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SCULPTURES

types of SCULPTURE
SCULPTURE in gardens

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SCULPTURES

  1. 1. LANDSCAPE DESIGN SCULPTURE PRESENTED TO: AR ANSHU DADHWAL
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION TO SCULPTURE A BRIEF HISTORY
  3. 3. SCULPTURE IS DEFINED, IT IS MORE THAN JUST A THREE DIMENSIONAL OBJECT. 3 FUNDAMENTALS MUST BE PRESENT: •Form: The configuration the idea takes whether recognizable or not that demonstrates skillful use of elements and principles. •Content: The emotion, passion or message the sculptor intends to convey and how the viewer interacts with the piece. •Technique: The sculptor’s ability to effectively use materials and tools. Craftsmanship.
  4. 4. FORM CONTENT TECHNIQUE
  5. 5. DESIGN PRINCIPLES  Proportion – relative relationship of shapes to one another
  6. 6.  REPETITION – Rhythm, harmony, variation WHENEVER YOU HAVE AN ELEMENT THAT OCCURS MULTIPLE TIMES DESIGN PRINCIPLES
  7. 7.  ARTICULATION– • articulation is how the different parts of the sculpture seem to be joined together • Manner by which we move from one element to the next (how the artist has repeated, varied, harmonized, & related its parts and the movement from one part to DESIGN PRINCIPLES
  8. 8.  FOCAL AREA Sculptors, like painters or any other visual artists, must concern themselves with drawing our eye to those areas of their work that are central to what they wish to communicate. DESIGN PRINCIPLES
  9. 9.  BALANCE – Biomorphic / geometric forms ASYMMETRICAL BALANCESYMMETRICAL BALANCE DESIGN PRINCIPLES
  10. 10. DIFFERENT TYPES OF SCULPTURE
  11. 11. DIFFERENT TYPES OF SCULPTURE RELIEF OR RELIEVO - is a sculptural technique. the term relief is from the latin verb levo, to raise. to create a sculpture in relief is to give the impression that the sculpted material has been raised above the background plane. BAS-RELIEF OR LOW RELIEF HIGH RELIEF
  12. 12. DIFFERENT TYPES OF SCULPTURE SUNK RELIEF - sunk or sunken relief is largely restricted to the art of ancient Egypt. COUNTER RELIEF sunk relief technique is not to be confused with "counter-relief" or intaglio as seen on engraved gem seals — where an image is fully modelled in a "negative" manner. the image goes into the surface, so that when impressed on wax it gives an impression in normal relief.
  13. 13. DIFFERENT TYPES OF SCULPTURE FREE STANDING SCULPTURE - also known as sculpture in- the-round, likely represents the form of sculpture most recognizable to modern people. - is any work of sculpture which can be viewed from any angle around the pedestal. this kind of sculpture includes some of the most famous works of sculpture throughout time: the statuary works of the greek, roman, medieval and classical eras, including michaelangelo's david.
  14. 14. FREE STANDING SCULPTURE
  15. 15. DIFFERENT TYPES OF SCULPTURE KINETIC SCULPTURE - is free-standing sculpture that moves, either by mechanical power or under the power of wind or water. fountains are a form of kinetic sculpture, although in that special case the sculpture is not powered by the water but lives within the shapes and forms of the water as it arcs over and through the air.
  16. 16. DIFFERENT TYPES OF SCULPTURE ASSEMBLAGE SCULPTURE -another more modern form of sculpture is known as assemblage sculpture, which is sculpture pieced together from found or scavenged items that have little or no relationship to one another. -Assemblage art is "non-traditional sculpture, made from re-combining found objects. -Some of these objects are junk from the streets." these pieced-together bits of castoff debris are arranged in an aesthetically pleasing shape to the artist and then presented to its audiences to provoke thought and reaction.
  17. 17. SCULPTURAL ART ELEMENTS NEGATIVE SPACE COLOR MASS (LITERAL)
  18. 18. SCULPTURAL ART ELEMENTS TEXTURE
  19. 19. GARDEN SCULPTURE Outdoor sculpture cannot be viewed as separate from its surrounding environment. In this respect, when chosen carefully and sited sympathetically, a garden sculpture can enhance a garden and give emphasis to design and plantings throughout the year.
