Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.
1. Introduction
Food tree products, including fruits and nuts, contribute
substantially to income generation and food and ...
Próxima SlideShare
Cargando en…5
×

Kehlenbeck etal2015 fruittreeportfoliosvitaminsupplymachakos

616 visualizaciones

Publicado el

Can cultivation of ‘fruit tree portfolios’ contribute to farmer families’ year-round vitamin supply? Evidence from Eastern Kenya. By Katja Kehlenbeck, Stepha McMullin, Ken Njogu, Parveen Anjarwalla, Esther Karanja-Kamau, Ramni Jamnadass

Publicado en: Alimentación
  • Sé el primero en comentar

  • Sé el primero en recomendar esto

Kehlenbeck etal2015 fruittreeportfoliosvitaminsupplymachakos

  1. 1. 1. Introduction Food tree products, including fruits and nuts, contribute substantially to income generation and food and nutrition security of local communities. Fruit and nuts with their high contents in vitamins and other nutrients are useful for diversification of monotonous starchy staple-based diets. Fruit trees can provide year round products for consumption and sale, if diverse sets of species with different harvest times are cultivated on farms. Objectives of the study: a) To develop ‘fruit tree portfolios’ that provide fresh fruits to farmer families and markets during the whole year. b) To test if fruit tree portfolios can deliver fruits rich in vitamin C and provitamin A year-round. 4. Conclusions and Way Forward  Existing fruit tree diversity can be arranged in ‘fruit tree portfolios’ for year-round supply of fresh fruits.  Growing a minimum of eight fruit tree species per farm can potentially supply vitamin-rich fruits during the whole year.  Indigenous fruit species need to be promoted for cultivation, and planting material should be made available to farmers.  This study will help to develop ‘tailored’, site-specific interventions for increasing production and consumption of fruits to improve dietary diversity and nutrition of farming HHs. Poster presented at the 2nd Hidden Hunger Conference, Stuttgart, Germany, 3-6 March 2015. Figure 1: Map of the research are in Machakos County, Eastern Kenya, showing AEZs and sample locations. Figure 2: Farms with pawpaw and mango trees in Machakos County, Eastern Kenya. Figure 3: Fruits (above) and young tree (right) of Van- gueria madagascariensis. Figure 4: Young fruits of Azanza garckeana. Legend Sample locations in: LM3 LM4 UM3 UM4 LM4 UM4 UM3 LM3 Machakos County Can cultivation of ‘fruit tree portfolios’ contribute to farmer families’ year-round vitamin supply? Evidence from Eastern Kenya Katja Kehlenbeck, Stepha McMullin, Ken Njogu, Parveen Anjarwalla, Esther Karanja-Kamau, Ramni Jamnadass World Agroforestry Centre ICRAF, Tree Diversity, Domestication and Delivery, Nairobi, Kenya Contact: K.Kehlenbeck@cgiar.org 2. Material and Methods  300 households (HHs) were randomly selected in four agro- ecological zones (AEZs) along an altitude and rainfall gradient in Machakos County, Eastern Kenya (Fig. 1).  HHs were interviewed on basic socio-economic data, food insecurity periods and occurrence of fruit trees on farms.  Focus group discussions were performed with four farmer groups to identify harvest times of important fruit species.  Vitamin C and provitamin A contents were assessed for each fruit species (based on Tanzania Food Composition Tables, USDA National Nutrient Database).  Harvest calendars and nutritional information were combined to identify best species combinations for year-round fruit supply. 3. Results and Discussion 3.1 Basic farm and fruit tree species richness data  Mean farm size was 1.4 ha and mean HH size 5 members.  A total of 52 fruit tree species, including 26 indigenous and 26 exotic species, were documented.  Most frequent species were mango (Fig. 2), occurring on 92% of the farms, pawpaw (Fig. 2) on 65% and avocado on 54% of the farms, all of exotic origin.  Most frequent indigenous species were Vangueria mada- gascariensis (present on 23% of the farms; Fig. 3) and Azanza garckeana (22% presence; Fig. 4). 3.2 HH food security and fruit supply  Households were most food insecure from August to December with a peak in October, (almost 80% of respondents were food insecure).  A combination of different on-farm fruit species could provide year-round harvest of different fresh fruits (Fig. 5). 3.3 (Pro)vitamin-rich fruit species Vitamin C  Nine fruit species with moderate to very high content (Fig. 5).  Three species (pawpaw, orange/lemon and desert date) could cover year-round supply. Provitamin A  Seven fruits with medium to very high content.  Three species (pawpaw, waterberry and choco- late berry; Fig. 6) could cover year-round supply. 3.4 Recommended fruit tree portfolio On each of the farms, the following 8-13 fruit tree species should be grown for ensuring supply to farmers’ families of fresh, nutrient- rich fruits during the whole year:  Pawpaw, mango, loquat, mulberry, waterberry, custard apple, guava, white sapote, lemon, orange, chocolate berry, passion fruit and desert date. Figure 6: Fruits of waterberry (Syzygium cuminii, left) and fruits and leaves of chocolate berry (Vitex doniana (species very similar to Vitex payos), right). This research was funded by EC/IFAD under the project ‘Fruiting Africa’ from 2013-2015. www. http://database.prota.org Photo K. Kehlenbeck Photo K. Kehlenbeck Photo K. Kehlenbeck Photo K. Kehlenbeck Photos Ken Njogu Figure 5: Food security levels of 300 smallholder HHs and the harvest periods for the most important exotic and indigenous (in italics) fruits. Map Ken Njogu

×