soc-syllabus-f11

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soc-syllabus-f11

  1. 1. Principles of Sociology Fall 2011 Instructor Information Professor Abby Gondek Email: agondek@stfranciscollege.edu but I prefer if you e-mail me via Angel Cell: 781-248-7548 (Please be respectful and only use this number for legitimate class-related reasons that cannot be addressed through e-mail) Class time and place Saturday 9-12 Room 6403 I will not hold official office hours, but if you have questions, I can speak with you after class. We will have small group meetings during class that will give you the opportunity to ask me questions or express any concerns you have. Required Materials Bring the following to every class session. I frequently refer to and use the textbook in class. I will refer to the syllabus and reading/assignment schedule during each class meeting. Textbook James Henslin, Sociology Core Concepts: A Down to Earth Approach, Fourth Edition You will need access to MySocLab, an online resource that accompanies the book. Class ID: cm498597 Syllabus and Reading/Assignment Schedule I will refer to this syllabus and the accompanying schedule on a daily basis. You will need to make notes on it and refer to it during class. Course Overview and Objectives This course will be a challenging, inspirational and transformational introduction to the field of sociology from a gender, race, class and sexuality perspective. We will discuss multiple and intersecting forms of oppression such as sexism, racism, classism, and heterosexism, among others. We will study the experiences of people all around the world. You will have the opportunity to express your self and identity through creativity and activism. We will explore how societies affect individual people’s identities and how individuals, like you, can transform the societies in which they live. During the semester you will have the opportunity to participate in a service-learning project. You will also lead a research activity with small groups based on class readings. I hope you will question your assumptions and biases, and open your mind to new ways of thinking and being. In this class, our study of sociology will be dedicated to social justice and social change. We are not only here to read and write critically; we are here to transform our world into a just and equal society for people of all genders, races, ethnicities, classes, ages, abilities, nationalities, sexualities, and religions. 1
  2. 2. • Prepare yourself to become not only a dedicated student, but a thoughtful teacher as well. This is a space where creativity and determination are highly valued, where hard work and passion are acknowledged. • You will choose a topic within the field of sociology that interests you. Then you will research and teach this topic to the class. • In this class, everyone’s voice will be equally respected and space will be created for those students whose voices aren’t usually heard. • Reflection on your personal experiences and your learning is of the utmost importance. • We will learn by doing, by exploring our multiple social locations, by teaching each other. • This is a supportive and caring space. By the end of this course, you will • Understand the connections between and think critically about diverse thematic areas within the field of sociology such as: gender, race, class, and sexuality. • Excel in self-expression in written, oral and visual forms. • Reflect on your multiple identities, and your privileged and oppressed locations in society. • Collaborate with fellow students and the NYC community to practice creative research, teaching and activism. My big goal for this semester: Every student will earn an overall score of 85% in the class. This is 85 out of 100 points possible. You will work frequently in small groups during class and will have the opportunity to support each other and work together to study for exams and complete research for projects. The group of four students who receives the highest average percentage in the class, will receive a special end-of-semester celebration with Professor Gondek. Course Policies Please see St Francis College’s guidelines for more specific information. The following policies apply to this specific course. Attendance, Participation and Tardiness Attendance and participation are required and you are graded on them. If you do not come to class, you will miss out on group discussions and activities, lectures, and films. I will take attendance every time we meet. Because this class will only meet 12 times before the final, my attendance policy is especially strict. I allow only one absence during the semester, for whatever reason. After the allowed absence, each subsequent absence will result in a two-point deduction from your attendance grade. (There is a total of 10 points possible for attendance/participation.) Tardiness is unacceptable. Since we only meet once each week, you need to get here on time and participate. If you arrive more than fifteen minutes late or leave more than fifteen minutes early, I will count it as an absence. Two late arrivals or early departures (up to 15 minutes) will equal one absence. After the absence deductions, I will add up to four points for in-class participation. This means that you will not be penalized for not speaking in class, but you will be rewarded for participating. 2
