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Agile Product Management - Co-Training with Angel Medinilla (c)

Agile Product Management course as part of the Agile Kaizen (c) training portfolio.

See more at
http://www.proyectalis.com/AgileKaizen/
www.leanadvantage.co.uk

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Agile Product Management - Co-Training with Angel Medinilla (c)

  1. 1. London, march 2015 Agile product management
  2. 2. Angel Medinilla angel.medinilla@proyectalis.com www.proyectalis.com/en/AngelMedinilla (Slides, Videos, Newsletter, Books, Blog, LinkedIn, Sketchnotes, Twitter...) Twitter: @angel_m (would love some instant feedback!) <vanity>
  3. 3. www.leanadvantage.co.uk
  4. 4. our Pleasure! </vanity>
  5. 5. Some logistics Time shcedule? Lunch? Restrooms? water? snakcs? Pictures? LAptops, ipads CHECK: FEEDBACK DOOR, RESOURCES BOARD, KUDOS BOARD, insights board
  6. 6. Free shoulder pain test - Can you all rise your right (or left) hand?
  7. 7. Who do we have here today?
  8. 8. AVENGERS: ASSEMBLE!
  9. 9. product metrics Course structure Kaizen culture Customer-focused product definition Product Development via build-measure- learn Kaizen enablers agile kaizen intro Metrics & goals actionable metrics funnel metrics product management & product development traditional vs. agile pm process defining opportunities: customer, problem, solution validating your assumptions: MVE, MVP, MMFS communicating your vision: product strategy & scope defining your product: structure & stories managing your backlogusing model canvas to gather your assumptions Kaizen events
  10. 10. product metrics exercise: what do you want to learn? Kaizen culture Customer-focused product definition Product Development via build-measure- learn Kaizen enablers agile kaizen intro Metrics & goals actionable metrics funnel metrics product management & product development traditional vs. agile pm process defining opportunities: customer, problem, solution validating your assumptions: MVE, MVP, MMFS communicating your vision: product strategy & scope defining your product: structure & stories managing your backlogusing model canvas to gather your assumptions Kaizen events
  11. 11. product metrics Course structure Kaizen culture Customer-focused product definition Product Development via build-measure- learn Kaizen enablers agile kaizen intro Metrics & goals actionable metrics funnel metrics product management & product development traditional vs. agile pm process defining opportunities: customer, problem, solution validating your assumptions: MVE, MVP, MMFS communicating your vision: product strategy & scope defining your product: structure & stories managing your backlogusing model canvas to gather your assumptions Kaizen events
  12. 12. Agile kaizen what’s kaizen Kaizen / kaikaku
  13. 13. Agile kaizen kaizen culture Team / people kaizen process kaizen product kaizen
  14. 14. Agile kaizen Culture: noble cause, values, behaviors, artifacts story telling cultural enablers / failure causes
  15. 15. kaizen enablers • Purpose: show them a noble cause, a global purpose beyond profits, company growth, and stakeholder wealth. Be open to change for the sake of a greater purpose. • Learning and Long-term vision: people must be conscious of the effects of investment over time and the expected better state. Learning must be a real priority. Short-term urgencies must not seriously impact strategic goals. • Whole system approach: Show them the whole picture and avoid the temptation of suboptimization. Be able to see root causes of the problems, not just their symptoms. • Constant communication and sustained effort: in all ways, not just from managers to employees. Communication is part of our work, not just additional work. Continuous improvement must be sustained on a continuous base, not just on occasional events. • Quality first: technical debt will cost more in the future than the cost of building quality into the product up front. • Courage and the absence of fear: Everyone should be able to point at what they consider to be an impediment, a defect, or an 
 improvement opportunity. • Transparency: people should be able to question everything. Every trace of a ‘blame game’ culture must be eradicated. Internal politics 
 and personalñ agendas shouldn’t drive company decisions. • Empowerment and ownership: improving the system is everybody’s job. Ownership also means responsibility and accountability. Have 
 enough resources to improve. • Teamwork and self-organization: empowered individuals should actively seek to collaborate with each other. Teams should be able to 
 plan and execute for improvement. • Respect and Recognition: use constructive feedback and, especially, give recognition for individual and team contributions to company 
 improvement. 

