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Play to Learn: Effective Learning Game Design

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Play to Learn: Effective Learning Game Design

  1. 1. Play to Learn: Effective Game Design
  2. 2. About me Game-lover, learner, instructional designer, game designer, book author, blogger, dog-lover and owner, empty-nester (!), wife, cyclist, president of Bottom-Line Performance. Sharon Boller Neatest new games played: “And Then They Held Hands” (designed for 2 ppl) and Star Wars game on HTC Vive.
  3. 3. Define game & gamification Play Games and learn the lingo of games Best practices to follow; pitfalls to avoid. Break Play Learning Games! Learning + Game Lunch Game Design Guru – Q&A Create your own learning games: paper prototyping Playtest w/ your team Playtest w/ another team Share what you learned; wrap up B r e a k
  4. 4. Game Goal Align the cards into the specified sequence within 90 seconds. Let’s play a game: Sequence
  5. 5. Set up and Rules Bottom-Line Performance 5 • Deal out the cards to every other person in your row. The person who starts the deal is Person #1. • Hand out all cards, giving some people two cards if necessary. • Make sure cards make it all the way to other end of row. This might mean leaving TWO spaces between card holders.
  6. 6. Set up and Rules Bottom-Line Performance 6 • You have 90 seconds to re-arrange the cards or yourselves so the words on the cards match the order they appear on your handout/the slide I’m about to show. Discard cards that do not belong. • For your team to win, Person #1 should hold the first card on the list. The rest should be held by Persons 2 – 14 in the row. Person #15 should have all discards. Everyone else’s hands should be empty. • Card holders may NOT talk. Nonverbal cues are allowed.
  7. 7. Bottom-Line Performance 7 Correct Sequence 1. Activity 2. Explicit 3. Goal 4. Challenge 5. Rules 6. Players 7. Interactivity 8. Players 9. Game Environment 10. Feedback Mechanisms 11. Clear cues 12. Performing 13. Quantifiable outcome 14. Emotional reaction 30 60 90
  8. 8. Bottom-Line Performance 8 A game is… • An activity with an explicit goal or challenge • Rules for players and the system (computer games) • Interactivity with other players, the game environment (or both) • Feedback mechanisms that provides players with clear cues on how they are performing. • It results in a quantifiable outcome (you win, you lose, you hit the target, etc.) and often triggers an emotional reaction in players.
  9. 9. Game Goal Stay in business and minimize costs. Align the cards while using the least amount of $$ and time to accomplish the task. Turning this into a learning game…
  10. 10. Rules to Know Bottom-Line Performance 10 • Each row is a business. Your business is working on an essential project. Each 30 seconds used costs your business $300,000. 30 seconds = 1 month. • The person in the left-most chair is the project manager. • Each person in your row contributes $10,000 to this cost. • Finish the task within 2 minutes and earn a bonus for each team member. • If you need more time at 2 minutes, the PM must eliminate at least two jobs. • If you are not successful within 4 minutes, your company goes bankrupt.
  11. 11. What about gamification? Using game elements in a non-game situation. • Frequent flyer programs and other customer loyalty programs • Summer reading programs • Social Media (likes, rankings, etc.)
  12. 12. Basic Game Lingo Game goal – what player(s) have to do to win. No goal. No game. Core Dynamic what game play is about; what you have to do to win. Pick a dynamic to design around; it’s easier to get started that way. Mechanics rules for players; rules for system. Rules define how people achieve the goal. Don’t make too hard or too easy. Game Elements Features that help immerse you in game play Tinkering with one feature can entirely change play experience
  13. 13. Activity #1: Play/Evaluate Timeline 1. Work in your table group. 2. Play Timeline for 10-15 minutes. 3. Use worksheet on Page 9 to evaluate game.
  14. 14. Summary – Timeline Evaluation 1. What was the game goal? Was it fun? 2. What was the core dynamic? Was it fun? 3. What were 1-3 mechanics (rules) that stood out? Did they help – or confuse you? 4. What game elements did you notice? 5. How did you know how you were doing? (What feedback did you get?)
  15. 15. Turning this into a learning game 28-step in process from start of conversation through support of product 4 roles – GREAT re- use of concept from Timeline
  16. 16. Activity #2: Play/Evaluate Spot It 1. Work in your table groups. 2. Play Spot It for 10-15 minutes. 3. Use worksheet on Page 10 in workbook to evaluate game.
  17. 17. Evaluate Spot It 1. What was the game goal? Was it fun? 2. What was the core dynamic? Was it fun? 3. What were 1-3 mechanics (rules) that stood out? Did they help – or confuse you? 4. What game elements did you notice? 5. How did you know how you were doing? (What feedback did you get?)