  3. 3. In this class “excused” and “unexcused” absences DO NOT EXIST. If you are absent, you are absent, regardless of the reason. You have one free absence, after that your attendance grade will be affected, no exceptions. If you find that you are absent or tardy a lot, make sure you participate when you are in class, so that you can get the four-point boost for participation. To find out where you stand in terms of your absences and tardiness, please e-mail me via Angel or speak to me after class. Plagiarism Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else’s ideas and work and using it as your own. Be very careful when researching on the Internet. Always consider the source of the material, and make sure to explicitly cite the website from which you gathered the information using the correct formatting. Plagiarism not only relates to cheating off the Internet, but also to how you use information from books, articles, etc. If you do not correctly cite information from print sources, you are plagiarizing. Penalties for plagiarism range from an “F” grade to expulsion from the college. If you have questions about what might be considered plagiarism, please ask. Other Course Policies You will have the chance to add to these during the first class meeting. • Respect fellow students, your instructor, and any guests who visit our class. Be fully present during class time. This means cell phones and i-pods must be turned off. Vibrate does not count as off. No text messaging in class. If you have children and/or need to keep your phone on for emergency purposes, please notify me at the beginning of the semester. Do not complete work for other classes, sleep, or read the newspaper. No crossword puzzles. If you are doing any of these things, you will be asked to leave class and will be marked absent. • Using laptops in class is acceptable as long as you are taking notes or the lap-top/internet research is a part of the class activity. If you are surfing the Internet or using the laptop for another non-Sociology purpose, you will no longer be allowed to bring your lap-top to class, will be asked to leave, and will be marked absent. • Please be aware of the language you choose to use in class and in your assignments. Racist, sexist, homophobic and other offensive comments do not contribute to creating a safe space. Should any questionable remarks be made, we will address these as a class. Disability Statement: If you have a specific physical, psychological or learning disability and require accommodations, please let me know within the first two weeks of the semester so that your learning needs may be appropriately met. Grading Grade Breakdown Attendance/Participation 10 points Participate in small group meeting with instructor – 2 times (3 points each) 6 points Research Presentations • Presentation #1: Research activity + RPW (7 points) • Presentation #2: Analysis/Results + RAW (7 points) 14 points Service Learning • Presentation #1 (8 points) • FINAL Presentation (10 points) 18 points Homework/In-class work 8 points 3
  4. 4. Exams • 5 Chapter Exams on MySocLab (5 points each) • Research Methods Exam on Angel (5 points) • Service Learning Exam on Angel (5 points) • 6 Oral in-class quizzes (6 points) 41 points Evaluation of your experience in this class 3 points Total 100 points Grade Scale Point Range Letter Grade Point Range Letter Grade 94-100 A 73-76 C 90-93 A- 70-72 C- 87-89 B+ 67-69 D+ 83-86 B 63-66 D 80-82 B- 60-62 D- 77-79 C+ 0-59 F Important note about grading: You will receive the grade that you have earned, by meeting the course requirements. DO NOT request that the instructor give you a certain grade for any individual assignment or the final grade. If you are concerned about your grade, please discuss this with your instructor as soon as possible, so that we can work together to make sure you receive a grade that you deserve and are satisfied with. Be pro-active and check your grades on Angel regularly; I update my grade-book weekly. If you notice something that looks incorrect, bring it to my attention right away. NEVER wait until the end of the semester to discuss your grade. You will receive the grade that you have earned, based on your work in the class. No late work is accepted EVER and there are NO excused absences. If you miss the class when you were supposed to present, you CANNOT make up the presentation. I am very strict about this, so please plan accordingly. Description of Course Elements Small Group meeting with Instructor Twice during the semester you will meet with me in a small group for the last 15 minutes of class. During the first time we meet we will do an “object share.” This is your opportunity to tell us about your identity, family, and cultural background. You will also have the chance to ask questions, voice difficulties you might be having, and brainstorm for presentations. This is a way for us to get to know each other on an individual and personal level. You will meet with me based on when you are presenting to the class. The first meeting will be focused on the Research Presentation and the second meeting will be focused on the Service-Learning Project. You should NOT be absent on your assigned day. There will be no make-ups allowed. These meetings are worth 3 points each for a total of 6 points. 4
  5. 5. Once you decide which group you’d like to be in (based on the topic that most interests you), go through the daily schedule and highlight the days that you are scheduled to meet with me. You must decide on your group during the first class meeting. You will be grouped based on your presentation topic. Group Date of meeting #1 Date of meeting #2 A 9/17 10/15 B 9/24 10/22 C 10/1 10/29 D 10/8 11/5 5
  6. 6. Schedule of Presentation due dates Group A Group B Group C Group D Research Presentation (1) Week 4: Power, Privilege and Oppression 10/1 Week 5: History of Oppression/Violence against women 10/8 Week 6: History of Oppression/Race-Based Violence 10/15 Week 7: Violence against women/Violence in Prison system 10/22 Analysis/ Results Presentation (2)* Week 6 10/15 Week 7 10/22 Week 8 10/29 Week 9 11/5 Service Learning Presentation (1) Week 8: Gender Identity 10/29 Week 9: Racial-Ethnic Identity 11/5 Week 10: Family Relationships 11/19 Week 11: Activism 12/3 * Please note that the analysis/results presentation will be based on the topic from your initial research presentation, NOT the theme from the week when you do the second presentation. Research Presentations to small groups of students Objectives: In order for you to understand sociological research methods and how to implement them, you will work individually to design a research activity to implement with small groups of students in our class. In order to practice analyzing research results, you will present the results of your research two weeks later. These presentations will also require you to understand and apply concepts from your reading, conduct academic research, practice leading discussion and presenting to your peers. Topic: The topic of the study will be based on the readings for the week you present your study. You will need to narrow the topic after reading the sections you are assigned to. You will only be expected to cover a portion of the overall content you are assigned. Tip: Feel free to re-do or re-envision one of the studies (or combine several studies) mentioned in that week’s readings. Logistics FAQs: How many students are in each group? Approximately three other students will be leading activities/explaining results at the same time as you, but you are responsible for preparing your own activity. How long do the presentations have to be? The initial presentation (aka “activity”) will be ten minutes long and the structure of the activity will 6