  16. 16. exercise: kaizen enablers • Purpose • Learning and Long-term vision • Whole system approach • Constant communication and sustained effort • Quality first •Courage and the absence of fear • Transparency • Empowerment and ownership • Teamwork and self- organization •Respect and Recognition
  17. 17. Kaizen events Different kinds retrospectives 10 rules for good retrospectives retrospective canvas
  18. 18. exercise: product retrospective
  19. 19. exercise: product retrospective Things we liked: maximize impediments: remove or reduce ideas, things to try Kudos! Last retrospective plan: what we tried, how were the results New plan: 4 - 5 things we are going to try, detailed as a plan
  20. 20. product metrics Course structure Kaizen culture Customer-focused product definition Product Development via build-measure- learn Kaizen enablers agile kaizen intro Metrics & goals actionable metrics funnel metrics product management & product development traditional vs. agile pm process defining opportunities: customer, problem, solution validating your assumptions: MVE, MVP, MMFS communicating your vision: product strategy & scope defining your product: structure & stories managing your backlogusing model canvas to gather your assumptions Kaizen events
  21. 21. EXERCISE: PROduct management What’s product Management? HOW DO YOU DECIDE WHAT TO BUILD? HOW DO YOU KNOW WHEN ARE YOU READY TO START BUILDING?
  22. 22. PROduct management The “requirements gathering era”
  23. 23. PROduct management The “requirements gathering era”
  24. 24. PROduct management The “requirements gathering era”
  25. 25. PROduct management The “requirements gathering era”
  26. 26. PROduct management The “requirements gathering era”
  27. 27. PROduct management The “requirements gathering era”
  28. 28. PROduct management Faster horses - Product Death Cycle (david j. bland) Nobody uses our product Ask customer what features Are missing Build missing features
  29. 29. PROduct management Faster horses - Product Death Cycle (david j. bland) Nobody uses our product Ask customer what features Are missing Build missing features Junk garage syndrome!
  30. 30. PROduct management PRODUCT MANAGEMENT VS PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT The visionary myth
  31. 31. PROduct management faster? more? - MAXIMIZE OUTCOME, NOT OUTPUT the terrible truth Too few features Too many features Magic features Meh... hate them sweet spot ++$$ ++t ++Risk
  32. 32. Agile product development old style project management closed projects - All or nothing
  33. 33. Agile product development “Project driven development”
  34. 34. Agile product development Shared understanding - learn the context collaboration, communication, conversations early and frequent delivery of valuable product increments adapting to change Continuous improvement
  35. 35. Agile product development iterative and incremental development
  36. 36. Agile product development iterative and incremental development Not “half baked cake”!!
  37. 37. exercise (20 min) Agile is better / more effective / more efficient than waterfall because... waterfall is better / more effective / more efficient than Agile because...
  38. 38. Agile product development client-vendor anti-pattern: from waiters to doctors
  39. 39. Agile product development cross functional collaboration COLLABORATIVE WORKSHOPS VS MEETINGS valuable, feasible, usable keep conversations happening
  40. 40. Agile product development the product management / core discovery team
 “the three amigos” - triads
  41. 41. Agile product development the product management / core discovery team

  42. 42. lean startup the black hole in agility
  43. 43. lean startup Basically: be sure there’s a market that wants your product, before you build it Problems users have Problems R&D team solves ???
  44. 44. lean startup customer development build-measure-learn validated learning assumptions and pivots
  45. 45. Start with a Vision “Organize world's information, make it universally accessible” “Find and discover anything you might want to buy online” “ (Be) Worldwide Authority on Kids, Families and Fun” “Be #1 car company in America & one of the great American brands” “(Find) my iPhone” “Flirt with people near me” “File too big for email” “Put a Man on the moon and back alive before 1970” “Run your own hospital online”
  46. 46. Vision: verb, target, outcome “Organize world's information, make it universally accessible” “Find and discover anything you might want to buy online” “ (Be) Worldwide Authority on Kids, Families and Fun” “Be #1 car company in America & one of the great American brands” “(Find) my iPhone” “Flirt with people near me” “File too big for email” “Put a Man on the moon and back alive before 1970” “Run your own hospital online”
  47. 47. Vision: make it about your customer “Organize world's information, make it universally accessible” “Find and discover anything you might want to buy online” “ (Be) Worldwide Authority on Kids, Families and Fun” “Be #1 car company in America & one of the great American brands” “(Find) my iPhone” “Flirt with people near me” “File too big for email” “Put a Man on the moon and back alive before 1970” “Run your own hospital online”
  48. 48. Exercise: 20 minutes craft your company / department / product / project / team / course group’s vision verb, target, outcome use words, pictures, metaphors, stories memorable, relevant, client focused, ambitious, feasible, tangible, time bound...
