sort? Bottom-Line Performance 31
  31. 31. Example of Tools for Audience-based Interactive Games…. UMU--https://www.umu.com/ Poll Everywhere--https://www.polleverywhere.com/ TurningPoint--https://www.turningtechnologies.com/turningpoint Kahoot!--https://getkahoot.com/ (little more K-12 focused) Nearpod--https://nearpod.com/ (little more K-12 focused) Bottom-Line Performance 32
  32. 32. Resource to help you… Bottom-Line Performance 33 https://www.td.org/Publications /Books/Play-to-Learn
  33. 33. Book signing opp: immediately following this presentation inATD Store Bottom-Line Performance 34 Sharon Boller President Bottom-Line Performance, Inc. Sharon@bottomlineperformance.com @Sharon_Boller (Twitter) Karl Kapp Professor Bloomsburg University karlkapp@gmail.com @kkapp (Twitter)

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