Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.

[Srijan Wednesday Webinars] How to Deal with Emergencies in a Lean/Scrum Team

641 visualizaciones

Publicado el

Every Agile team’s dream of achieving sustainable pace comes with nightmares of production emergencies, defects, support and maintenance tasks within a sprint which takes the focus completely off the sprint goals. In this webinar, our speaker walks you through different approaches that teams can take to absorb a reasonable amount of uncertainty, and to strike a balance between robustness and speed within the sprint. We will see how engineering teams can alter their approach when a product is in "Pivot" phase and has to go through a course correction in terms of vision, market segment and features.

You can watch the full webinar recording here: https://youtu.be/l4z-tZ8l-mQ

Publicado en: Tecnología
  • ★★ How Long Does She Want You to Last? ★★ A recent study proved that the average man lasts just 2-5 minutes in bed (during intercourse). The study also showed that many women need at least 7-10 minutes of intercourse to reach "The Big O" - and, worse still... 30% of women never get there during intercourse. Clearly, most men are NOT fulfilling there women's needs in bed. Now, as I've said many times - how long you can last is no guarantee of being a GREAT LOVER. But, not being able to last 20, 30 minutes or more, is definitely a sign that you're not going to "set your woman's world on fire" between the sheets. Question is: "What can you do to last longer?" Well, one of the best recommendations I can give you today is to read THIS report. In it, you'll discover a detailed guide to an Ancient Taoist Thrusting Technique that can help any man to last much longer in bed. I can vouch 100% for the technique because my husband has been using it for years :) Here's the link to the report ➤➤ https://tinyurl.com/rockhardxxx
       Responder 
    ¿Estás seguro?    No
    Tu mensaje aparecerá aquí

[Srijan Wednesday Webinars] How to Deal with Emergencies in a Lean/Scrum Team

  1. 1. How to Deal with Emergencies on a Lean/ Scrum Team Mr. Avienaash Shiralige @agilebuddha Blog: www.agilebuddha.com Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com
  2. 2. Copyrights Protected - AgileBuddha Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com ! • I have 18+ years experience in IT Product & Service companies in various leadership roles ! • Agile Transformation Consultant,Trainer and Agile Coach ! • I share my opinions and experiences of applying Agile and Lean thinking in transforming organizations on my blog: http:// www.agilebuddha.com ! • Consulting clients in Australia, Europe, US and India ! • Developer,Tester, Dev Manager, Product Owner, BU head, Director..... ! • No-schooling my daughter, Organic Farming, Natural Birthing, NoVaccinations etc are my interest ! • I live in Goa, India Me - Avienaash Shiralige - Founder, Writer - Agile Buddha
  3. 3. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Problem Context • Traditional waterfall projects • Development team never had to deal with maintenance - had a separate team to handle this • Maintenance team had to deal with the non-sense developers created - “Developer had all the fun without hangover afterwards” • Agile projects • Teams start delivering early and often • Maintenance/Enhancements starts post couple of sprints • Planning becomes hard for the upcoming sprints
  4. 4. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com The Problem • Production incidents and other unplanned mayhem consume team’s time and hence team unable to achieve sprint goal
  5. 5. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com The Goal To absorb a reasonable amount of uncertainty, striking balance between robustness and speed.
  6. 6. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Approach 1 - Perform Triage - And Reject • Is this a real production emergency? Many times they are not. Examples of non-incidents: • Sales team coming with “the deal of the century” • Stakeholders upgrading normal requests to production emergencies in an attempt to bypass backlog negotiation •There may be a genuine need, but that does not make it classify under production emergency
  7. 7. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Strong Product Owner • Is this is a genuine production request? Fix it. • More often issues require very strong triage and hence strong, decisive PO who can convince stakeholders You can always wait for 2 weeks to get a new feature.
  8. 8. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Approach 2 - Perform Triage - And Defer Fix Until Next Sprint • Some issues are there in the system for a long time, but when they are found, needs a immediate fix • Such issues can be pushed to later sprints and having short sprint duration can be very useful in such negotiation • If you can defer the problem to the next sprint, then team will pick it up as per regular process • Next to the decision of reject, a good PO will make sure everything that can be deferred will be Deferred.
  9. 9. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Approach 3 - Reserve a Buffer To Deal With Unexpected Issues • If you have done Solution 1 and 2, whatever left are real issues that have to be fixed ASAP. • Reserve a buffer of points or time for unplanned work • Start with 80% capacity - planned work and 20% - unplanned emergency work
  10. 10. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Buffer Rules: • If buffer is more than 1/5 of velocity, then it will leave big gap in the capacity planning. Keep it small. • Buffer is NOT for backlog items • Buffer needs to be protected from unintended use(Stakeholder smell a workaround in the regular process). So perform good triage! • Buffer overflow/underflow: Measure how much buffer is used to plan upcoming sprints/releases
  11. 11. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Approach 4: Fix Root Causes, Improve Quality • Solution 1/2/3 are in logical order to control damage • Fix issues so they stay fixed, build-in quality so that you don’t have emergencies at all! • If you overflow your unplanned emergencies buffer, then you have no business in continuing the sprint. Abort Sprint! • Instead, use the sprint to fix the root cause
  12. 12. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Tip: Size The Team Right • Small team performs better as it has less overheads, but it is less robust against losing members • 10 person team losing 1 person is 10% productivity loss • 3 person team losing 1 person is 33% loss! • Sweet spot is 7-9 people - Small enough to absorb overhead, large enough to absorb some loss
  13. 13. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Approach 5 - Swap Not Started Items •Apply MoSCoW principle • Include all “must haves” and some “should haves” in a sprint • Hence “should haves” become your buffer • PO decides if emergency is more or less important than a “should have” • Swap with not started similar size item
  14. 14. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Approach 6: Consider Using Kanban • If team is doing more maintenance than new features, then Kanban • Scrum Board - long term features • Kanban board - short term changes, maintenance, support etc.
  15. 15. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Conclusion •All these tricks are dependent on context • Have a broad range of options to chose from • If it is a large team working on the product, then you can try to break them into • Scrum team - Working on strategic long term features • Kanban team - Working on tactical short-term changes
  16. 16. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Product is in Pivot - Business Emergency • Product has to go through a course correction in terms of vision, market segment and features • Product team must be very good with product discovery •Ability to-do as many iterations of idea as possible before you run out of money or patience •The challenge lies in figuring out who cares about your incredible new product Few famous business pivots - Twitter, Flickr, Groupon, Nokia, Star Bucks, HP, Instagram http://www.forbes.com/sites/jasonnazar/2013/10/08/14-famous- business-pivots/
  17. 17. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Lean Start-up: Build - Measure - Learn The primary measure of progress during discovery isn’t delivery velocity, it’s learning velocity. When you’re doing discovery right, it could look a little like this team at the Nordstrom Innovation Lab.
  18. 18. Content Copyrights Owned By Agile Buddha - www.agilebuddha.com Product is in Pivot - Engineering Impact • Engineering teams also need to make course corrections to deal with this uncertainty • Stop developing new features without validating markets • Prototype new ideas with quick turn-around • Sometimes building more demo-able Over shippable features • Prefer “speed Over perfection” in engineering • Engineering teams need to re-look at few practices like •Automating tests for new features • Hard coding Over building generic solutions/frameworks • Product lacks roadmap during this stage. Hence moving to short sprints or to Flow model like Kanban helps reduce Build-Measure-Learn feedback loop.
  19. 19. Mr. Avienaash Shiralige @agilebuddha avienaash@gmail.com www.agilebuddha.com Thank You! Take this conversation online by tweeting using the hashtag #SrijanWW

×