  49. 49. pm “process” Capture opportunities (canvas) select / prioritize opportunities (executive board) validate opportunities (core discovery team) schedule opportunities (portfolio management) deep-define opportunities (inception) break down opportunities (grooming) execute opportunities (backlog) validate opportunities (demo)
  50. 50. pm “process”
  51. 51. pm “process”
  52. 52. Strategy meeting Strategy meeting Portfolio Management - portfolio review meetings projects to be launched vision, goals, priorities…..
  53. 53. Strategy meeting Strategy meeting Portfolio Management - portfolio review meetings sprint Planning, grooming, demo release planning - product review vision, goals, priorities….. projects to be launched Business epics Business epics storiesstoriesstories stories
  54. 54. Strategy meeting Strategy meeting Portfolio Management - portfolio review meetings sprint Planning, grooming, demo release planning - product review projects to be launched vision, goals, priorities….. Business epics Business epics storiesstories storiesstories
  55. 55. Opportunies project-product-problem space
  56. 56. Opportunies project-product-problem space *
  57. 57. Opportunies Dude’s Law understand customers and users understand problems and envision solutions validate completeness
  58. 58. Opportunies frame ideas through conversations craft a vision mile wide, inch deep PLAN AHEAD (1-2 WEEK FOR 3-5 MONTHS)
  59. 59. opportunity canvas (C) Jeff Patton - “User story mapping”
  60. 60. Business Model Generation Canvas (C) alex osterwalder Partners Costs Revenues Activities Resources Value Clients Channels Relationship
  61. 61. Value proposition canvas (C) alex osterwalder
  62. 62. Lean canvas (C) ash maurya
  63. 63. opportunities: Design thinking Empathize: understand your users define: frame the problem Ideation: brainstorm, generate ideas prototyping: physical form. show, don’t tell test: validate and refine
  64. 64. opportunities: Design thinking Empathize: user personas, impact mapping, empathy maps, user journeys, interviews…….. define: research, root cause analysis, journey maps ideation: brainstorm, reverse, break the pattern, get a rule out, impose constraints... prototyping: story boards, low.fi prototype... test: mvp, poll, smoke test Resource: bootcamp bootleg
  65. 65. EXErcise: opportunity canvas (C) Jeff Patton - “User story mapping”
  66. 66. product metrics Course structure Kaizen culture Customer-focused product definition Product Development via build-measure- learn Kaizen enablers agile kaizen intro Metrics & goals actionable metrics funnel metrics product management & product development traditional vs. agile pm process defining opportunities: customer, problem, solution validating your assumptions: MVE, MVP, MMFS communicating your vision: product strategy & scope defining your product: structure & stories managing your backlogusing model canvas to gather your assumptions Kaizen events
  67. 67. Assumptions! Core assumptions customer-problem-solution elevator pitch first stage validation validate vs. confirm
  68. 68. User assumption User centered design “the user” users and customers Fine grain roles relationships user personas orgzonas
  69. 69. user persona
  70. 70. user persona
  71. 71. Exercise: user persona
  72. 72. assumptions persona = assumption you are not your customer personas: doing it wrong research and validate - interview, observe…….. keep personas at the center of your conversations
  73. 73. validating your assumptions pre-MVP validation (TTYFU) POST-MVP Validation (TTYFU) iterate your assumptions using a product
  74. 74. Video: nordstrom innovation labs
  75. 75. mve / mvp minimum is less than minimum create value Now what about “all or nothing”? product is not product - Mve mvp vs mmfs mvp vs quality
  76. 76. validation: goal modelling define key outcomes and results how can we tell we are successfull? how would busines change? define key metrics for each goal
  77. 77. EXERCISE: MVE SEVILLE’S HOTEL STORY….