  7. 7. be based on one to two of the research methods in Chapter 1 of your textbook. These methods will be explained in more detail. The results presentation will also be ten minutes long. The requirements for each presentation are very specific and will be described below. How many students will we have to present to at a time? You are presenting on two different occasions: once to conduct your activity and again to present your results two weeks later. Each time you present, students will be divided into 4 groups, with approximately 3 people in each group. For the activity presentation, you will present twice, to two different groups of students. (You will plan one research activity presentation and then present it two times.) So you will present to 3 people at a time, and do that twice. Overall, you will be presenting to 6 students as well as your instructor, who will sit in on one of your activity presentations. Then the whole process will repeat when you do your results presentation. How will we be graded? Your instructor will sit in on your presentations to evaluate your work. Your peers (other students in our class) will also evaluate your work. Grading rubrics for the presentations are included below. Other students and your instructor will use these rubrics to evaluate your presentations. So make sure you pay close attention to these rubrics when you plan and practice your presentations. Each presentation (activity and results) is worth 7 points, for a total of 14 points, or 14% of your final grade. An essential element of the planning will include a multiple-choice exam on sociological research methods, which is discussed in the Exam section. This will be an online exam. Additionally, you must complete a Research Prep Worksheet (RPW) that you will use during your activity presentation. You will submit this RPW to your instructor on the day you present your research activity. You must also complete a Research Analysis Worksheet (RAW), which you must submit on the day of your second presentation. Research Planning Stage Before designing your activity, you will meet with your instructor with your group. This meeting is explained more in the section entitled “Small Group Meetings with Instructor.” During this meeting you will be able to ask questions and get help creating your activity. You must attend the pre- research meeting in order to be “approved” to present. To prepare for the Exam on Research Methods and the RPW, you must read and review pp. 20-32 in Chapter 1. In order to treat fellow students with respect, it is especially important that you familiarize yourself with the section entitled, “Ethics and Values in Sociological Research,” which is in Chapter 1 (pp. 30-32). 7
  8. 8. Also, if you need help prepping for your presentation, feel free to e-mail me via Angel. It is very important that you contact me ahead of time rather than right before something is due. In order to be “approved” to present, you must receive an 85% or higher on the Research Methods Exam. No late submissions of the exam will be accepted. You will not be allowed to present and you will receive a “0” for the activity and results presentations if you do not complete the exam, or do not receive an 85% or higher on the exam. No exceptions permitted. Study Guide for Research Methods Exam • What is the difference between a “topic” and a “problem”? • What is a hypothesis? • What are variables? • What is the difference between independent and dependent variables? • What is the difference between correlation and causation? • What are operational definitions? • How are the terms hypothesis, variables, and operational definitions related to each other? • What is the difference between an experimental and a control group? Give an example of a study that would require an experimental and control group. • What is random sampling? How can you get a random sample? • What is social location? How can it affect your choice of research questions and your interpretation of results? • What is bias in a research study? • How can you avoid bias in creating your research questions? • How can you avoid bias in the interpretation of your results? • Define and explain each of the research methods: o Survey o Participant observation o Case study o Secondary analysis o Documents o Experimentation o Unobtrusive measures • Give an example of each of the above research methods. • Why are ethics important in research studies? How can you make sure a study is ethical and treats your classmates with respect? • Explain the difference between mode, mean and median. • How are validity & reliability different? How do you know if your study is valid and reliable? • Explain each of the following theoretical perspectives: Symbolic Interactionism, Functional Analysis, and Conflict Theory. How are they different from each other? How would each perspective view a social problem differently? 8
