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SC II - Numerical Tools & Algorithms - AGA - CEI40

Contents of the presentation:

- ABOUT ME
- Bisection Method using C#
- False Position Method using C#
- Gauss Seidel Method using MATLAB
- Secant Mod Method using MATLAB
- Report on Numerical Errors
- Optimization using Golden-Section Algorithm with Application on MATLAB

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SC II - Numerical Tools & Algorithms - AGA - CEI40

  1. 1. 9-Month Program, Intake40, CEI Track SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING II NUMERICAL TOOLS & ALGORITHMS Ahmed Gamal Abdel Gawad
  2. 2. CONTENTS ABOUT ME Bisection Method using C# False Position Method using C# Gauss Seidel Method using MATLAB Secant Mod Method using MATLAB Report on Numerical Errors Optimization using Golden-Section Algorithm with Application on MATLAB
  3. 3.  TEACHING ASSISTANT AT MENOUFIYA UNIVERSITY.  GRADE: EXCELLENT WITH HONORS.  BEST MEMBER AT ‘UTW-7 PROGRAM’, ECG.  ITI 9-MONTH PROGRAM, INT40, CEI TRACK STUDENT.  AUTODESK REVIT CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL.  BACHELOR OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, 2016.  LECTURER OF ‘DESIGN OF R.C.’ COURSE, YOUTUBE. ABOUT ME
  4. 4. Bisection Method C# static double Bisection(double x1, double x2, int maxIterations, double tolerance, out int count) { double f1 = Function(x1); double f2 = Function(x2); double xm = 0.0; double fm; if (f1 * f2 > 0.0) throw new InvalidOperationException("No Bracket"); count = 0; for (int i = 0; i < maxIterations; i++) { count++; xm = (x1 + x2) / 2; fm = Function(xm); if (Math.Abs(fm) <= tolerance) break; if (f1 * fm > 0) { x1 = xm; f1 = fm; } else { x2 = xm; f2 = fm; } } return xm; }
  5. 5. False Position Method C# static double FalsePosition(double x1, double x2, int maxIterations, double tolerance, out int count) { double f1 = Function(x1); double f2 = Function(x2); double xp = 0.0; double fp; double s; if (f1 * f2 > 0.0) throw new InvalidOperationException("No Bracket"); count = 0; for (int i = 0; i < maxIterations; i++) { count++; s = (f2 - f1) / (x2 - x1); xp = x1 - f1 / s; fp = Function(xp); if (Math.Abs(fp) <= tolerance) break; if (f1 * fp > 0) { x1 = xp; f1 = fp; } else { x2 = xp; f2 = fp; } } return xp; }
  6. 6. Gauss Seidel function[x,nit] = gseidel(A,b,nmax,tol) % Function to run gseidel method [nr, nc] = size(A); if (nc ~= nr), error('A is NOT Square'); end % check square matrix x = zeros(nr,1); % Vector of inital values of x for k = 1:nr x(k) = b(k)/A(k,k); % Initial values of x end err = zeros(nr,1); % Vector of errors errmax = 1; % Initial value for errmax > tolerance nit=0.0; % No of iterations while (errmax > tol && nit < nmax) xold = x; % Set xold to the previous values of x nit = nit + 1; % Increse No of iterations by 1 for k = 1:nr sum = A(k,:)*x; % Calculate the sum term sum = sum - A(k,k)*x(k); % Exclude akk and xk from calculations x(k) = (b(k) - sum)/A(k,k); % Calculate x new values err(k) = abs(x(k)) - abs(xold(k)); % Record vector of errors end errmax = max(abs(err)); end end
  7. 7. Secant Mod function [xr,nit]= secantmod(func,xo,deltax,kmax,etol) % Secant method to find root of function “func” using % one starting point xo and small perturbation ?x for % max iterations kmax xv1 = xo; xv2 = xo + deltax; nit = 0; for k = 1:kmax nit = nit +1; vf1 = func(xv1); vf2 = func(xv2); vsec = (vf2 - vf1) / deltax; if (abs(vsec) <= 10^(-15)),error('Zero Secant Slope');end xnew = xv1 - vf1/vsec; vfnew = func(xnew); if abs(vfnew) <= etol xr = xnew; break end xv1 = xnew; xv2 = xnew + deltax; end end
  8. 8. Report on Numerical Error Truncation Error The word 'Truncate' means 'to shorten'. Truncation error refers to an error in a method, which occurs because some number/series of steps (finite or infinite) is truncated (shortened) to a fewer number. Such errors are essentially algorithmic errors and we can predict the extent of the error that will occur in the method. For instance, if we approximate the sine function by the first two non- zero term of its Taylor series, as in sin 𝑥 = 𝑥 − 1 6 𝑥3 for small x, the resulting error is a truncation error. It is present even with infinite-precision arithmetic, because it is caused by truncation of the infinite Taylor series to form the algorithm.
  9. 9. Report on Numerical Error Roundoff Error A roundoff error, also called rounding error, is the difference between the result produced by a given algorithm using exact arithmetic and the result produced by the same algorithm using finite-precision, rounded arithmetic. Rounding errors are due to inexactness in the representation of real numbers and the arithmetic operations done with them. This is a form of quantization error. When using approximation equations or algorithms, especially when using finitely many digits to represent real numbers (which in theory have infinitely many digits), one of the goals of numerical analysis is to estimate computation errors. Computation errors, also called numerical errors, include both truncation errors and roundoff errors.