  78. 78. PIVOT Select riskiest assumptions Run experiment if wrong: pivot one of your assumptions celebrate learning: learn, not launch
  79. 79. Some MVES / mvps - Simple prototype - HiFi prototype (MockUps) - Brochure, Slides, Storyboards - Survey - Wizard of Oz (Flinstoning, concierge ) - Flash video - Smoke test / 404 - A/B testing, Sub-set testing - Batching - Outsourcing - Walled garden - Alpha environment
  80. 80. Validation board
  81. 81. mvp problems - confirmation bias - false negative - all or nothing - visionary complex - too busy to learn - needs more quality / features
  82. 82. opportunity —> Product Validated! Product - market fit core vision defined core assumptions tested: customer, PROBLEM, solution.. now, let’s build it! if the development team has still not been involved, now it’s time!
  83. 83. garrett ux stack strategy: product vision, concept, main actors, goals, use context... scope: specific roles and journeys<- first epics structure: workflows, sitemaps, navigation, tasks skeleton: UX, interface, user flow, user interaction surface: look and feel, design
  84. 84. - Why are we here? - Vision / Pitch - Product Box - What it’s NOT - Meet your neighbours / Project community - Show the solution strategy - scope: inception deck - What doesn’t let us sleep - Estimate size - Trade-offs - How long it’s going to take Resource “The agile samurai”
  85. 85. Why are we doing this? what are the goals? who can make it? who can stop it? who can help? how can we change people’s behavior? how can they help? how can they stop us? what can we do to reach our goals? what can we deliver? strategy - scope: impact map
  86. 86. strategy - scope: impact map
  87. 87. strategy - scope: impact map
  88. 88. strategy-scope: goal modelling define key outcomes and results how can we tell we are successfull? how would busines change? define key metrics for each goal
  89. 89. strategy-scope: metrix matrix management 3.0 add several stakeholder views add several project dimensions measure different perspectives perspective) dimension) s"ckies' ac"ons' evals' cycle'"me' views' 1.) Time) 2.) Tools) 3.) People) 4.) Value) 5.) Functionality) 6.) Quality) 7.) Process) happy' 1. Employee) 2. Team) 3. Organization) 4. Customer) 5. Manager) 6. Supplier) 7. Community)
  90. 90. scope: user personas
  91. 91. scope: user journeys
  92. 92. scope - structure: story boards
  93. 93. structure: story maps Jeff Patton (httP://slideshare.net/nashjain/user-story-mapping)
  94. 94. Structure: story maps Remember this slide? Not “half baked cake”!!
  95. 95. structure: story maps Jeff Patton (httP://slideshare.net/nashjain/user-story-mapping)
  96. 96. structure: story maps Jeff Patton (httP://slideshare.net/nashjain/user-story-mapping)
  97. 97. structure: story maps walking skeleton end-to-end vs. module-based good, better, best see it work - make it better - make it releseable group stories in themes (release, component, track, activity...) show progres on map
  98. 98. exercise: story map - what did you do this morning to arrive at work? - break stories down - What about other days? - identify themes (clothes, hygiene, breakfast...) - What could be included / excluded? what could be done differently? - What if something went wrong? - explore minimum set; explore aspirational / high added value set
  99. 99. stories customer, problem, solution who, why, what stories are not tasks card, conversation, confirmation “done, done”
  100. 100. breaking down stories business size (goal) -> user size (need) -> development size (1-3 days) faster, smaller, less riskier, more affordable products show progress, capture feedback, accelerate learning don’t break huge things into tasks - build smaller things with smaller tasks
  101. 101. breaking down stories what can you defer (functionality, scalability, users, performance, automation, validation, look’n feel...)? Look for “and”, “or”, “then”... breaker tool: conversations!!!!
  102. 102. exercise: elephant carpaccio - 3 Inputs: How many items, price per item, 2-letter state code - Output total price - Discounts: - $1K : 3% $5K : 5% $7K : 7% $10k : 10% $50k : 15% - State tax (over discounted price): - UT : 6.85% NV : 8% TX : 6.25% Al : 4% CA : 8.25% - We want 10-20 User Stories (Slices) - Each Slice: UI, input, output, visibly different from previous slice - 5 states comes before any discounts - Validation and fancy GUI after 5 states, 5 discounts
  103. 103. slicing heuristics workflow steps user roles user tasks / activities screens screen elements happy / unhappy path functionality zero, one, many test cases / use cases acceptance criteria business rules complexity, risk data types / interfaces single / multi user transient / persistent external dependencies manual / automate api / UI / gui alternate paths components platforms UX requirements
  104. 104. surface: low-fi prototypes
  105. 105. as seen in...
