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Parsable's culture

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Parsable's culture presentation

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Parsable's culture

  1. 1. Our Culture
  2. 2. Our Mission Help Operational Managers reach the promised land of jobs done right, every time by replacing 1950s tools like paper & walkie talkies with a collaboration app for industrial teams* for increased productivity, enhanced quality, and increased safety * This includes: 1. Clear accurate job instructions on mobile devices 2. Multimedia collaboration with colleagues & supply chain 3. Effortless data capture for continuous improvement
  3. 3. Culture? Mission = What we do. What the goal is. Culture = How we do it. How to behave every day.
  4. 4. Why culture matters? = 81% culture or attitude (only 11% skills) Source: Hiring for Attitude, by Mark Murphy
  5. 5. What do these mean? ● Coachability (26%): The ability to accept and implement feedback from bosses, colleagues, customers, and others ● Emotional Intelligence (23%): The ability to understand and manage one’s own emotions and accurately assess others’ emotions ● Motivation (17%): Sufficient drive to achieve one’s full potential and excel in the job ● Temperament (15%): Attitude and personality suited to the particular job and work environment ● Technical Competence (11%): Functional or technical skills required to do the job Source: Hiring for Attitude, by Mark Murphy
  6. 6. Testing for skills is easy... ● Find the bug in this code ● Let’s build a quick web project in React ● Show me your portfolio ● Pitch me Parsable as if I were a customer ● etc... It’s straightforward to screen bad skills candidates out at the door, instead of having them fail at work.
  7. 7. Testing for culture - an exercise Never Hire Always Hire 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ● You are a manager at Hypothetical Corp ● Hypothetical Corp is a startup selling software to the Fortune 500 ● Hypothetical is hiring, and we’ve asked the candidates to answer: “Could you tell me about a time when you didn’t know how to do something that a customer was asking you to do?” ● Read the next paragraph & grade the answer from:
  8. 8. Testing for culture - an exercise At my last job I was inundated with requests that were outside my area of expertise or influence. I am always pretty cautious when it comes to stepping outside my comfort zone, so most of the time I just turned the situation over to someone more experienced. After all, I want to make sure I’m protecting the company’s back because I don’t want to touch a project for which I’m unqualified and then have it do damage to the client. The client’s interests are always of paramount importance. And it’s critical that an engineer adhere to accepted practices and the proper processes. If I’m in a situation where I don’t know those processes, it’s better for me to pass the request to someone else that does.
  9. 9. Here’s how we rated the candidate... Rating Score Count 1 2 2 5 3 11 4 7 5 2 6 3 7 0
  10. 10. Testing for culture - an exercise What if you now knew Hypothetical Corp values more than anything employees who exhibit the following attributes: ● You take ownership of problems — even if you’re not the one who will ultimately fix it, you shepherd the process until it’s resolved. ● You’re a self-directed learner — you take full responsibility for growing and developing your skills, and while you may not learn everything, you’re in a constant state of growth. Now grade the same candidate again...
  11. 11. Testing for culture - let’s try again At my last job I was inundated with requests that were outside my area of expertise or influence. I am always pretty cautious when it comes to stepping outside my comfort zone, so most of the time I just turned the situation over to someone more experienced. After all, I want to make sure I’m protecting the company’s back because I don’t want to touch a project for which I’m unqualified and then have it do damage to the client. The client’s interests are always of paramount importance. And it’s critical that an engineer adhere to accepted practices and the proper processes. If I’m in a situation where I don’t know those processes, it’s better for me to pass the request to someone else that does.
