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ASSESSMENT OF INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS

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A Recreational Dissertation based on assessment of interactive spaces in college campus..

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ASSESSMENT OF INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS

  1. 1. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 1 ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 1. INTRODUCTION Student’s interactive spaces in institutions are very important in now a days to gather and interact. This reality is pushing higher leaders to enhance that connectivity to build a more interactive environment. Student cannot be complete without the interaction to each other because some students have some different knowledge, idea, view, perception on particular topic/subjects. Social interactions such as debate, discussion and group working have an influential role on students’ interaction experiences. Group conversations can turn into a beneficial interaction in which students share knowledge or gain new information. 1.1. AIM: This dissertation aims to analyze the existing situation of students’ interactive spaces in college campus and propose ways to upgrade them. 1.2. OBJECTIVES 1. To understand what will be the positive impact of interactive spaces in college premises. 2. To understand how interactive spaces helps to develop the overall personality of students. 3. To understand the factors which attracts these interactions. 4. To find how these spaces can be re-designed to provide much better interactive spaces in college campus.
  2. 2. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 2 1.3. SCOPE & LIMITATIONS Scope of dissertation involves understanding various outdoor and indoor interactive spots in an institution. 1.4. CASE STUDIES: I. Amity University, Noida. II. Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi. III. Delhi Technological University, Delhi. 1.5. METHODOLOGY: CONCLUSION & RECOMMENDATION INFERENCES DRAWN CLASSIFICATION, ANALYSIS and INTERPRETATION OF DATA CASE STUDIES LITERATURE STUDIES INTERVIEWS SELF OBSERVATION
  3. 3. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 3 CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE STUDIES RESEARCH DOCUMENT 2.1 Informal spaces Author: Gaurav raheja and Smita suryavanshi Source: Inclusive Informal Campus Spaces through Universal Design India Principles. May 2012, pg. 2-3 ABSTRACT Informal or semi-formal spaces on campuses can be discussed as vast subjects and domains of inclusive campus planning that lie unattended or get very little attention from access perspectives in our educational environments. Moreover such spaces provide an active academic environment and a vibrant campus social life. These are also spaces that remain potential nuclei for congregations, discussions and recreational activities making a campus a social microcosm in an urban context. Informal campus spaces as an approach in India. Universal design as a theory facilitates and empowers the processes of creating access beyond the common notion of barrier free environments and intending to create spaces that could be used by all with convenience including persons with disabilities (PwDs). 2.2 Physical space and social interaction1 Editor: Muhammad Hilmy Bin Muslim Source: The use of informal learning space by students May 2011, pg. 57-63 1 the use of informal learning space by students in uitm shah alam campus Author: MUHAMMAD HILMY BIN MUSLIM
  4. 4. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 4 The physical environment can influence the social and task interactions among the people in it. Primarily this influence involves relative accessibility of interaction and the psychological and social interpretation of such interactions. For example, physical distance represents a major determinant of social influence. social interaction and the layout of space reciprocally influence each other. It is thus important to consider the nature and function of work processes within and between groups or teams when designing work areas to support them. Not only should the initiation and implementation of collaborative work be considered, but also its maintenance and coordination over time. open spaces, particularly open spaces incorporating symbolic focus points or other directing elements, can facilitate and coordinate the communication so necessary for efficient collaboration. Group areas may even need more attention paid to social “channeling” and other symbolic details than personal work areas, since 60 percent of what people learn occurs informally, and much of this happens within teams. JOURNALS 2.3 Interactive spaces Editor: Diana G.Oblinger Source: www.educause.edu/learningspaces 2006, pg. 2.2-2.9 ABSTRACT Interaction takes place everywhere in college campus in fact interaction takes place everywhere. Human beings have the capacity to interact through their reflections and experiences. 2Space can have powerful impact on interaction, we cannot overlook space in our attempts to 2 www.educause.edu/learningspaces
  5. 5. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 5 accomplish our goals. The influence of physical space on human activity has been studied from both psychological and physical perspectives which includes psychological comfort with space and the motivational and inspirational effects of space. Moving beyond classrooms to interactive space, the typical unadorned corridors where students pass from class to class and sit on the benches or sit on floor outside classroom spaces. Our current interactive spaces present several opportunities, as well as sustainable barriers. Technology, which allows access to information and interactive environments, also enables different uses of physical space. Facilities planners, maintenance operations, faculty and students , all must realize that good space is not a luxury but a key determinant of good interaction environments.
