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Sous vide

  1. 1. Sous Vide
  2. 2.  I will be creating, designing and presenting a sous vide food product that fits the required brief.  I will be testing and evaluating the product until the dish is completed to a high standard. I will then cook the finished dish for it to then be judged and assessed.  The finished product will then have the nutritional information calculated and a package designed that is appealing to customers. Introduction
  3. 3. Timeline of Sous Vide 1799. Sir Benjamin Thompson discovered Sous Vide 1960. The development of stable, high temperature, food safe plastic films were developed and made sous vide cooking possible.(1) American and French engineers started using Sous Vide 1967. George Pralus used Sous Vide to reduce shrinkage of Fois Gras. Bruno Goussault researched different temperatures for Sous Vide 21st Century. Used around the world in production companies and restaurants.
  4. 4. What is Sous Vide?
  5. 5. The term Sous Vide is French for “under vacuum”. It is a professional cooking method that uses a specially sealed and pressurised plastic bag (which holds the food) that diminishes the contact with aerobic bacteria. The bag is then placed into a water bath at an accurately determined temperature which is kept constant by an immersion circulator. It is then cooked in the water bath for a scheduled amount of time till the correct ‘doneness’ is reached. The finished result is a product that is evenly cooked, isn’t dried out, has an amazing texture and flavour and enhanced health benefits. What is Sous Vide?
  6. 6. The History of Sous Vide Cooking
  7. 7. The Beginning…..
  8. 8. Early Years:  Sous vide is one of the oldest forms of cooking and started as a form of cooking food at low temperatures in sealed vessels.  Found in China, Hawaii and Mexico the Early Civilisations used clay pots to simmer tough meats, cooked whole pigs underground and cornhusks were tossed into glowing embers. France used the cooking ‘en papillote’ where food was cooked in an envelope parchment which is still around today. 1799:  Sir Benjamin Thompson first described the method as an industrial food preservation method(1). The Beginning…..
  9. 9. The Early Years
  10. 10. 1960’s:  American and French engineers discovered Sous Vide for food preservation.  Stable, high temperature and food safe plastic bags/films were developed which made Sous Vide possible. 1967:  George Pralus was trying to reduce shrinkage of his Fois Gras terrine. He found that buy sealing it in a plastic vacuum sealed bag and immersing it in water for a precise time and temperature, the shrinkage went from 40% down to 5%. He found that it cooked perfectly without losing fat and created a nicertexture whilst reducing on product loss.  He served this in his French restaurant “Troisgros”. Pralus has now taught many chefs around the world the art of Sous Vide.  Bruno Goussault: Another Sous Vide pioneer, he researched different cooking temperatures for different foods. He then trained chefs in this art and has helped food manufacturers develop food for sale. 20th Century
  11. 11. 20th Century 1960
  12. 12.  George Pralus:  Bruno Goussault: Foie Gras
  13. 13.  Food production companies have now embraced the art of Sous Vide cookery. With a new implemented HACCP plan, foods have been found to have a longer shelf life with a great transportation ability.  Sous Vide has also changed from the Haute Cuisine stage to more Casual Dining. Fast food and casual dining restaurants have started to use the Sous Vide technique in a “hope to ensure quality control and taste across their respective locations”(2).  It’s a cooking technique that has changed a lot through the years and with new safety procedures and more knowledge on Sous Vide, food sellers and suppliers are starting to realise the benefits. In the not so near future I'm certain that many of the food products available at the supermarket shelves will be Sous Vide due to the ease of use and effectiveness. Sous Vide Today
  14. 14. There are so many Sous Vide products available now…..
  15. 15. Sous Vide Today THOMASKELLER TETSUYAWAKUDA HESTONBLUMENTHAL
  16. 16. Sous Vide  For sous vide to work a Vacuum packer and Thermal emersion circulator is needed.
  17. 17. Vacuum Packing Machines Thermal Emersion – Sous Vide machines From Sous Chef.co.nz PolyScience 18L bath. $161.00 From Sous Chef.co,nz PolyScience Sous Vide Creative Series. $572.87 From Sous Chef.co.nz PolyScience Sous Vide Professional. $1,274.99 From Contour Sales.co.nz Domestic Vacuum Packing. $150.00 From Contour Sales.co.nz Benchtop Vacuum Packing. $389.99