  9. 9. Research Prep Worksheet (RPW) The RPW is intended to help you prepare and organize yourself for your Research presentation #1. It is worth 20% of your Research Presentation #1 grade. To make sure you are completing it thoroughly, you should aim for 1000 words. Research on Similar Studies Choose some of the studies on your topic in the text that you would like to research in greater detail (minimum of 2). Or you can search by topic through the St. Francis library. Professor Gondek can help you find these studies using the library’s website. Learning more about similar studies that have already been done will give you more ideas about your own project and questions you could ask. Write a brief synopsis (100 words) of each study and how the article relates to what you plan to present. This summary of the study must be in your own words. Do not copy from the abstract listed on the library’s website or from online. 200 words total Research Process Questions Please address the following questions on your RPW. This section should be 550 words. • What is the research method you were assigned to? • What is the specific activity you are planning to do? • Where did you get the idea for this activity? • What is your topic? • How did you define the problem? • Which elements of the readings did you use to plan? Give specific page numbers. • What is your social location? How did it affect your choice of topic, problem and your design of your activity? • What is your hypothesis? • What are the variables? Does your activity have independent and dependent variables? If so, what are they? If not, how could you design another type of activity that would involve independent and dependent variables? • In your hypothesis how did you differentiate between correlation and causation? • What are your operational definitions? • Do you have experimental and control groups? If yes, what are they? If not, how could you design another type of activity that would have experimental and control groups? • How did you address random sampling? • How did you avoid bias in creating your research questions? • What are the benefits and disadvantages with using the research method you chose? • How did you make sure this study was ethical and you treated your classmates with respect? • Will you use mode, mean and median to analyze your results? Why or why not? If not, how could you change your study to utilize them? • How will you know if your study is valid and reliable? 9
  10. 10. • Explain how your study might fit into one or more of the following theoretical perspectives: Symbolic Interactionism, Functional Analysis, and/or Conflict Theory. Planning Reflection Also in the RPW, you should discuss: • All the steps involved in doing the planning • Any successes or challenges you encountered along the way • What you learned from the planning • Your work with Professor Gondek: What was helpful and what could she have done better to help you plan? You should evaluate yourself (on a scale of 5-10, 5 being poor, 10 being excellent) on each of the following elements of the planning: • Research of similar studies through the St. Francis Library: Did you do thorough academic research to prepare? • Designing the research activity that you will implement in class: Do you feel confident that you designed an activity that incorporates content from the textbook and will capture student interest? • Answering the process questions: Did you fully answer all the process questions? • Reading for the week you present: Did you complete the reading for the week you are presenting? Did you include concepts from the reading in your presentation? This final section should be 250 words. Presentation #1 (Activity/Research Study) You will have 10 minutes to conduct your research study with a small group of students. You will repeat your presentation approximately 2 times. If you create handouts, make a maximum of 7 copies. You may not exceed this 10-minute time limit. This presentation is worth 7 points. If you are late or absent on the day of your presentation, you will not be allowed to make it up. You may not switch groups after you have already signed up. IMPORTANT NOTE: Before you present to a group you must make this clear to student participants: “This is a research study. The responses you give during this class period will only be used for the purposes of the learning of the students in this class. When results are conveyed, no names of specific students will be used, only general patterns will be discussed. If you do not wish to participate in any element of the activity, you are free to observe. You may also speak to the instructor if you would like to leave the classroom during any element of the research activity.” Research Methods You will be assigned to one-two of the following research methods, based on Chapter 1 – The Sociological Perspective: • Survey • Participant observation 10
  11. 11. • Case study • Secondary analysis • Documents • Experimentation • Unobtrusive measures The study should be creative and innovative and should focus on getting other students actively involved. Here are some examples of types of research studies. These examples are based on a racism/sexism topic. Your topic may be quite different, but you can use these examples to help you envision what each type of research method entails. • Survey: Play a song that portrays racism and/or sexism and then create a series of questions about the song that students can respond to with “always, sometimes, never” or “strongly agree, somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, strongly disagree.” How do students of different genders/races respond differently to these questions? • Participant observation: Give your group a prompt such as “You must get from one side of the classroom to the other as a group, but only 1/3 of the number of your hands and feet combined can be touching the ground at any one time.” You participate in the activity, but you pay attention to how the groups decide on their strategy. Which students take the lead and how do they exercise this leadership? What is the gender and race background of those who lead and those who are quiet? • Case Study: Pose a question to your group, such as “Talk about a time when you were treated unfairly because of your race and/or your gender?” Then you can observe where the conversation goes, take notes and even audio record the conversation. • Secondary Analysis: Bring in the research study on job discrimination on p. 33 and have students analyze the raw data and the authors’ analysis. Create discussion questions based on the results in the job discrimination study. • Documents: Bring in magazines such as Maxim, Cosmo, Essence, etc. and ask students to analyze the racial and gendered implications of the advertisements and articles. • Experimentation: Find a series of images of men and women of different racial backgrounds. Choose adjectives that could apply to several different pictures such as “sexy” that would be paired with a picture of a white man, an Asian man and a Latino man. Or “smart” paired with a black man, and a black woman. You would ask students to write which person matches best with that adjective. You could also collect information on the gender, race and sexuality of each student participating in the experiment, so you could evaluate the results based on the backgrounds of the participants. • Unobtrusive measures: Bring in copies of conversations on websites that serve different race- gender groups and ask the class to analyze these conversations based on sociological concepts. Outline for Presentation When you present, please follow this outline carefully: 0:00-0:01 Introduce yourself and your topic. If you want to keep your goals secret from students, you can be more vague about your topic. This 11