  6. 6. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 6 CHAPTER - 3 COLLEGE INTEREACTIVE SPACES AND RECREATION 3.1 INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS Several interactive spaces are used by students within the college campus which serve as a gathering place for students to interact as well as share ideas by group discussions which in turn gives an impact on the overall psychology of an individual and gives him/her opportunity to cater knowledge as well as boost him internally for further exposures these places includes -3 3.1.1 HOME BASE: PLACES ADJACENT TO SPECIFIC BUILDINGS Research indicates that 92% of students believe they have a “home base.” This is true of graduate students, employees, and faculty, as well as undergraduate students. The home base usually revolves around a student’s major department, where the student has most classes, sees an advisor, and participates in departmental events. Four subcategories were developed to describe various home base gathering places across campus. They are: The Front Porch, The Front Yard, The Back Yard, and The Back Door. 3.1.2 THE FRONT PORCH In the home base terminology, a building’s main entrance is analogous to a front porch. Just as the front porch of a house offers an important physical and psychological transition from the public life of the community to the more private life of the smaller social group, the main entrance of a campus building can offer a similar transition from the campus as a whole 3 Reinforcing Community Campus Gathering Places AUTHOR :Dunbar/Jones PLC PAGE-7-9
  7. 7. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 7 to the college or department. This area can be an important social, study, meeting, and eating place. Main entrances to buildings have the greatest concentration of outdoor campus use and, if they are to best meet student needs, should include places to study and eat comfortably outdoors, as well as opportunities to meet casually with faculty outside class and office hours. 3.1.3 THE FRONT YARD While the front path and front porch of a typical house are hard surfaced, the front yard of a home typically provides a soft, green transition or buffer between private and public space, the same is true for campus buildings. Some campus buildings have front yards, significant green spaces where building residents can relax differently than on the front porch. Here one can go with a friend to talk privately, to sunbathe or nap, to eat, to study, or to hold a class meeting close to home base. Clearly a change of environment is important to a person’s mental health and stress level. Being in a campus building often carries with it certain expectations: study, work, lecture, file, answer the phone, or attend a meeting; while being outdoors usually does not carry the same expectations and therefore can be a calming antidote to the stresses of work and study as well as the physiological stresses of institutional buildings. For these reasons, the concept of front yard is important. For some people the idea of sunbathing or relaxing in public may be inhibiting; but resting, meditating, or daydreaming in a familiar place that is a part of one’s home base, around people one knows, may be more acceptable. 3.1.4 THE BACK YARD Just as every home has a front yard that is generally open to the view of passersby and is therefore semi-public, most homes also have a back yard that is fully or partially enclosed and used for both private and utilitarian functions. Campus buildings, too, should have back yards, that is, spaces
  8. 8. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 8 attached to or partially enclosed by buildings, where “residents” feel a greater sense of territory than in the front yard and where semi-private departmental or college events can be held. A partially enclosed space where people can have lunch or meet in small, informal groups is important to the sense of community of a particular building. Such a back yard space can provide a more intimate alternative to the more lively, more public front porch, yet may be overlooked in the harried pace of the university. Not all departments have the same need for a back yard space. Departments such as art, drama, and literature have a greater opportunity to use some type of back yard for informal class activities. For other departments such as engineering, biology, and geology, the necessity of using laboratories or equipment reduces the ability to use outdoor space. 3.1.5 THE BACK DOOR Most houses have a very different image at the back door when compared to the front door. Similarly, a campus building should have an unmistakable back door or service entrance where trucks park to unload, noxious materials are stored, and waste is picked up. Difficulties occur when the front door and back door are one and the same. It can be irritating or impossible for people to socialize, eat lunch, or study while service vehicles move about in close proximity. The designated back door of a building should be an unmistakable service entry, conveniently located for delivery access without violating the front porch or front yard spaces of the same or adjacent building, and located so the noise of vehicles. 3.1.6 CAMPUS SPACES USED BY EVERYONE If spaces close to campus buildings can be thought of as adjuncts to a house, then common areas between these buildings might be viewed as the streets and parks of the campus community, those public spaces that