  18. 18. Vacuum Packing.  Vacuum packing has become a way that chefs in restaurants and commercial food companies are using to pack their food goods.  Vacuum packing foods can: Reduce food wastage Prevent freezer burn Make food storage safer Help with portion control Lower the cost of foods Advance food preparation Save time > Food can be safely stored and increase the shelf life of some foods which saves money and time. These are valuable resources when in the food industry that is important to be aware of. It is hygienic and takes to time at all.
  19. 19. Food shelf life's extended due to vacuum packing
  20. 20. Stovetop or your faithful chilly bin!  Stove: The cheapest way to Sous Vide is on your stove. Using a thermometer and hot and cold water to help regulate the temperature you can achieve the sous vide results.  Chilly Bin: Another easy way to replicate Sous Vide. By using a thermometer to check the temperature and hot and cold water you can cook foods sous vide. The chilly bin helps to hold the heat and make it and effective and cheap use.
  21. 21. Advantages and Disadvantages of using the stove top or Chilly Bin  Advantages: Cheap, doesn’t require special equipment.  Disadvantages: Time consuming as you have to keep checking the temperature, Imprecise as the water temp will always be fluctuating and this can change your texture and ‘doneness’ of your foods.
  22. 22. Sous Vide Vegetables  Usually it takes time to cook vegetables till the inside of the vegetable is ready to eat. Sometimes vegetables can become over-cooked and mushy. Sous Vide cooks vegetables to a uniform ‘doneness’ and helps to hold your vegetables together.
  23. 23. Cooking Fish Sous Vide  Fish usually has a short window of ‘doneness’. It can quickly go from undercooked to overcooked in a few minutes. Using Sous Vide you can eliminate this by setting the temperature and time so that the flavours develop, the fish is perfectly cooked and a unique texture develops. (58-62oC)
  24. 24. Cooking Meat Sous Vide  Half the meats we cook are usually tough; shank, shoulder, tongue and hearts. We usually cook these by braising or roasting but this can cause the meat to dry out. But when cooking meat Sous Vide you can avoid the meat from drying out by setting the correct temperature and time you can cook your meats to tender, medium rare cuts. This can not occur with traditional cooking methods. (60oC)
  25. 25. Future Trends Chef’s have come a long way from the reliable fire and pot to the sous vide machine and even using fish tank bubble machines to aerate sauces. Even though sous vide has taken over many companies and restaurants sous vide will stay and help with cooking some foods such as eggs and some meats but in the end the reliable heating of a pan on a stovetop will prevail. People like things that work and if it works why change it? This is what Sous Vide will have to contend with as the years go on. We may even see the rice cooker, crock pot and sous vide machine merge to create an easy leave, heat and eat type of foods that save time. I still think that Sous vide is a great cooking method and there are certainly many chefs and other well-known people that stand by it. Seeing if Sous Vide is a trend or will morph into something technical will be seen in time.
  26. 26. Stakeholders  Will Mulders: He taught us some techniques of sous vide and how to cook sous vide products from fish and chicken.  Watties: As they used ‘Risotto’ as an example for product development. As they develop food products some findings that we could find during our investigation could help them in further products.  Tutors: Because they are constantly learning from their students :D  Students: If anyone is interested in Sous Vide or want to learn more about the technique then our research can help them understand and give them advantages and disadvantages.
  27. 27. Negatives of Sous Vide
  28. 28. Positives of Sous Vide
  29. 29. My Sous Vide Dish
  30. 30. Evaluation 1  Sous Vide Curry and Rice
  31. 31. Evaluation 2  Sous Vide stuffed chicken served with savory potatoes, cranberry chutney and orange infused carrots
  32. 32. Evaluation 3  Sous Vide stuffed chicken served with savory potatoes, honey glazed cranberrys, orange infused carrots, brown jus and a nut and bacon crumb with micro-greens
  33. 33. Evaluation 4  Sous Vide stuffed chicken served with rice pilaff embellished with a bacon nut crumb, orange infused carrots, honey glazed cranberrys and brown jus