  10. 10. Report on Numerical Error Notation Representation Approximation Error 1/7 0.142 857 142 857 142 857……. 0.142 857 0.000 000 142 857 ln 2 0.693 147 180 559 945 309 41... 0.693 147 0.000 000 180 559 945 309 41.. . log10 2 0.301 029 995 663 981 195 21... 0.3010 0.000 029 995 663 981 195 21.. . 3√2 1.259 921 049 894 873 164 76... 1.25992 0.000 001 049 894 873 164 76.. . √2 1.414 213 562 373 095 048 80... 1.41421 0.000 003 562 373 095 048 80.. . e 2.718 281 828 459 045 235 36... 2.718 281 828 459 045 0.000 000 000 000 000 235 36.. . π 3.141 592 653 589 793 238 46... 3.141 592 653 589 793 0.000 000 000 000 000 238 46.. .
  11. 11. Report on Numerical Error Accuracy and Precision Measurements and calculations can be characterized with regard to their accuracy and precision. Accuracy refers to how closely a value agrees with the true value. Precision refers to how closely values agree with each other. The following figures illustrate the difference between accuracy and precision. In the first figure, the given values (black dots) are more accurate; whereas in the second figure, the given values are more precise. The term error represents the imprecision and inaccuracy of a numerical computation.
  12. 12. Report on Numerical Error Accuracy Precision
  13. 13. Report on Numerical Error Real world example: Patriot missile failure due to magnification of roundoff error On 25 February 1991, during the Gulf War, an American Patriot missile battery in Dharan, Saudi Arabia, failed to intercept an incoming Iraqi Scud missile. The Scud struck an American Army barracks and killed 28 soldiers. It turns out that the cause was an inaccurate calculation of the time since boot due to computer arithmetic errors.
  14. 14. Optimization using Golden- Section Algorithm Euclid’s definition of the golden ratio is based on dividing a line into two segments so that the ratio of the whole line to the larger segment is equal to the ratio of the larger segment to the smaller segment. This ratio is called the golden ratio.
  15. 15. Optimization using Golden- Section Algorithm The actual value of the golden ratio can be derived by expressing Euclid’s definition as 𝑙1+𝑙2 𝑙1 = 𝑙1 𝑙2 Multiplying by 𝑙1 𝑙2 and collecting terms yields ∅2 − ∅ − 1 = 0 Where ∅ = 𝑙1/𝑙2 .The positive root of this equation is the golden ratio: ∅ = 1+ 5 2 = 1.61803398874989
  16. 16. Optimization using Golden- Section Algorithm The golden-section search is similar in spirit to the bisection approach for locating roots. Recall that bisection hinged on defining an interval, specified by a lower guess (xl) and an upper guess (xu) that bracketed a single root. The presence of a root between these bounds was verified by determining that f (xl) and f (xu) had different signs. The root was then estimated as the midpoint of this interval: 𝑥 𝑟 = 𝑥 𝑢 + 𝑥𝑙 2
  17. 17. Optimization using Golden- Section Algorithm The key to making this approach efficient is the wise choice of the intermediate points. As in bisection, the goal is to minimize function evaluations by replacing old values with new values. For bisection, this was accomplished by choosing the midpoint. For the golden-section search, the two intermediate points are chosen according to the golden ratio: 𝑥1 = 𝑥𝑙 + 𝑑 𝑥2 = 𝑥 𝑢 − 𝑑 where 𝑑 = (∅ − 1)(𝑥 𝑢 − 𝑥𝑙)
  18. 18. Optimization using Golden- Section Algorithm The function is evaluated at these two interior points. Two results can occur: 1. If, as in Fig. 7.6a, f (x1)< f (x2), then f (x1) is the minimum, and the domain of x to the left of x 2, from xl to x2, can be eliminated because it does not contain the minimum. For this case, x2 becomes the new xl for the next round. 2. If f (x2)< f (x1), then f (x2) is the minimum and the domain of x to the right of x1, from x 1 to xu would be eliminated. For this case, x1 becomes the new xu for the next round.
  19. 19. Optimization using Golden- Section Algorithm
  20. 20. Optimization using Golden- Section Algorithm function [x,fx,ea,iter]=goldmin(f,xl,xu,es,maxit) % goldmin: minimization golden section search % uses golden section search to find the minimum of f if nargin<3,error('at least 3 input arguments required'),end if nargin<4||isempty(es), es=0.0001;end if nargin<5||isempty(maxit), maxit=50;end phi=(1+sqrt(5))/2; iter=0; while(1) d = (phi-1)*(xu - xl); x1 = xl + d; x2 = xu - d; if f(x1) < f(x2) xopt = x1; xl = x2; else xopt = x2; xu = x1; end iter=iter+1; if xopt~=0, ea = (2 - phi) * abs((xu - xl) / xopt) * 100;end if ea <= es || iter >= maxit,break,end end x=xopt;fx=f(xopt); MATLAB Function
  21. 21. Optimization using Golden- Section Algorithm Use the following parameter values for your calculation: g = 9.81 m/s2, z0 = 100 m, v0 = 55 m/s, m = 80 kg, and c = 15 kg/s. Example
  22. 22. Optimization using Golden- Section Algorithm Command Window >> g=9.81;v0=55;m=80;c=15;z0=100; >> z=@(t) -(z0+m/c*(v0+m*g/c)*(1-exp(-c/m*t))-m*g/c*t); >> [xmin,fmin,ea,iter]=goldmin(z,0,8) xmin = 3.8317 fmin = -192.8609 ea = 6.9356e-05 iter = 29 Notice how because this is a maximization, we have entered the negative of the equation. Consequently, fmin corresponds to a maximum height of 192.8609.
  23. 23. THANK YOU  linkedin.com/in/aGaabdelgawad/

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