  9. 9. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 9 are not the territory of specific buildings or departments. Seven categories describe Common Turf campus spaces used by everyone: Major Plazas, Favorite Outdoor Spaces/Green Spaces, Outdoor Study Areas/Informal, Outdoor Classrooms, Overlooks, Major Bus Stops, and Campus Entrances. 3.1.6.1. MAJOR PLAZAS Just as every traditional village or small town has a common green or town square, so each campus community seems to require a place where friends meet, bands play, displays are placed, rallies are staged, and people come to watch other people or just relax between classes. The nature of these places varies greatly across the country and throughout, from the green area of grass and trees to the hard-surfaced space at. Plazas offer an opportunity to integrate college culture with the campus spatial structure, as well as providing a public place for memorials or recognition. A large green space must not seem empty when not in use, but a hard surfaced space does. The subtle use of planting, paving, seating and other landscape elements is essential to create a space appropriate for large gatherings that does not appear empty at other times. 3.1.6.2. FAVORITE OUTDOOR SPACES/GREENSPACES Research has shown that most students enjoy having easy access to both urban space and green space, but the majority identified open space and green space as a preference over malls and plazas. The identified favorite places tended to be green or “natural” environments and/or were not seen as the territory or home base of any particular building or department. These spaces are used much as a downtown worker might use a park or other green space: as a place to retreat to, to get away from the pressures of work, to find respite and relax. What seems to be common to all favorite spaces is that natural elements like trees, shrubs, grass, creeks, and water
  10. 10. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 10 bodies form the boundaries of these spaces, mostly or totally blocking out the presence of nearby buildings or streets. The broad range of activities occurring in these natural spaces are seating, watching, sunbathing, napping, and others seems to be essential to alleviating stress in students, faculty, staff, and visitors. Just as the city as a whole needs green spaces to act as its lungs, so do urban campuses. 3.1.6.3. OUTDOOR STUDY AREA/INFORMAL Common turf areas and those related to buildings can offer valuable locations for casual outdoor study between classes or for discussions that would be distracting in the library or classroom. Factors that inhibit outdoor study are too many people, nowhere to sit, glare from the sun and buildings on papers and books, noise from vehicles, outdoor distractions, passersby, and no place to write or lean on. If located, detailed, and furnished appropriately, places for outdoor study and reading will see increased use in appropriate seasons. Location Considerations 1. Near major building entrances, where students can study between classes or at lunch time while remaining close to their home base or in familiar territory, but separated from major pedestrian flow. 2. Areas close to inexpensive food or snacks. 3. Open lawn areas for those who prefer to study close to their home base or in a more public place with significant space around them. 4. Secluded small places for those who wish to undertake more contemplative or private work. These places could be related to a natural resource site such as the Iowa River or Arboretum. 5. Places away from the noise and distraction of vehicular traffic or parking areas. 6. Semi-enclosed patios or terraces near libraries or classrooms that offer an alternative to indoor reading.
  11. 11. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 11 7. Out-of-the-way places along major pedestrian traffic flows.4 8. Spots under large, mature trees that themselves create a subspace. A bench configuration where a number of people who do not want to talk to one another can sit and study is appropriate. 9. Sites against the blank walls of buildings where the space is not perceived to be the territory of that building or department. 3.1.6.4. OUTDOOR CLASSROOMS Outdoor classrooms are those areas that provide the location, design and amenities to accommodate classes in a more formal setting. These spaces can be related to a major classroom building or a cluster of smaller classroom buildings within easy walking distance. Location Considerations 1. Near major classroom buildings or within easy walking distance of several smaller classroom buildings. 2. Places away from the noise and distraction of vehicular traffic or parking areas. 3. Out-of-the-way spaces next to the site of major pedestrian traffic flows within walking distance of major classroom buildings or a cluster of smaller classroom buildings. 4. Spots under large, mature trees that themselves create a subspace. 3.1.6.5. OVERLOOKS High places on campus that provide views overlooking the natural and built environment of the campus are uncommon and are sometimes ignored as being special campus spaces. Overlooks should provide the basic elements that allow, encourage, and enhance the experience for those who want to enjoy the views, while not diminishing the experience for those who 4 Reinforcing Community Campus Gathering Places AUTHOR :Dunbar/Jones PLC PAGE-15-20