  12. 12. strategy would be helpful if you want to avoid your bias affecting the data you collect. You should not tell students your opinion or hypothesis at this stage. 0:01-0:05 Conduct your activity or study. Make sure your activity gets students actively involved and engaged. 0:05-0:07 Sociological Concepts/Academic Research Upon completion of the activity or study, give students information on the research you found about your topic and connections to textbook concepts. Please provide at least 3 concrete pieces of sociological information to students that relate to your study. At this point you can pass out a handout that includes this information. Please make sure to have a handout for your instructor. (Make a maximum of 7 handouts so that you don’t waste paper.) 0:07-0:09 Choose three of the following Research Process Questions to address with the group: • Where did you get the idea for this activity? • What is your social location? How did it affect your choice of topic, problem and the design of your activity? • What is your hypothesis? • What are the variables? • In your hypothesis how did you differentiate between correlation and causation? • What are your operational definitions? • How did you avoid bias in creating your research questions? 0:09-0:10 End with powerful thought, quote or statistic related to your topic 0:10-0:12 Student responses After you’ve completed your formal presentation, you are required to ask the following questions so that students who’ve participated in your group reflect on their experience. • Do you have any questions about anything I presented? • What did you learn from my presentation? • What did you like the most about my presentation? • What can I do to improve for the next time I present? Ask students to be honest with you. Grading Rubric for Research Presentation You will be graded on a 5-10 scale based on the following criteria. • Presentation incorporated concepts from that week’s readings/class discussions/films and outside academic research (40%) • Students were encouraged to be active participants. (20%) • Activity was clear, powerful and carefully planned. (10%) • Presentation was creative and innovative. (10%) • Thorough completion of RPW (20%) 12
  13. 13. To calculate your grade, I will give you a score from 5-10 for each of these criteria. A 5 is like an F, and a 10 is like an A+. I will then multiply that score by the weight (percentage) for each item. Finally I will add these together to get a score that is between 5 and 10. I will turn this into a percentage and multiply it by the points possible for the presentation (7 points). Results Stage In order to analyze your results, you must re-familiarize yourself with sociological research concepts on pp. 20-32 in Chapter 1. Especially focus on concepts related to analysis of results such as: • Validity and reliability p. 21 • Example of a table p. 22 • Different ways to measure “average” (mode, median and mean) p. 23 • Avoiding Bias p. 25 • Spurious Correlations p. 29 The first step to analyzing your results is to organize the data you collected. If this data includes numbers and percentages (quantitative), you need to create an excel spreadsheet so you can track these responses. For example if you ask students for their racial identification and then ask them their opinion on their preference for a certain picture, you will need to organize your data by “race of student” and “number of votes for each picture.” If your data is qualitative and depends more on students’ written opinions, you can organize your results by commonalities in responses. If you asked about experiences of racial discrimination and five students talked about being discriminated against at work - that would be a group of data you could bring together. Ask yourself about the trends in student responses. The next step is to create a visual representation of the results you found. This could be a graph or a table or a list of the most common statements and how many people made each statement. Please ask your instructor if you need assistance creating graphs or tables in excel. Then, you need to interpret your results. To help you do this, I have created a series of Analysis Questions. These questions, along with a series of results reflections should be submitted on the Research Analysis Worksheet (RAW). This is due the day you present your results. Research Analysis Worksheet (RAW) The RAW is intended to help you organize yourself for Presentation #2 and reflect on the analysis process. The RAW is worth 20% of your Presentation 2 grade. To give a thorough response, you should aim for 1000 words. Analysis Questions Answer these questions fully. Aim for 750 words. • Was your hypothesis proved correct or incorrect? • What do your results tell you about the correlation and/or causation between your variables? Make sure to differentiate between independent and dependent variables when you are discussing causation. If your research did not involve independent and dependent variables, explain why not and explain how they might have changed your results if they had been used. • Did you have a random sample? Why or why not? 13