  20. 20. GARDEN SCULPTURE THEMES AND FEELING – WHICH SCULPTURE IN WHICH GARDEN From this sketchy history, one can begin to discover a pattern evolving in contemporary sculpture sited in private gardens or sculpture parks: 1.The sculpture can be the protagonist and focus of a garden, with the garden serving as a suitable stage to present it to its best advantage; 2.the sculpture is an equal partner with the garden, contributing towards its appearance together with plants, paths, hedges or flowerbeds; 3.the garden is the sculpture
  21. 21. GARDEN SCULPTURE POSITIONING THE SCULPTURE IN THE GARDEN HIEGHT • The height of a sculpture, in relation to the eye-level of the viewer, and of the height of other plants and sculptures is a crucial aspect of siting. • Obviously this cannot be perfectly controlled, as the eye level varies depending on body height (between 1.40 and 1.80m), and changes with the laws of perspective as you approach the work. Looking up at a sculpture Looking straight at it, eye to eye Looking down produces an element of discovery
  22. 22. GARDEN SCULPTURE POSITIONING THE SCULPTURE IN THE GARDEN PLINTH • A plinth provides the practical means to regulate height of a sculpture, and can be fabricated from wood, metal, or stone. • There are solid plinths , made from wood or stone, or more fine and less visually intrusive supports made from steel.
  23. 23. If the sculpture rests on the grass, it gives a more casual impression: symbolically, the sculpture shares the same ground as humans, animals and garden; it grows from the earth that also nurtures the vegetation GARDEN SCULPTURE POSITIONING THE SCULPTURE IN THE GARDEN LAWN
  24. 24. GARDEN SCULPTURE SPACE AND PERSPECTIVE Manipulating closeness and distance to the sculpture through garden design is an important tool in controlling the viewer’s experience of it. The impact of a sculpture is made up of all the different views onto it, varying in angles and distance.
  25. 25. GARDEN SCULPTURE SCALE • Chosing the right position is really a matter of scale :the smallest sculpture suitable for the outdoors might be 50 cm high, on a plinth in a narrow courtyard or the above mentioned “green caves”. • Larger or even monumental sculptures need more space. • As the size increases, the location escalates from open lawns, still protected and enclosed by trees
  26. 26. GARDEN SCULPTURE FRONTAL OR ROUND STYLE – (IN)FORMAL Formal gardens often surround historic buildings, and involve box hedges, straight flower borders, steps, terraces, walls and shingled, often straight paths. This issue of space relates to how a sculpture can be viewed: either frontally or in the round – in the pictorial or sculptural mode.
  27. 27. GARDEN SCULPTURE FOCUS SURFACE – TEXTURE AND PATTERN Garden designers often use a sculpture as a focal point. A focus slows down the journey through the garden by stopping and directing the gaze, as well as the feet traversing through its expanse. The garden is slowly discovered rather than swept through superficially; this enlarges the garden, • Texture – the surface material quality – is a crucial aesthetic dimension of both garden design and sculpture. It is explored through touch, but also visually: • Texture in relation to sculpture varies depending on material, and the use of tools
  28. 28. GARDEN SCULPTURE LIGHT AND SHADE • sculpture above is divided into shaded and sunlit areas, in places quite randomly against the grain of the form. • Other shadows just simply swallow the form, and render it invisible and flat. • The overall impression is of a figure part clearly and three dimensionally perceived, part merged with its dark background
  29. 29. GARDEN SCULPTURE COLOUR Colour in sculpture and plants is yet another means of manipulating the space, and directing the visitors attention: depth can be created, or flatness simulated. Warm colours like reds, yellows and oranges seem to advance and can make an object seem closer to you. Cool colours like greens and blues seem to move away . Complementary colours attract one another (red to green, blue to orange, yellow to purple), and attention from the viewer. Bright colours stand out against more grey or toned down colours.
  30. 30. THANKYOU! PRESENTED BY :- 10610, 10634,11617, 11631, 11639 NIT HAMIRPUR (H.P.)

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  • RichardFletcher1

    Apr. 29, 2016
  • LiliaLoval

    May. 23, 2020

types of SCULPTURE SCULPTURE in gardens

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