  12. 12. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 12 prefer to use overlook sites as more conventional outdoor gathering spaces. 3.1.6.6. MAJOR BUS STOPS Bus stops on campus are common places to those who use the transit system. Improving bus stops as a place for waiting may increase ridership. Making the major bus stop/transfer point environment a temporary mini- oasis with a comfortable place to sit, sheltered from the elements, allows users to talk to others, study, or simply relax while waiting for the bus to arrive. 3.1.6.7. CAMPUS ENTRANCES Students, faculty, staff, and visitors arrive on campus in cars, public transit, and on foot or bicycle. Each campus entrance has its own character, reflecting it primary mode of entry, whether pedestrian, auto, or bus. Pedestrian campus entries should be located where large numbers of people enter on foot, and should provide pleasant subspaces for waiting, eating, casual study, perusing notices, and picking up newspapers or flyers. Major and minor entrances are important locations for legible, well-lit campus maps. A separate study should be conducted to identify and develop campus entrances and incorporate gathering place design elements where appropriate. On the other hand sports spaces plays a vital role in forming recreational spaces and are taken as major spaces for the students to interact and get motivational inspiration through games as well as these spaces also gives the participants and spectators the message of working in team spirit. Sports also helps in the personality development of a student and revives the health aspects of an individual. Sports Spots may include the following spaces mentioned-
  13. 13. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 13 3.1.6.8. List of Outdoor Co-curricular Activities 1. Mass parade 2. Mass drill 3. Yoga 4. Athletics 5. Bicycling 6. Gardening 7. Cricket 8. Football 9. Basketball 10. Volleyball 11. Kabaddi 12. Kho kho 13. Hand ball 14. Gymnasium with well equipped facilities. 15. Swimming pool. 16. Trekking. 3.1.6.9. List of Indoor Co-curricular Activities 1. Dramatics 2. Music and dance 3. Drawing and painting 4. Decoration 5. Weaving 6. Snooker 7. Carom 8. Squash 9. Chess 10. Badminton 11. Lawn Tennis 12. Tailoring 13. Student self government 14. Art and craft
  14. 14. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 14 3.2 INTER RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INTERACTIVE SPACES AND RECREATION The relationship of interactive spaces towards recreation is directly proportional, more the recreation space is well designed according to the use and surroundings the more recreation is going to take place. An individual visits an interactive space like parks for relaxation and more comfortable environment he finds the more recreation takes place for him. Interactive spaces can be of various forms and may serve different objectives they can either be used by involving a user within them or a user can just watch and enjoy these spaces, these spaces directly or indirectly serve a recreational spot for the visitors or users. An interactive space serves as a recreational spot but a recreational space cannot b always a interactive space, which means that an interactive space can b definitely a source for recreation because its already molded for the recreational use but a recreational space such as a flat ground can be used as a place for recreation like playing but it doesn't sound as an interactive space. 3.3 TO UNDERSTAND HOW INTERACTIVE SPACES HELP TO DEVELOP THE OVERALL PERSONALITY OF STUDENT. The physical environment of a college campus provides the context for learning and social interactions. These interactions lead to involved students which help build community, and vibrant communities on college campuses contribute to student persistence and academic success. The student develop meaningful connection with their peers through interactions in outdoor spaces, student organization offices, academic facilities and recreational areas. The physical spaces encourages interaction and help to facilitate campus involvement. Natural and built environments of a college campus influence how students discover, built,
  15. 15. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 15 and sustained community. well-designed learning spaces have a motivational effect for learner. Learning areas provide an environment that is simple and enjoyable to work or study in will support engagement in learning, and persuade a desire to continue activities beyond timetabled classes. Involving learners in aspects of the design is important. This indicates that learners can have assessed of control over the learning environment and over their own learning. 3.3.1 Co-curricular activities Co-curricular activities facilitate in the development of various domains of mind and personality such as intellectual development, emotional development, social development, moral development and aesthetic development. Creativity, Enthusiasm, and Energetic, Positive thinking are some of the facets of personality development and the outcomes of Extracurricular activities. Co-curricular activities (CCAs) earlier known as Extracurricular Activities (ECA) are the components of non-academic curriculum helps to develop various facets of the personality development of the child and students. For all-round development of the student, there is a need of emotional, physical, spiritual and moral development that is complemented and supplemented by Co-curricular Activities. These are the very important part and parcel of educational institutions to develop the students’ personality as well as to strengthen the classroom learning. 3.3.2 Importance and benefits of co-curricular activities 1. Co-curricular activities stimulate playing, acting, singing, recitation, speaking and narrating in students. 2. Activities like participation in game debates, music, drama, etc., help in achieving overall functioning of education. 3. It enables the students to express themselves freely through debates. 4. Games and Sports helps to be fit and energetic to the student.
