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1.2 Untangling complex issues: using scaling to support and measure the impact of helping conversations

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1.2 Untangling complex issues: using scaling to support and measure the impact of helping conversations

  1. 1. Untangling complex issues Using scaling to support and measure the impact of helping conversations Solent Learning and Teaching Community Conference Workshop: 24 June 2016 David Whistance Employability and Enterprise Programme Adviser david.whistance@solent.ac.uk Employability and Enterprise | http://about.me/ssugetajob
  2. 2. Today’s workshop Background (10 minutes) • Two videos o Careers guidance pilot project o Scaling walk through: student case study Practical (30 minutes) • Work in pairs • Open forum
  3. 3. A bit of interdisciplinary mingling ‘All psychotherapies are methods of learning.’ Corsini (2008, 6) Counselling Careers guidance Learning & teaching
  4. 4. Underpinning theories Scaling: Its roots in solution focussed brief therapy e.g. Berg and de Shazer (1993) Evaluation: Integration into sessions can make helping more effective e.g. Miller et al (2004) Techniques: Strongly influenced by relational and client factors e.g. Egan (2013) and Lambert et al (1986)
  5. 5. How and why: Careers guidance project https://youtu.be/kdCJ6AHcWPg Pilot at Southampton Solent University explored in Whistance (2014)
  6. 6. Walk through: Student case study https://youtu.be/Uqi3FjDf2jw
  7. 7. A trust-based reflection space? This is a complex issue where you both invest considerable time and effort Explore Rate Issue: Before and after Conversation: Usefulness Explore What makes you X not Y? What do you need to do to move up 1 point? I’m interested... I’m surprised...
  8. 8. Practice Scaling Helping foundations Topic In pairs (15ish minutes) 4 mins: Explore issue 2 mins: Scaling Swap roles and repeat 3 mins: Debrief Enjoyable but some complexity / confusion • My all expenses paid, dream holiday • My interview with an historical figure Listen as actively and deeply as you can Gentle nudges to facilitate exploration Name issue (facilitatee’s words) Scale issue: Before and after Rate usefulness Qualitative quotes: Reflect back / seek out
  9. 9. Your experiences
  10. 10. Previous workshop “This is freaking me out! What if I ask a student about the usefulness of what we’ve done and they give a low score. How awkward is that!” • Yes, this is a difficult situation. However, it is also an opportunity to re-engage with exploring the student’s issue. Remember this approach prioritises having meaningful, learning-filled encounters over getting high evaluation scores. “I can see how this works in your setting but I don’t think it would meet our needs.” • This is one evaluation and facilitating tool. As you say, it may not be right for you. • There are some situations where it’s not useful. For example, if there has been some really straightforward information giving or signposting that has clearly met a student’s needs, using this approach would be complete overkill. “What if people do the scaling in different ways? How valid would it be?” • There may be issues about the psychometrics. It would be good to explore this. • One of the things that makes us think this approach has reasonable face validity is that a small but significant proportion of students say that their interaction has been really useful and this sometimes surprises us quite a lot. Maybe this is an indicator that the approach helps to calibrate our expectations or interpretations of what the helping process is like for people.
  11. 11. Georgia’s experience “Would you like to say anything about the scaling process?” “What about the usefulness question?” “Did the scaling process seem a bolt on exercise?” “Is there anything else you’d like to say?” “If I’d done a questionnaire you probably wouldn’t know why I gave the scores I did.” “No, until you contacted me to talk about my helping out at the workshop, I thought it was just a normal part of a careers appointment. It just felt normal and natural.” “I quite liked this as it showed me you were concerned with how I had found our session.” “Helped with my goal setting. I knew what I needed to do but was confused. I had a feeling of where I was and this became clearer as we talked about it more. Yes, it made things clearer for me.”
  12. 12. What would you need to do to move from X to X+1? What makes you X rather than Y? I’m… Surprised… Interested… Confused… Complex issues Some trust established Reflection space Summary
  13. 13. References Berg, I.K. and de Shazer, S., 1993. Making numbers talk: Language in therapy. In Friedman, S. (Ed.), The New Language of Change: Constructive Collaboration in Psychotherapy. New York: Guildford Press. Corsini, R.J. and Wedding, D., 2008. Current Psychotherapies. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole. Egan, G., 2013. The Skilled Helper: A Problem-Management and Opportunity-Development Approach to Helping (10th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole. Lambert, M.J., Shapiro D.A. and Bergin, A.E., 1986. The effectiveness of psychotherapy. In Garfield, S.L. and Bergin, A.E. (Eds.), Handbook of Psychotherapy and Behaviour Change (3rd ed., 157-212). New York: Wiley. Miller, S.D., Duncan, B.L. and Hubble, M.A., 2004. Beyond integration: The triumph of outcome over process in clinical practice. Psychotherapy in Australia, 10(2), 2-19. Available from: www.scottdmiller.com/wp-content/uploads/documents/BeyondIntegration.pdf Whistance, D., 2014. Guidance by numbers: A student-centred approach to evaluating the impact of careers guidance. Phoenix, October, 22-23. Available from: http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/e830b7ab#/e830b7ab/24
  14. 14. Part of your learning and teaching toolkit? ‘Making numbers talk’ Berg and de Shazer (1993)

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