  14. 14. • How might your values, judgments and background have affected your interpretation of the results? • If you had experimental and control groups, explain if your experimental group proved what you thought it would. If your research did not involve experimental and control groups, explain why not and explain how they might have changed your results if they had been used. • If your study involved quantitative data, please explain the mode, mean and median in your results. If your study involved qualitative data, please still use the term mode to discuss the most commonly occurring statements you heard. • Is your study valid and reliable? How do you know? • How is your research applicable to a current event? • Which theoretical principles does your research illuminate (Symbolic Interactionism, Functional Analysis, and/or Conflict Theory)? Explain why. • Which course concepts do your results relate to? Explain why. • How did you feel conducting this study with your peers? • How did you ensure you treated your peers ethically? Results Reflections – Aim for 250 words In your reflection on your results, you should: • Discuss all the steps involved in analyzing the results. • Talk about any successes or challenges you encountered during the initial presentation or afterward when you were analyzing your results, and what you learned from this experience. • Talk about your work with Professor Gondek. What was helpful and what could she have done better to help you conduct the research and analyze the results? • You should evaluate yourself (on a scale of 5-10, 5 being poor, 10 being excellent) on each of the following elements of the results analysis: o Research activity in class: How do you think you did when you conducted the study in small groups? Did you engage your audience? Did you connect to class readings and academic research? o Analysis of the data: How thorough were you when you compiled and analyzed the data? Did you create interesting visuals, like graphs and tables to help your audience understand your results? o Answering the analysis questions: How completely did you respond to the analysis questions? Outline for Results/Analysis Presentation You will have 10 minutes to present your results. This presentation is worth 7 points. You must be present for your presentation. No late presentations or make-ups will be permitted. In order to do this second presentation, you will have had to do the first presentation. You must bring your RAW with you on the day you do presentation #2. If you are absent or late on the day of your assigned presentation, you will not be allowed to make-up or reschedule your presentation. Please follow this detailed outline for your results presentation. 14
  15. 15. 0:00-0:02 Re-introduce yourself, your topic & your study. Remind us who you are, what you did and why. Tell us what your hypothesis was and whether it was proved correct or incorrect. Give us a summary of your results – the BIG IDEA. 0:02-0:06 Visuals – Tables, Graphs, etc. Create a visual representation of your results to help you explain them to us in more detail. You can either bring a lap top and show students the tables or graphs from your lap top, or you can provide print outs for students to share of your results. Make sure you give your instructor a copy. (Make a maximum of 7 copies, so that you don’t waste paper.) Before you tell us more about your results, ask students to read the table or graph you provide. Ask them questions about the findings. Then, focus on findings that surprised you or that proved your hypothesis. Tell us about your variables. Can you show correlation with your study and/or causation? Why or why not? Tell us about the mean, median and mode in your results. Are your results valid and reliable? How do you know? 0:07-0:09 Sociological Concepts/Current Event Now give us connections to textbook concepts and a current event. Ask students for their input on which course concepts or current events they think your project relates to. Then tell us: How and why are your findings important to us? Please provide at least 3 concrete pieces of sociological information to students that relate to your study. You must discuss at least one current event that relates to your study. At this point you can pass out a handout that includes this information. Please make sure to have a handout for your instructor. (Again, make a maximum of 7 copies to save paper.) 0:09-0:10 Summarize your findings and end with a powerful thought, quote or statistic related to these findings 0:10-0:12 Student responses After you’ve completed your formal presentation, you are required to ask the following questions so that students who’ve participated in your group reflect on their experience. • Do you have any questions about anything I presented? • What did you learn from my presentation? • What did you like the most about my presentation? • What can I do to improve for the next time I present? Ask students to be honest with you. Grading Rubric for Results/Analysis Presentation You will be graded on a 5-10 scale based on the following criteria. • Presentation incorporated concepts from readings/class discussions/films and at least 1 current event (40%) • Students were encouraged to be active participants. (20%) • Activity was clear, powerful and carefully planned. (10%) • Presentation was creative and innovative. (10%) • Thorough completion of RAW (20%) To calculate your grade, I will give you a score from 5-10 for each of these criteria. A 5 is like an F, 15
  16. 16. and a 10 is like an A+. I will then multiply that score by the weight (percentage) for each item. Finally I will add these together to get a score that is between 5 and 10. I will turn this into a percentage and multiply it by the points possible for the presentation (7 points). Grading for all elements of research presentation Presentation 1 – Research Activity (7 points) Presentation 2 – Results Analysis (7 points) Total: 14 points 16