Notas del editor

  • Sous Vide. French for ‘under vacuum’.
    The art to which vacuumed foods are cooked in water to achieve immaculate texture and taste.

  • This diagram outlines the process.

    Food is placed in specially designed plastic bags

    It is then vacuum packed to help stop aerobic bacterial growth.

    The bag is then placed into a water bath with a determined temperature and then cooked till the product is tender, evenly cooked and ready to eat.



  • But how did sous vide come about?
  • The idea of wrapping food and slow cooking at low temperatures is one of the oldest forms of cooking.
    The technique was used by early Civilisations in China, Hawaii and Mexico.
  • They used clay pots to simmer tough meats,

    cooked whole pigs underground and

    cornhusks were tossed into glowing embers.


    France used the cooking ‘en papillote’ where food was
    cooked in an envelope parchment which is still seen in many
    local restaurants as well as used here at EIT.



  • In 1960 American and French engineers discovered Sous Vide for food preservation.

    Around this time stable, high temperature and food safe plastic bags/films were developed which made Sous Vide possible.

    Around the time of 1967 George Pralus was trying to reduce shrinkage of his Fois Gras terrine.


  • George Pralus:
    He found that buy sealing it in a plastic vacuum sealed bag and immersing it in water for a precise time and temperature, the shrinkage went from 40% down to 5%.
    It was cooked perfectly, didn’t lose fat and created a nicer texture whilst reducing on product loss.

    Bruno Goussault:
    He researched different cooking temperatures for different foods. He then trained
    chefs in this art and has helped food manufacturers develop food for sale.
  • Sous vide is now found everywhere in the world:

    Silver fern farms
    Tetsuya Wakuda
    Heston Blumenthal
    Scholars Restaurant
    Elephant Hill
    Black barn
    Kaweka
    Thomas Keller
  • Food production companies have now embraced the art of Sous Vide cookery. With a new implemented HACCP plan, foods have been found to have a longer shelf life with a great transportation ability.

    Chefs such as Thomas Keller, Heston Blumenthal and Tetsuya Wakuda are also using the sous vide method in their high end restaurants.
    It is used to “intensify flavours of fruits or vegetables or to tenderise tough cuts of meat”.
  • http://www.google.co.nz/imgres?q=chart+of+foods+in+vacuum+packing&um=1&hl=en&client=safari&rls=en&biw=1920&bih=889&tbm=isch&tbnid=LP0Txb2ZIKqjCM:&imgrefurl=http://aryvacmaster.com/cgi/ary.wsc/storagebags.html%3Fp-item-num%3DVacStrip&imgurl=http://aryvacmaster.com/vacmaster/HANT_2009/images/food-storage-chart.jpg&w=675&h=448&ei=-RI_UNjWDYaTiAfQuoCIDw&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=351&vpy=603&dur=349&hovh=114&hovw=172&tx=127&ty=166&sig=117486345280029841639&page=1&tbnh=114&tbnw=172&start=0&ndsp=52&ved=1t:429,r:43,s:0,i:205
  • The option for casual food restaurants or fast-food places to use sous vide are also becoming available.

    It means that “workers with little training can produce expert and completely uniform results. Exactly what a large chain needs”.