  16. 16. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 16 5. Helps to develop the spirit of healthy competition. 6. These activities guide students how to organize and present an activity, how to develop skills, how to co-operate and co-ordinate in different situations-all these helps in leadership qualities. 7. It provides the avenues of socialization, self-identification and self- assessment when the child come in contact with organizers, fellow participants, teachers, people outside the school during cultural activity. 8. Inculcate the values to respects other’s view and feeling. 9. It makes you perfect in decision making. 10. It develop a sense of belongingness. 11. CCA provide motivation for learning. 12. CCA develop the values like physical, psychological, Ethical, academic, civic, social, aesthetic, cultural recreational and disciplinary values 3.4 TYPES OF RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES GOING ON IN COLLEGE CAMPUS Students need different recreational activity areas according to the use and purpose either by participating or being spectator there are different activity zones according to the requirement. These areas directly or indirectly effect the individuals personality aspect as well as motivates him by giving him an impact of team work. The activities vary from either simple discussions or by any sport activity, group discussions may include areas like grounds a simple corridor or area in front of the classroom moreover sitting spaces like cafeteria and areas where eatables are available are considered as hot spots for the gatherings . Sports activities may vary from games which require less area to games which require larger area for a student to get involved in them. Small discussions can also be seen taking place in parking lots.
  17. 17. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 17 3.5 RECREATIONAL USE IN CAMPUS 3.5.1 FREQUENCY OF CAMPUS RECREATIONAL FACILITY USAGE In this section we will understand the percentage of students which uses the recreational center spaces, to understand clearly data has been taken universally from studies and is been depicted in the form of pie chart. CHART 1:-FREQUENCY OF CAMPUS RECREATIONAL SPACES In the above pie chart we see that the majority of student of 41% is such that has never visited the recreational center in the campus. more students stop using the Campus Recreation Center, as they progress through college. 5This could be due to busier schedules and the trend that more students move off campus as they progress through college. In a future section it will be shown that many more off-campus students fail to use the facilities than those living on-campus. 5 A Study of Campus Recreation Usage: Developing Our Student Body into Well-Balanced Graduates By Carson Hardy And Garrett Hellman 40% 26% 15% 14% 5% NEVER WENT A FEW TIMES A MONTH SEVERAL TIMES A MONTH MORE THAN 12 TIMES A MONTH DAILY
  18. 18. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 18 3.5.2 YEAR IN COLLEGE VS. USAGE Below the chart depicts the use of recreational spaces in college campus according to the different age group and academic level among students. CHART 2:-Year in College vs. Usage (Percentages) We can see that for each year in college the largest sector consists of students who never used the facility or went less than a few times and never went back. This will continue to be a trend with many of the variables when compared to usage. However, the trend here seems to be that except for the transition from freshman to sophomore, more students stop using the Campus Recreation Center, as they progress through college. This could be due to busier schedules and the trend that more students move off campus as they progress through college. 3.5.3 GENDER VS. USAGE With respect to Gymnasium usage among the two genders a universal survey tells us that the woman use gymnasium comparatively less than males this may b due to many females they did not have enough free time to use the gym, so this could be another contributing factor as to why so few females use the gym on a daily basis. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Year in college vs usage NEVER WENT OR WENT LESS THAN A FEW TIMES(1-6)AND NEVER WENT BACK A FEW TIMES A MONTH (1-6) SEVERAL TIMES A MONTHS (7-12) MORE THAN 12 TIMES A MONTH DAILY
  19. 19. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 19 44% 27% 14% 12% 3% Female NEVER WENT A FEW TIMES A MONTH SEVERAL TIMES A MONTH MORE THAN 12 TIMES A MONTH DAILY 48% 25% 14% 10% 3% Off-Campus Percentage NEVER WENT A FEW TIMES A MONTH SEVERAL TIMES A MONTH MORE THAN 12 TIMES A MONTH DAILY CHART 3:-Usage of the Campus Recreation Center by Gender 3.5.4 ON CAMPUS/OFF CAMPUS USAGE Students of both categories study in campus that is on campus and off campus and they are nearly around 50-50 in percentage and globalised studies show that on campus students uses the recreational spaces more then off campus students. In case of gym most of the off campus students join the gym near their locality or what suits them better according to facilities. the chart below will clear the percentage and use of the recreational spaces by on campus and off campus students. CHART 4:-Usage of the Campus Recreation Center by Gender(MALE) 35% 25% 15% 17% 8% Male NEVER WENT A FEW TIMES A MONTH SEVERAL TIMES A MONTH MORE THAN 12 TIMES A MONTH DAILY 28% 29% 16% 21% 7% On-Campus Percentage NEVER WENT A FEW TIMES A MONTH SEVERAL TIMES A MONTH MORE THAN 12 TIMES A MONTH DAILY