  106. 106. Backlog management
  107. 107. prioritization backlog is a funnel, not a tunnel there’s always more to do than capactity focus means saying “no” -> if you can’t say no, your “yes” means nothing you need regular backlog grooming and trimming
  108. 108. prioritization prioritize outcome and goals, not stories or features you won’t make everyone happy have a publicly known selection and prioritization framework
  109. 109. prioritization frameworks - “hippo” (highest paid person’s oppinion ;) - Kano model (must have, one dimensionals, delighters) - differenciator, spoiler, cost reduction, table stakes - satisfaction vs. importance - risk vs. opportunity - cost vs. benefit - cost of delay - “buy me a feature” - user poll - urgent vs. important - goal scoring / theme screening
  110. 110. release planning
  111. 111. estimation
  112. 112. Estimation The nature of estimates uncertainty cone
  113. 113. Estimation “two additional stories for every story”(Alistair cockburn) uncertainty grows exponentially with size estimation vs. forecasting uncertainty buffers / joe’s bucket / scrumban build less!
  114. 114. product metrics Course structure Kaizen culture Customer-focused product definition Product Development via build-measure- learn Kaizen enablers agile kaizen intro Metrics & goals actionable metrics funnel metrics product management & product development traditional vs. agile pm process defining opportunities: customer, problem, solution validating your assumptions: MVE, MVP, MMFS communicating your vision: product strategy & scope defining your product: structure & stories managing your backlogusing model canvas to gather your assumptions Kaizen events
  115. 115. metrics and goals - qualitative & quantitative metrics - Building metrics into goals
  116. 116. example: quicken (c) Dan olsen
  117. 117. example: quicken http://www.slideshare.net/dan_o/early-stage-web-product-management-by-dan-olsen (c) Dan olsen
  118. 118. example: quicken http://www.slideshare.net/dan_o/early-stage-web-product-management-by-dan-olsen (c) Dan olsen
  119. 119. building metrics into goals - we believe that (customer segment) type of users have (problem description) type of problem, which can be solved by (solution). We will know we are right when (quantitative metric outcome) and (qualitative metric outcome), which will lead to (KPI)
  120. 120. building metrics into goals - we believe that (new users) type of users have (completing the registration process) type of problem, which can be solved by (an improved ux on the registration process). We will know we are right when (percentage of drop offs diminishes) and (user satisfaction increases), which will lead to (increased conversion rate)
  121. 121. actionable metrics vs. vanity metrics - metrics should hurt - a change in a metric should move us to do something - everything we do should be an attempt to influence a metric
  122. 122. example: quicken
  123. 123. funnel - Acquisition - activation - recurrence - referral - revenue
  124. 124. Conversion rate - Acquisition - activation - recurrence - referral - revenue
  125. 125. funnel metrics (web) - Acquisition: CAC, campaign efficiency, channel effectiveness, unique visitors….. - activation: time spent, bounce rate, registration completion - recurrence: repeat visitors, LTV, churn, cohort analysis - referral: net promoter score, viral coefficient, customer satisfaction - revenue: ARPU, MRR
  126. 126. kpi’s - Acquisition: CAC, campaign efficiency, channel effectiveness, unique visitors….. - activation: time spent, bounce rate, registration completion - recurrence: repeat visitors, LTV, churn, cohort analysis - referral: net promoter score, viral coefficient, customer satisfaction - revenue: ARPU, MRR
  127. 127. Other metrics - usability - performance - Community - competitors - …...
  128. 128. Exercise: restaurant actionable metrics - Acquisition: ??….. - activation: ??.. - recurrence: ??.. - referral: ??.. - revenue: ??.. - Other metrics: ??..
  129. 129. some math... - churn = 1 / life time (months) - ltv = arpu / churn - sample goals: ltv > 3 * CAC, CAC payback < 12 months…, conversion rate > 2%
  130. 130. retention is key! - high cost of acquiring customers = many customer unprofitable during their early life - increasing customer retention rates by 5% increases profits by 25% to 95% across a wide range of industries (fred reichheld, “the loyalty effect”) - 1% to 2% retention = 2*LTV, 1/2 CAC
  131. 131. be careful! - Not everything that counts can be counted - be careful with moral hazard - be careful with analysis paralysis - correlation is not causation - don’t cargo cult metrics
  132. 132. More at http://Slideshare.net/proyectalis Thank you and... BLOG IT!! (Oh, yes, and buy the books!) http://www.proyectalis.com/en/AngelMedinilla

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