  18. 18. Activity #3: Plants v Zombies 1. Access game from your mobile device (tablet or phone.. 2. Play game for 10 minutes.
  19. 19. Evaluate Plants vs Zombies 1. What was the game goal? Was it fun? 2. What was the core dynamic? Was it fun? 3. What were 1-3 mechanics (rules) that stood out? Did they help – or confuse you? 4. What game elements did you notice? 5. How did you know how you were doing? (What feedback did you get?)
  20. 20. Define game & gamification Play Games and learn the lingo of games Best practices to follow; pitfalls to avoid. Break Play Learning Games! Learning + Game Lunch Game Design Guru – Q&A Create your own learning games: paper prototyping Playtest w/ your team Playtest w/ another team Share what you learned; wrap up B r e a k
  21. 21. Resource for You • Pages 12 – 19 cover a TON of material. We’ll highlight as we play learning games next.
  22. 22. Main Take-Aways • Game goal ≠learning goal: you need BOTH. • Before creating game, you: – Define instructional goal AND objectives; keep in focus as you design the game to achieve them. • Audience matters. • As you design the game, you want learning rationale for these things: – Choice of game mechanics (rules) – Game elements to include/exclude – Rewards/scoring
  23. 23. Play Password Blaster http://www.bottomlineperformance.com/passwordblaster Worksheet page 17
  24. 24. Play/Evaluate Password Blaster 1. What was the game goal? Was it fun? 2. What was the learning goal? Did you learn? 3. Did you notice a core dynamic? Was it fun? 4. What were 1-3 mechanics (rules) that stood out? Did they help – or confuse you? 5. What game elements did you notice? 6. How did you know how you were doing? (What feedback did you get?) http://www.bottomlineperformance.com/passwordblaster
  25. 25. Case Study: Feed the World 1. Game Goal: Work together to feed an ever-increasing world population, achieving production goals each year. 2. Learning Goal: reinforce all the safety steps and environmental protection steps taught during the previous 3.5 days of a NEO workshop.
  26. 26. Game play consists of four “rounds” with 7 turns to a round. Each round equates to 1 year of time. # of people to feed each year increases to match real-world increases. The 7 turns mimic the 7 steps of mine to market process. Play complexity increases in final two rounds.
  27. 27. Resource Cards – Total of 8 resources you can use on each turn. Most turns require 1-2. Inspector Cards– Reflect “chance” – and can help or hurt your performance. You draw Inspector cards if the Inspector symbol comes up on a die roll.
  28. 28. Scenario Cards – Drawn on every turn. Player reads scenario aloud and 1) chooses the appropriate resource(s) to handle the scenario, 2) describe specifics of how resource(s) get used. After responding, player hands card to teammate on his or her right. That player flips the card and reads the correct response. Correct responses let team earn a phosphate toward the goal.
  29. 29. Learning + Game 1. Company mission linked to game goal. 2. Progress through game mirrored real-world process of going from mine to table. 3. Learning goal is to get players to match on-the-job resources to real- world scenarios they will encounter and to correctly identify appropriate use of resources. Game elements matched this. 4. Game element being collected (phosphate) is what the players actually mine. 5. Game board illustrated 7-step process. 6. Ever-increasing # of people to feed mirrors real-world statistic. 7. Chance cards reflected good/bad things that really happen on the job. 8. Mining inspections incorporated as “chance” element as well.
  30. 30. Case Study: TE Town 1. Business goal: increase parts sold per customer. 2. Game Goal: Build a metropolis, maximizing population and treasury as you do. 3. Learning Goal: sales reps will recognize the broad range of products that can be sold within a single customer type and link relevant product families to a variety of applications and technologies within specific customer types.
  31. 31. Learning + Game 1. In the game, players earn treasury dollars as they succeed in selling products. 2. Success in the game (population growth, treasury growth, ability to buy assets) result of success in achieving learning objectives. 3. In the game – as in the real-world selling context – players must use resources to figure out which technologies and product families to sell. 4. Players need to know customer types and associated product applications “cold.” Game is designed to encourage replay/repetition to support this.
  32. 32. Learning + Game 5. Game design mirrors real-world constraint of limited time for game play/learning. Designed for play in short, 5-minute bursts. 6. Replay is a big part of this game. Players are incented to do it because they need treasury to buy assets for their town. To maximize treasury, they need population. The games that grow their population are ones that include content they need to know “cold.”
  33. 33. Define game & gamification Play Games and learn the lingo of games Best practices to follow; pitfalls to avoid. Break Play Learning Games! Learning + Game Lunch Game Design Guru – Q&A Create your own learning games: paper prototyping Playtest #1; team debrief Revise; Playtest #2 and team debrief Share what you learned; wrap up D a y 2
  34. 34. Best PracticesDesign the learning game to meet specific instructional objectives. Embed the learning game into a curriculum.Keep rules, scoring and leveling simple. Get learners comfortable with the rules and game play before they start.Do not focus the game on “winning” only.