  12. 12. Why culture matters…. Rating Count #1 Count #2 1 2 13 2 5 13 3 11 3 4 7 0 5 2 0 6 3 0 7 0 0
  13. 13. How to discover our culture 1. Interviewed 15 team members for 1-2 hours each 2. Collected over 500 stories 3. Mapped those stories into themes 4. Created survey questions for those themes 5. Surveyed the entire company 6. Analyzed the survey results 7. Mapped those results into themes
  14. 14. What do we get out of this? ● A common code to live by as Citizens of Parsable ● A set of culture interview questions ● An answer guideline for good & bad answers
  15. 15. Word Pictures* Parsable citizen’s guide to good citizenry * named so because you should be able to read the words, close your eyes, imagine a picture and have that be the same picture your teammate is imagining.
  16. 16. I have grit in the face of adversity Needs Work Good Work Great Work When we encounter problems (with the product, a customer, a prospect), I exclaim that we are a failure or failing at our job. When we encounter an obstacle, I get demoralized because I realize that things are going to be hard. When customers don’t like the first version of a feature or product, I think that we’ve failed and that there’s no use in that feature or product. When I can’t get in touch with a customer or prospect, I keep trying until I get through. When I have to work with a difficult customer, I find a path forward. I brainstorm with others, but I know the company relies on me to find a solution, so I keep trying till something works. When I run into a naysayer or gatekeeper, I try both to convince them and, in parallel, find other champions to make sure that our product gets the attention it deserves. When we encounter an obstacle, I see it as an opportunity to learn and improve. I do everything in the Good Work category, plus ... When I see an opportunity to help the company, I jump on it and try to help -- irrespective of whether it’s in my area of expertise. When I’m responsible for minding an area, and even though I might be overwhelmed with work, I continue to chip away at it, despite the lack of immediate reward or recognition from others. I take on projects that don’t have immediate rewards, because I know they will add long-term value to the company.
  17. 17. I seek to understand the world through others’ eyes Needs Work Good Work Great Work When the team is discussing a topic in which I consider myself an expert, I don’t listen to other people’s opinions, because I’m the expert. When a coworker asks me to perform a task with high urgency, I’m annoyed that they always ask for stuff last minute. When making a change to my area of the product, I don’t think about the impact it has on other teams or on customers. When engaged in a conversation, I make it my goal to get my point across or convince the other person, rather than learn what they have to say. When the customer encounters a product issue, I assume the customer did something wrong, that it was their fault. When working through a complex feature or request, I first try to put myself in the customer’s shoes, understand what they needed when they asked for this feature, and work from that insight. When a coworker asks me to help them with a task, I assume there must be a good reason. When joining a team or project, I strive first to understand what decisions were made prior to my joining. When talking to someone, I ask open-ended questions and seek to understand their perspective before adding my inputs. When a customer asks for a feature that doesn’t make much sense, I try to put myself in the customer’s shoes to figure out why they are asking for that feature. I do everything in the Good Work category, plus ... I create environments where everyone can add their voice to the discussion, and actively work to ensure that quiet team members are given the opportunity to talk and be listened to. If I’m working with a difficult customer, rather than getting frustrated at him, I try to see the world through his eyes & understand why they may be mad. After interacting with a customer or prospect, I strive to teach my fellow teammates how that customer thinks and reacts to our product, so I can spread that empathy to folks who did not experience it firsthand. Even if I’m an expert in a domain, I strive to keep beginner’s mind, to think and explain my rationale like any newbie would.
  18. 18. I ask how can I help? Needs Work Good Work Great Work I badmouth teammates or customers to try to make myself look better. I gossip about my coworkers. When a coworker asks for help, I tell them I’m too busy already with my own work If I’m part of a complex project, I’ve finished my work, and others are struggling to meet their commitments, I complain that they are making me look bad. I believe my contributions have an outsized effect on our success compared to my teammates’, and deserve outsized recognition. I think I’m smarter than my teammates and have difficulty trusting others’ decisions or work. I regularly commit things to others that I don’t then deliver. When a team I’m working on/with has done good work, I share credit openly. I’m willing to chip in to help a team member with their work, even when it’s outside my core area of expertise or responsibility. I’m willing to help out with any part of the product, even if it means I’ll have to work harder to contribute than an expert might. Even under stress, I take the time to help a coworker or answer their questions. If I’m part of a complex project, I’ve finished my work, and others are struggling to meet their commitments, I help my teammates get their work done so the whole project can get delivered to the customer. I take time to publicly recognize teammates who do great work. I do everything in the Good Work category, plus ... While continuing to deliver on my existing obligations, I also take additional significant projects, even though no one asked me, because I know the company needs them to be done. I take on projects that don’t have immediate rewards, because I know they will add long-term value to the company. I am willing to put myself in uncomfortable situations for the long-term benefit of the team and the company. I am comfortable being the “odd one out” if it benefits the company. In the heat of the moment, I cover for a team member & their responsibilities even though I know it won’t accrue to me and likely no one will know how hard I worked or personally sacrificed to make it happen.