  17. 17. Service Learning Project Purpose Just as you learned about sociological research by doing your own research project, this is your opportunity to practice the activist aspects of sociology, modeled by social reformers and sociologists like Jane Addams, Alice Paul, and Ida B. Wells. You will connect sociological concepts related to gender, race, class and sexuality to your volunteer work in community organizations. Stages Before you begin your service-learning project, you must complete and submit a Service Learning Registration Form to your instructor. This is due the second week of class (9/17). Your instructor will then submit it to the SL Office at St. Francis. The timely submission of this form is imperative because you must complete an orientation with the SL Office before you begin your SL Projects. After you complete this orientation with the SL Office, you will be able to select service sites based on your interests and schedule. You must participate in SL projects that are applicable to the theme you have been assigned to. These themes are explained in the table below. Weeks 3-7 Start Service Learning Sometime in weeks 3-7, you should begin working on your first 5 hours of service learning. If you are in Group A, you should start sooner than if you are in Group D. Make sure you always keep in mind when you will have to present. Once you’ve completed a project you should download and print a "Project History" which details where and when you served and for how long. Bring this Project History when you present your SL project (both for SL Pres. 1 and Final Presentation). You should also submit a copy of the Project History to the service learning office twice per semester. The SL Coordinator will generate a report of student participation and send it to me. If you fail to produce this evidence that you have actually completed your 10 hours of service learning, you will not receive credit for your SL presentations. This means that you will receive a 0 for this element of your grade. SL Exam In Week 6, you will need to take an exam on Angel to ensure you have mastered the knowledge necessary to connect sociological concepts to service in the community. You must earn a score of 85% or better in order to be “approved” to present your SL project. The exam will test your knowledge of the reasons some sociologists chose the activist path, social justice issues (racism, classism and sexism), and ethical considerations when doing service-learning projects. Instructor Meeting #2 During weeks 6-9, you will meet with your instructor with your group for the second time. This meeting is explained more in the section entitled “Small Group Meetings with Instructor.” During this meeting you will be able to ask questions and get help with your SL presentation. You must attend the pre-SL meeting in order to be “approved” to present your SL project. Weeks 8-11 SL Presentation #1 You should complete 5 hours of Service Learning by the time you present your SL project for the first 17
  18. 18. time. This date will vary depending on which you group you are in. See the table below for the full schedule. Before the end of the semester, you should complete your remaining 5 hours of Service Learning. You will present on these hours of SL experience when you complete the Final Exam Presentation. Group A Group B Group C Group D Meeting #2 w/instructor 10/15 10/22 10/29 11/5 Service Learning Presentation (1) Week 8: Gender Identity 10/29 Week 9: Racial-Ethnic Identity 11/5 Week 10: Family Relationships 11/19 Week 11: Activism (Civil/Human rights & homelessness) 12/3 Project sites When you choose a group, you choose not only a research project topic but also a service-learning theme. This theme will be used to create a list of possible SL projects. The SL Office has over 100 different projects available. You can select sites and activities that match your interests and schedule (as long as you adhere to your assigned theme). Projects are offered in all five boroughs during the morning, afternoon and evening, and are located near a subway station. The following sample SL opportunity (provided by the St. Francis SL Office) might fit into Group D’s homelessness theme or Group C’s family theme. This organization serves homeless children and families. Name of project: Liberty Street Residence Read to Me Location: Brooklyn-Brownsville Time: 10:45 AM - 2:00 PM Description of service: Help homeless children in Brooklyn increase their love of literature by spending time at the neighborhood library branch. Organization: Liberty Avenue, a transitional housing facility for families. Goal: Be part of a team of volunteers that helps the children check out and read books. The afternoon concludes with a fun literacy building activity. Number of volunteers needed: 10 Key Word = Read to Me Service Learning Exam Study Guide Review the following pages and articles in preparation for the SL Exam due by 10/14. “Difficult Stories: Service-Learning, Race, Class, and Whiteness” by Ann Green (on Angel under Lessons, in Readings folder) Analyzing society vs. reform: “Sociology in North America” pp. 9-13 Male privilege: “Fighting back: The Rise of Feminism” p. 241-243 “The Conflict Perspective: Class conflict and scarce resources” p. 200-202 18
  19. 19. “Social class in the United States” p. 203-209 Institutional Racism: “Individual and Institutional Discrimination,” pp. 271-273 & “Down to Earth Sociology: Stealth Racism in the Rental Market” p. 290 MySocLab Ch. 7 Multi-Media Library Social Explorer Maps: Income Inequality by Race & Gender Stratification MySocLab Ch. 8 Multi-Media Library Listen: NPR Women’s Pay Disparity SL Presentation During weeks 8-11 you will present to small groups of students about your experiences with your service-learning project. You will present twice. You only need to prepare one presentation (this will be repeated). If you make handouts, you should make a maximum of 7 copies. Bring the “project history” you printed out to class the day you present, so that you will have proof of your service. • You should tell us in detail about your social location compared to the social locations of the people you worked with during your SL projects. You should also give us in-depth descriptions of what you’ve been doing, how people in the organization and people you have served have responded to you and what you’ve learned so far (30%). • Make sure to incorporate at least five concepts from your week’s readings into your presentation (30%). • Give us specific information about the mission of the organization you are working with and give students ways they can get more involved (10%). • Find ways to involve the class in your presentation (20%). • Speak clearly and passionately (10%). You will have 10 minutes to present. 8 points possible If you are absent or late on the day of your assigned presentation, you will not be allowed to make-up or reschedule your presentation. I will calculate your grade the same way I calculate all other grades (see descriptions above). Outline of SL Presentation Please follow this outline when you present. 0:00-0:01 Introduce yourself and your service-learning project What is your social location? How do you identify in terms of race, class, gender, sexuality, etc? What are the social locations of the people you worked with? Give us the big picture of the SL project you did. What was the project you worked on? 0:01-0:02 Tell us about the organization you are working with: What is their mission? Who do they work with? What social justice issues are important to them? How do they do their work? Why is their work important? How do they view volunteers? How do they treat the people they are “servicing”? MySocLab Ch. 7 Recommended Reading: “Some Principles of Stratification” by Melvin Tumin 19