  35. 35. Best PracticesCreate the game so learners work in groups. Make the game interactive. Plan for replayability. The cognitive activities in the game should match the cognitive activities on-the-job.Determine metrics ahead of time. Winning should be primarily a result of knowledge acquisition or creation.
  36. 36. Skipping Playtesting. Pitfalls Undertaking this process without playing games. Skipping the pilot. Trying to teach everything. Focusing only on fun.
  37. 37. Game Design Guru game 1. Create Guru account and game login: – kguru.co/ATDGameDesignGuru/ 2. Play through first four levels within World A.
  38. 38. Define game & gamification Play Games and learn the lingo of games Best practices to follow; pitfalls to avoid. Break Play Learning Games! Learning + Game Lunch Game Design Guru – Q&A Create your own learning games: paper prototyping Playtest #1; team debrief Revise; Playtest #2 and team debrief Share what you learned; wrap up D a y 2
  39. 39. Dump ADDIE; go agile instead (iterative) Playtest. Playtest. Did I say playtest?
  40. 40. Prototyping…what IS it? • Visuals are probably better than words here. • http://www.yo utube.com/wa tch?v=k- nfWQLmlMk
  41. 41. Prototype example
  42. 42. Prototype example
  43. 43. Prototype Example
  44. 44. What can you learn from a paper prototype: • How effective your game is at helping people learn what you want them to learn. • How engaging the game will be to learners. Do you have a “fun enough” game goal and is your core dynamic one that keeps people interested? • How effective the game elements are that you are using. Do the elements support your learning experience or detract from it? • How clear the rules are AND how they affect the fun and the learning. • The cognitive load on the learner – too high, too low, just right? • How complex the game might be to produce (w/out the expense of producing it before you find out!!)
  45. 45. How do you create one? • Paper • Scissors • Crayons or markers • Tape
  46. 46. Activity: Learning Game Design Your Task • As a team, create and playtest a learning game. The Process (page 20 in workbook) • Use game topic & content provided on page 21. • Decide on a core dynamic from list provided. • Determine a theme and a game goal. • Decide cooperative or competitive. • Create a paper prototype, defining game mechanics (aka rules) as you go. • Playtest in your group. Worksheet on page 22 is where you document game design/rules, etc.
  47. 47. The External Playtest Use Guidelines on page 24: • Do game goal and learning goals complement one another? • Were we engaged throughout game play? • Are our rules at right complexity level for our audience and the training situation? • Do our game mechanics and game elements support real-world context? • Are our rules clear?
  48. 48. Make Decisions! What do you need to revise? • Review your feedback. • Identify the biggest things you learned – and would modify on next iteration.
  49. 49. Resource to help you…. https://www.td.org/Publications/Books/Play-to-Learn
  50. 50. Biggest learning you took from today about designing learning games? Ways to reach me: Sharon@bottomlineperformance.com @Sharon_Boller (Twitter)
  51. 51. Q. What tools are out there to develop games or to gamify learning? Can I use rapid authoring tools?
  52. 52. Programming background NOT required, though helpful. Medium complexity to use; lots of support available. Amazing quality; no 3D, though. Rapidly growing in usage; strong user community. Construct2 games CAN be imported into authoring tools such as Articulate Storyline or Lectora. Example: www.bottomlineperformance.com/passwordbl aster Construct2 HTML5 game creator by Scirra
  53. 53. Unity https://unity3d.com/unity Complex to use Typically used for highly immersive experiences, simulations. Very, very powerful in terms of what it can do. Can be 2D or 3D Users tend to have programming background or expertise Unity
  54. 54. No experience with this tool, but platform and company look very intriguing. SaaS – pricing starts at $5,500 US dollars for 1-year subscription. Designed specifically FOR eLearning. Genie Game-Based Authoring Tool
  55. 55. Of course I think it’s great SaaS – pricing starts at $3,999 for one- year subscription. Authors can export SCORM packages for upload onto LMS or run on web. Designed for corporate learning audiences. http://www.thekno wledgeguru.com Knowledge Guru
  56. 56. IMO, suboptimal for a bona-fide game but absolutely can be used to create nice gamified experiences. https://community.articulate.com /articles/elearning-games-recap Articulate Storyline
  57. 57. This Storyline project has several gamification elements in it: aesthetics, challenges, time constraints on some activities, Total time invested in creating it was about 50 hours. Nothing other than Storyline was involved in its creation. Rapid authoring example - gamification
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