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Converting need into demand

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Converting need into demand

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  2. 2. 2 Session2: Design thinking Converting Need into Demand
  3. 3. 3 Design Thinking : The Process - Empathize DEFINE IDEATE PROTOTY PE TEST SHOW DON’T TELL EMPA THYZE
  4. 4. 4 Design Thinking : The Process
  5. 5. 5 Empathize: Why ? •As human centered designer, you need to “understand the people” for whom you are designing •Problems that you try to solve are “rarely your own” - they are those of particular users •In order to design for your users, you must build “empathy” for who they are & what is important to them
  6. 6. 6 Empathize: Blind man vs DVD player - 3mins video- VS
  7. 7. 7 What do you: •See? •Want to ask him? Empathize: Blind man vs DVD player
  8. 8. 8 •Watching what people do and how they interact with environment gives you clue about what they think & feel •Understanding the clues will give you insight that will lead you to innovative solutions Empathize: angry passengers - delayed flight video – Sriwijaya Air vs Brussell Air
  9. 9. 9 •Observe: View users in their behaviour in the context of their lives •Engage: Interact with & interview users through both scheduled & short ‘intercept’ encounters •Immerse: Experience what your user experience Empathize: How ?
  10. 10. 10 The mission : translate observations into insights and insights into product and services that will improve lives.
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  32. 32. 32 Empathize: Methods & tools Assume a beginner’s mindset : Why ? •We all carry our experiences, understanding, & expertise with us. •These aspects of ourselves are incredibly valuable assets to bring to the design challenge – but at the right time, & with intentionality. •Our assumptions may be misconceptions & stereotypes, & can restrict the amount of real empathy we can build. •Assume a beginner’s mindset in order to put aside these biases, so that you can approach a design challenge afresh.
  33. 33. 33 Empathize: Methods & tools Assume a beginner’s mindset : How ? •Don’t judge. Just observe & engage users without the influence of value judgments upon their actions, circumstances, decisions, or “issues.” •Question everything. Question even (and especially) the things you think you already understand. Ask questions to learn about how the user perceives the world. Think about how a 4-year-old asks “Why?” about everything. Follow up an answer to one “why” with a second “why.” •Be truly curious. Strive to assume a posture of wonder & curiosity, especially in circumstances that seem either familiar or uncomfortable. •Find patterns. Look for interesting threads & themes that emerge across interactions with users. •Listen. Really. Lose your agenda & let the scene soak into your psyche. Absorb what users say to you, & how they say it, without thinking about the next thing you’re going to say.
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  36. 36. 36 Empathize: How to use ” What, How & Why ” ? Set-up: Divide a sheet into three sections: What?, How?, & Why? Start with concrete observations: •What is the person you’re observing doing in a particular situation or photograph? •Use descriptive phrases packed with adjectives & relative descriptions. Move to understanding: •How is the person you’re observing doing what they are doing? •Does it require effort? Do they appear rushed? Pained? •Does the activity or situation appear to be impacting the user’s state of being either positively or negatively? •Again, use as many descriptive phrases as possible here. Step out on a limb of interpretation: •Why is the person you’re observing doing what they’re doing, & in the particular way that they are doing it? •This step usually requires that you make informed guesses regarding motivation & emotions. •Step out on a limb in order to project meaning into the situation that you have been observing. This step will reveal assumptions that you should test with users, & often uncovers unexpected realizations about a particular situation.
  37. 37. 37 Empathize: User Camera Study –> Why ? •In empathy work, you want to understand your users’ lives, & specific tasks within the context of their lives. •A User Camera Study allows us to understand a user’s experience by seeing it through their eyes. •It also allows you to understand environments to which you might not normally have access.
  38. 38. 38 Empathize: User Camera Study – How ? 1. Identify subjects whose perspective you are interested in learning more about. 2. Briefly explain the purpose of the study, & ask if they would be willing to take photographs of their experiences. Get permission to use images they take. 3. Provide a camera to your subject & instructions such as: •“We would like to understand what a day in your life feels like. On a day of your choosing, take this camera with you everywhere you go, & take photos of experiences that are important to you.” Or, you could try: •“Please document your [morning routine] experience with this camera.” Or, •“Take pictures of things that are meaningful to you in your kitchen.” Frame your request a little broader than what you believe your problem space might be, in order to capture the surrounding context. Many insights can emerge from that surrounding space. 4. Afterwards, have your subject walk you through the pictures & explain the significance of what they captured. Return to a good empathetic interviewing technique to understand the deeper meaning of the visuals & experience they represent.
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  48. 48. 48 Traditional VS Design Thinking?
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  53. 53. 53 Empathize: IDEO METHOD CARD video - 3mins video-
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  55. 55. 55 Empathy Map
  56. 56. 56 Using the Empathy Map framework you will process what happened in the interview, make inferences about the thoughts and feelings of the person based on what they said, and connect the dots to identify a need or problem he/she has related to the challenge.
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  58. 58. 58 SAY section. Write down here all the quotes from the interview that catch your attention as you review your notes. Be as literal as possible (as opposed to rephrasing what they said in your own words).
  59. 59. 59 Do : DO section (optional). If you observed the person in action, describe here behaviors you saw. You can also combine interview and observation, by asking the person to walk you through what they are doing. **Note that you may not have anything in this section if you did not have the chance to do observations**
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  61. 61. 61 THINK and FEEL sections. Here is where you will make inferences (educated guesses) about the meaning of what the person said. What if you are wrong? You may very well be, but if you don’t take a leap and make inferences, you won’t get at deep unexpected needs. At later stages in the process you will get more data that will allow you to refine your understanding and definition of the problem.
  62. 62. 62 STAKEHOLDER needs a way to ________(PROBLEM/NEED)____ Because ____(INSIGHT)_____
  63. 63. 63 STAKEHOLDER: Here you should describe the person you are designing for (one you interviewed). Use at least 5 adjectives to describe that person. Make sure you add enough information to paint a picture of the person to someone who has not met him/her (“A detailed-oriented, reliable, degree-holding accountant, who is curious and able to work in teams, as well as collaborative and creative”).
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  67. 67. 67 PROBLEM/NEED: Use VERBS instead of NOUNS to define the problem/need. Nouns are often already solutions: as an example, contrast “Joe needs a better pencil” with “Joe needs a better way to write” or “Joe needs a better way to capture data.” In the first case the solution is already implied in the problem statement, so there is only opportunity for incremental innovation. In the latter frames, there is an opportunity to come up with innovative solutions that may go beyond an improved pencil.
  68. 68. 68 INSIGHT: Here you provide a justification for the need you stated. The insight often comes from connecting the dots between different elements on the empathy map.
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  72. 72. 72 Business Model Generation
  73. 73. 73 Next week’s class assignment: Empathize •Get insight from your local street food vendors •Who are they ? •What issues do they face & Why ? •How can you help them? Each team: Present 10mins sharing of street vendor interview, findings on •Vendor’s background •Key issues faced •Proposed solutions
  74. 74. 74 Define
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  77. 77. 77 IDEA must “fail”.. to be continued
  78. 78. 78 Before it can be succeed...
  79. 79. 79 Dare to make mistakes? 79
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  83. 83. 83 Idea?
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  85. 85. 85 @WisnuDewobroto : ASSUMPTION = RISK!
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  94. 94. 94 THANK YOU

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