  19. 19. I see opportunity in difficult situations Needs Work Good Work Great Work I regularly say “I can’t do that”, “I don’t know how to do that”, “I don’t want to do that”, or “I don’t want to do that anymore” In high-stress situations, I criticize others. When an issue happens, I seek to blame other or context for the issue. Problems are never my fault. It’s always something wrong with the PRD, the process, something that others did. I think I’m putting in good enough work, and that there is no need to get better from here. “I’m too good for that. That’s not in my job role” I’m willing to pitch in even though it’s not in my area. When asked to do something that’s not traditionally in my purview, I learn about it and help out. I take it upon myself to continually improve both the depth and breadth of my skills. When presented with an obstacle, I’m energized by the opportunity to surmount it because I see it as an opportunity to learn. I proactively seek out challenging problems because I know they can maximize my learning curve. I plot my own path through a chaotic situation. I do everything in the Good Work category, plus ... I roll up my sleeves and learn about a topic I previously knew nothing about so that I can be excellent at it. I regularly strive to improve myself and look for ways to bring that back to improve the company as a whole. I proactively seek opportunities to expand my knowledge and ways I can be of service to the company. I make a concerted effort to find ways to improve the company, then execute on those things. In a stressful or uncomfortable situation, I create opportunities so my teammates can realize they are also an opportunity to learn and grow.
  20. 20. I have pride in craftsmanship Needs Work Good Work Great Work If it’s 6p, I stop working. It doesn’t matter if the work is done or if others are depending on me for something. If others’ work isn’t done to my level of quality, I complain about it or get dejected that we’re failing as a company. If someone provides critical feedback on my work, I get offended. I regularly build “quick fix” solutions to problems without spending the extra time to make sure the problem is truly solved. I assume I’m the only one who cares about their own craftsmanship. I don’t trust my teammates’ decisions or give them the benefit of the doubt. I don’t hold others accountable when they consistently fail to deliver on their promises to the team. I seek out others’ opinions to provide feedback and improve my work. I sweat the details and am patient in explaining my decisions to others. When asked to perform work (build a feature, a customer-facing task), I think about the request carefully, think of ways I can improve it, and implement it to my highest bar. I accept criticism of my work because I see it as a way to improve the quality of my work next time. I never take incomplete information as an excuse to not do the work. I put myself in the customer’s shoes and dig deeper. I look inwards for the drive to find a solution. I think cross-functionally. It may not be the quickest way to get something done, but it’s optimized for quality delivery. I do everything in the Good Work category, plus ... I bring together the complete set of stakeholders and facilitate collaboration so we can think through a feature to make sure it’s built right for the customer. I strive to solve problems outside my area of expertise I strive to teach people how to improve their own skills and do so without being pedantic or seeking credit. It’s late and I want to go home, but there’s value in that extra hour of work -- so I stay and do it. I’m willing to call the team out when something isn’t functioning properly. I’m willing to hold others accountable even though it’s an unpleasant situation to be in.