  20. 20. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 20 CHART 5:-Figure 6 On/Off-Campus vs. Usage by Percentage 28% 29% 16% 21% 7% 48% 25% 14% 10% 3% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% NEVER WENT OR WENT LESS A FEW TIMES A MONTH SEVERAL TIMES A MONTH MORE THAN 12 TIMES A MONTH DAILY Year in college vs usage PERCENTAGE (ON) PERCENTAGE (OFF)
  21. 21. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 21 CHAPTER - 4 CASE STUDIES 4.1 AMITY UNIVERSITY (NOIDA SECTOR- 125) 4.1.1 BACKGROUND Amity University was formed by Ashok Chauhan, the founder of the Ritnand Balved Education Foundation. Amity was India's first private university slated to implement reservations based on caste etc. for both faculty as well as students. The school started was started in 2003 with an enrollment of 120 students. In 2011, it had 80,000 students in 240 programs. It now has more than 125,000 students from all over the world. The campus comprises of total 60 acres with rich green and open spaces within the campus. The university has total strength of 50,000 students with 130 programmes offered, the courses ranges from diploma to doctorate level of study. University also houses in campus hostel residence for students with capacity of 5000 students, male and female blocks are separate . 4.1.2 BUILDING ARRANGEMENT 6The university comprises of 12 blocks with additional sports complex which incorporates basketball and tennis court along with swimming pool. The connectivity between the blocks is mainly through pathways adjoining open spaces, however from the study of solid and void it was found that the layout of blocks created featured pack arrangement and such design provides conducive interactive space spaces for the 6 www.wikimapia.com
  22. 22. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 22 students. IMAGE 1:-AMITY CAMPUS IMAGE 2:-Solid And Void Of AMITY campus 4.1.3 INTERACTIVE SPACE 4.1.3.1 Hallway And Pathway In Faculty Route in the context of interactive space is either in hallway and pathway that connects between the buildings and in building itself. Routes of varying sizes in faculty not only important for the movement, also can display the spatial aspects of interactions. These routes provide opportunities for
  23. 23. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 23 students to interact, building has the elements that provide interactive space for the students. 4.1.3.2 Cafeteria And Food Service Area The faculty has kiosks and food service area as shown in image 3. The facilities are created to provide services for students. However, besides being a place for students to have their meals, these spaces also are areas of interaction for students. 4 4.1.3.3 FOYER Another important function of the faculty that can be used as an interactive space is the foyer (see image 4). The foyer breaks the uniformity of the design of the buildings spaces. It creates variation in terms of sizes and space arrangement. The foyer also strengthens the character of the building on a place for academic activities. IMAGE 5:-Foyer entrance IMAGE 4:-Food service areaIMAGE 3:-Food service area
  24. 24. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 24 4.1.3.4 SITTING AREA Sitting areas are provided along the pathways and within the building courtyard which serve as interaction place for students while they are on the way. Landscaping around the sitting areas like benches are blended to each other in feasible way to give a soothing environment for the students to sit and relax while talking. IMAGE 6:-SITTING 4.1.3.5 GREEN AND OPEN AREAS There are green spaces along the blocks which are either serving as a ground for any sports activity or used for landscaping purposes, these open spaces also serve as recreational spots for the students either by involving in activity or just as a spectator, moreover sitting platforms around the trees serve as sitting places used for interactions and chit chatting. Open areas like swimming pool and basketball courts are provided for the purpose of sports recreation which pushes the students enthusiasm towards the team spirit and group work. IMAGE 7:-Green open area