  20. 20. 0:02-0:06 Your experience Give us details about what exactly you’ve been doing with your SL project, what you’ve learned, challenges you’ve faced, and how the people in the organization have responded to you. Do you feel you’ve made any impact? Have you served the community in an important way? Why or why not? Evaluate the effectiveness of the SL project(s) you’ve worked on. Do these projects actually “help”? Ask other students to share their similar experiences. 0:06-0:09 Course connection Connect what you’ve learned to sociological concepts from the readings from that week (at least 5). Think about how underlying structural inequalities (racism, classism, sexism) cause the social problems that these organizations are trying to address. You can provide a handout as a visual to help explain these concepts (7 copies max). Ask students to contribute additional course connections. 0:09-0:10 Getting more involved Give students information (included on handout you provide) on how to get more involved with this organization or similar organizations. 0:10-0:12 Student responses After you’ve completed your formal presentation, you are required to ask the following questions so that students who’ve participated in your group reflect on their experience. • Do you have any questions about anything I presented? • What did you learn from my presentation? • What did you like the most about my presentation? • What can I do to improve for the next time I present? Ask students to be honest with you. Grading and Due Dates SL presentation #1 During weeks 8-11 (8 points) For exact date please see schedule listed above Final Presentation about Service Learning Project (10 points) Due date is Final Exam day You must provide proof of service; otherwise you will receive a zero for both presentations. Total: 18 points 20
  21. 21. Exams and Evaluation There are a total of seven exams, six quizzes and a Final presentation. There is also an evaluation of our course. MySocLab Exams There will be five exams you must complete on MySocLab: Chapters 1, 7, 8, 9 and 10. The exams on MySocLab will test your knowledge of assigned readings. They are multiple-choice tests. Each exam is worth 5 points, for a total of 20. You will have one week to complete MySocLab exams and will be allowed only one attempt. Since these exams will be completed at home, you are welcome to use your books, notes, as well as consult with other students if you choose. This DOES NOT give you permission to take the test and then GIVE the answers to other students or to expect other students to do this for you. However, you can work on the exams with other students, discussing the questions and answers and deciding as a group, or in a pair, which answers you feel are the best for the questions. Feel free to take the Pre and Post tests for practice, before you take the Chapter Exams. These pre and post tests are designed to be learning tools and you can use them to help you better understand the readings and class concepts. However, to get credit, you must take the Chapter Exam assigned, not the pre or post tests. Research Methods and Service Learning Exam You will also have to take a Research Methods Exam and a Service Learning Exam before beginning each project. These tests will be available on Angel. They are multiple-choice tests. You are required to earn at least an 85% on these exams before moving on to the next phase of the projects. You may only take the exams once. You will have the whole week before the exam is due to take it. For more specific information on these exams, please see the sections of the syllabus entitled “Research Presentation” and “Service Learning.” (5 points each, 10 points total) Oral Quizzes There will also be 6 Oral in-class quizzes that will serve to test your understanding of weekly readings and create conversation about key concepts. You will be asked open-ended questions that will require you to integrate information from reading and class lectures. These quizzes will sometimes be given in a game-style format called White Elephant. These oral quizzes are pop-quizzes meaning you do not know when they will occur. This will require you to always be prepared by doing your assigned reading before class and reviewing key concepts multiple times to ensure mastery. (1 point each, 6 points total) The Final The Final Exam will be the final presentation of the SL project with a focus on connecting service learning experiences to key concepts from the semester. You will need to connect to at least 10 concepts from the semester (each one from a different week). The final presentation will have a similar format to the SL Presentation #1. The difference is that you will be presenting on your second 5 hours of service learning and you will be connecting to 10 concepts instead of 5. The presentation will be 10 minutes long. (10 points) Exam Schedule Online exams must be completed on Friday night before Saturday class. Deadline is midnight Friday. 21
  22. 22. MySocLab Exam 1: 9/23 Chapter 1 Sociological Perspectives and Research Research Methods Exam: 9/30 (on Angel) MySocLab Exam 2: 10/7 Chapter 7 Social Stratification (Class-based oppression) SL Exam: 10/14 MySocLab Exam 3: 10/28 Chapter 8 Gender MySocLab Exam 4: 11/4 Chapter 9 Race & Ethnicity MySocLab Exam 5: 11/18 Chapter 10 Family Final Exam: SL Final Presentation, during final exam period, probably on 12/17 Evaluation The evaluation gives you a chance to reflect on your experience in this class and make suggestions for improvements. You will complete the evaluation on Angel by 12/10. (3 points) 22

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