  21. 21. I’m a proactive problem solver who gets shit done Needs Work Good Work Great Work I correctly identify problems, but then complain instead of participating in finding a solution. When a problem arises, it’s never my fault or responsibility. It’s always something wrong with the PRD, the process, something that others did. I think if a feature can’t be built the perfect way, it shouldn’t be built at all. My teammates have to proactively ping me to find out the status of my work items. When I’m given a project with open questions, I make a bunch of silent assumptions. When asked to do something, I list all the reasons it won’t work. I’m unwilling to make decisions under uncertainty. I always need more data. When a teammate mentions something is broken, I think “how can I help fix it.” I see iterative improvement as a good thing. I want to “make it better.” When I realize that something I’m working on is going to be late, I proactively communicate to all the stakeholders in a visible and transparent way and take personal responsibility for the delay. When someone comes to me with something they need done, I own the delivery of that actionable thing. If I realize that some things are outside the scope of my day-to-day job, I still make sure they get done, whether by me or by somebody else. Even if I delegate some of the work, I continue to own the complete delivery. When in doubt, I proactively raise questions to clarify my hypotheses. I do everything in the Good Work category, plus ... I regularly solve problems for the company, even outside my area of expertise I take what I’m doing and optimize the work product for what is needed at the time. I take the time to understand the big picture. I’m proactive in helping others get their work done. I constantly remove distractions and context-switches from my co-workers so they can focus on getting their work done I’m not burdened by precedents. I’m inspired to out-execute and set new records for myself. I balance the need for urgency and need for quality.
  22. 22. I’m humble, radically candid, and open to feedback Needs Work Good Work Great Work If I think a coworker did something wrong, I criticize them openly or in front of others. When someone has made me mad or sad, I assume they have negative intentions towards me, or are incompetent. I take critical feedback as a personal assault or a sign that people don’t trust me or my skills. When something fails, I blame others for the event and assume it’s someone else’s fault. I regularly talk over my peers in meetings. I say hurtful things about my teammates. I’m openly critical of my peers to try to make myself look good. When someone has made me mad or sad, I suffer in silence and build resentment towards the person. In the heat of a debate, I’m receptive to acknowledging the common goals with my counterpart, and using those goals to work backwards & resolve sticking points. When someone has done or said something to make me angry or sad, I go talk to them 1:1, discuss my feelings without getting defensive, try to understand what they were thinking when they said what they did, and find a solution that satisfies both parties. When something went wrong, I realize where I fell short & am specific in following up with a desire to learn from my mistakes. I follow up with the team and the offended parties with tactics or a strategy to ensure it doesn’t happen again. When I haven’t received feedback in a while, I think of specific events I want feedback on and proactively go ask my peers for feedback. I do everything in the Good Work category, plus ... When someone gives me criticism, even if poorly worded or harsh, I try to see the truth in their statement, listen actively, ask open-ended questions, and use it as an opportunity to improve. I find ways to tell my peers who made a mistake in a way that is still respectful of the work that was done and the good intentions behind it. I help other people have radically candid conversations with each other by refusing to be the party they vent to. Instead, I recommend they speak to each other and resolve their differences. Even under duress, I’m always open to receiving criticism and willing to act on it to improve.
  23. 23. Some Parsable Culture Heros Grit in the face of adversity: Amy, Chase, Kathryn Seek to understand through other people’s eyes: Scott, Kathryn, Ryan, Mark, Will, Alex, Rory How can I help: Will, Kathryn, Tom, Zach, Devansh, Mark, Amy, Harish, Derrick Seeing opportunity in difficult situations: Devansh, Will, Kathryn, Harish, Ab, Yanda, Scott, Ryan Pride of craftsmanship: Yanda, Zach, Harish, Beth, Will, Sam, Amy Proactive problem-solver who gets shit done: Ab, Kathryn, Rory, Tom, Yanda, Scott, Devansh, Chase, Will Humble, radically candid, and open to feedback: Scott, Yanda, Ryan, Rory, Harish
  24. 24. Interview Questions & Answer Guideline Parsable citizen’s guide to immigration
  25. 25. You’ll have to apply to find out careers@parsable.com

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