    Home cooks are also able to get in on the trend with sous vide machines coming out this year for as much as $300.
  • The negatives of Sous Vide cooking are:

    Cost, it can be pricy if you want top of the line machines and equipment

    Sizing, all foods in the sous vide bag must be the same size to ensure even cooking

    Complete meals, you cant place meat and vegetables in the same packet as cooking temperatures are different.

    Adverse reacton, people havent been so supportive of cooking foods in ‘plastic’ so can put customers off.
  • The positives of sous vide cooking are:

    Time, foods have a longer shelf life, save on labour and food can be left unattended when cooking.

    Tender and reduced weight loss, Meat is tender and juicy without drying out and retains the foods flavours.

    Nutritional, sous vide cooking means that the vitamins and minerals are not all destroyed during the cooking process.

    And sous vide food means that because the food is vacuum packed there is no risk of cross contamination between products,
    Such as storing in fridges.
  • Sous Vide cooking has come a long way since the early years.

    Wether this technique takes off and becomes an everyday cooking element is something that is unsure,
    as we have used the simple pot, pan and fire for over a 100 years.

    Sous vide may also take over the household slow cooker as another form of easy cooking.
    Where you can place food on in the morning and it’s ready for when you come home for dinner.

    I think that Sous Vide has developed in a way that means it is now becoming more assessable to people,
    so we may even be able to see this technique expand to everyday cooking in the future.

  • My first sous vide practical expectation was that I wanted my dish to be a type of curry and rice that you could find on the supermarket shelves.

    After cooking my dish I wanted to change it so that I could have a meat, vegetable and sauce product to firstly appeal to customers, secondly show a higher skill level and lastly

    SOUS VIDE
    Cooking times:
    Chicken: Cut into strips and vacuumed. In at 58oC at 9.38am and checked at 10.15am. Temp was 79oC.
    Was nicely cooked and tasted yum!
    Curry: Cooked off ingredients and placed in sous vide bag at 58oc FOR 1HR. Checked food after this and was soft and ready to eat.
    Rice:
    4 bags:
    1- 1 cup of rice with 240g liquid for 40min (as per recipe). In: 9.21am, out: 10.01am
    Rice was uncooked, gritty and mushy. Had a lot of liquid left over and tasted gross.
    2- 58g rice with 117g liquid for 40min. In: 9.41am, out 10.17am
    Again it was uncooked and flavourless. Still too much liquid and it was not very nice to eat.
    3- 58g of rice with 116g liquid for 40min. In: 9.41am, out: 10.17am
    Uncooked, mushy, no flavour and disgusting. Still a little too much liquid but absorption a lot better compared to other rice packs.
    4- 58g rice with 80g liquid for 40min. In: 9.41am, out: 10.17am.
    Rice was a little undercooked, not enough liquid in the bag. Still tastes disgusting but that could be changed by adding different ingredients.
    What I thought before cooking and my expectations:
    - I want my dish to be a sous vide dish that you could find in the supermarket. With the rice and curry on the shelf. I want to open the packet and pull out the rice and then place the curry over top after microwaving the sous vide bags so it is a ready to eat meal.
    Conclusions after cooking:
    - My chicken turned out really nicely. It tasted good and I was very happy with the result and cooking time.
    - The curry was also good, I wasn’t fond of the taste but the other students and tutor enjoyed it so it must’ve been good! It cooked well in the sous vide bag but incorporated the ingredients in pan before sous vide to just get some extra flavour and colour.
    - The rice was obviously unsuccessful. All bags were undercooked and tasted disgusting. I could change the flavours and ingredients to change this but I have chosen to change my product.
    I was interested in a full sous vide product but want to now do a sous vide chicken product and to not do the risotto. This is because the time restrictions for me have meant that I have to produce a dish in 3 practises with the fourth being the final assessed one. I would love to play around with temperatures and times for sous vide risotto but I don’t have enough time and so I will be choosing another starch.
    It was very interesting in looking at the absorption method of risotto as it is something that is different from cooking plan rice.


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