  25. 25. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 25 4.1.3.6 INFERENCES 1. The presence of landscaping elements provide a fruitful environment for interactive space. 2. Cafeteria and food service area has a central courtyard which serves as a gathering place for students and as a interactive space. 3. Sitting in form of benches is provided along the walkways between building blocks for interactions. 4. Scarcity of gathering and meeting places which gives a sense of ownership for students. 4.2 Delhi Technological University 4.2.1 BACKGROUND Delhi Technological University(Formerly Delhi College of Engineering) operated from the Kashmiri Gate campus in the heart of Old Delhi until 1989, when construction began at the New Campus at Bawana Road in May. Moving of operations from Kashmiri Gate to the new 164 acres campus at Bawana Road began in 1995, and the new campus formally started classes for all four years of study starting 1999.The new campus is a lush green campus well connected by road. Facilities include a library, a computer center, a sports complex, eight boys' hostels, six girls' hostels, and a married couples' hostel. The campus has residential facilities for faculty and staff. The campus has an auditorium and an open air theater. 4.2.2 BUILDING ARRANGEMENT The university comprises of academic, hostel administration zones with additional sports complex along with open air theater in the center of university. The connectivity between the blocks is mainly through pathways adjoining open spaces, however from the study of solid and void it was found that the layout of blocks created featured pack arrangement and such design provides conducive interactive space spaces for the students.
  26. 26. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 26 7 IMAGE 8:-Delhi technological university 7 Source: Google Earth Satellite Image, 2015.
  27. 27. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 27 4.2.3 Campus recreational spaces IMAGE 9:-Campus recreational spaces
  28. 28. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 28 4.2.4 INTERACTIVE SPACE 4.2.4.1 Hallway And Pathway In Faculty Route in the context of interactive space is either in hallway and pathway that connects between the buildings and in building itself. Routes of varying sizes in faculty not only important for the movement, also can display the spatial aspects of learning environment. These routes provide opportunities for students to learn informally, building has the elements that provide interactive space for the students. 4.2.4.2 Cafeteria And Food Service Area The college spread over 165 acre of land and with some 4,000 students, has three canteens apart from two small eating outlets. The campus has kiosks and food service area. The facilities are created to provide services for students. However, besides being a place for students to have their meals, these spaces also are areas that can be used as interactive space for students. IMAGE 10:- Food Service Area
  29. 29. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 29 4.2.4.3 FOYER Another important function of the faculty that can be used as an interactive space is the foyer The foyer breaks the uniformity of the design of the buildings spaces. It creates variation in terms of sizes and space arrangement. The foyer also strengthens the character of the building on a place for academic activities. 4.2.4.4 SITTING AREA Sitting areas are provided along the open air theater and within the building courtyard which serve as discussion place for students while they are on the way. Landscaping around the sitting areas like benches are blended to each other in feasible way to give a soothing environment for the students to sit and discuss. IMAGE 11:-AMPHITHEATER 4.2.4.5 GREEN AND OPEN AREAS There are green spaces along the blocks which are either serving as a ground for any sports activity or used for landscaping purposes, these open spaces also serve as recreational spots for the students either by involving in activity or just as a spectator moreover sitting platforms around the trees serve as sitting places used for discussions and chit chatting. Open areas like cricket field and athletic track are provided for the purpose of sports recreation which pushes the students enthusiasm towards the
  30. 30. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 30 team spirit and group work. Moreover provision of open air theater for the performances also serve as interactive space for the students. IMAGE 14:-AMPHITHEATER 4.2.4.6 INFERENCES 1. Centrally located amphitheater used as a gathering place when not used for any performance. 2. Creation of water body around sit out which gives mental relaxation. 3. Lack of landscape around the walkways which support interactions between students. 4. There is scarcity of sitting spaces along walkways which could be used for interactive space. 5. Scarcity of gathering and meeting places which gives a sense of ownership for students. IMAGE 13:-RUNNING TRACK IMAGE 12:-CRICKET GROUND
  31. 31. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 31 4.3 Jawaharlal Nehru University 4.3.1 BACKGROUND The university is an example of the new red brick universities built in the mid-20th century. Located in the southern part of New Delhi and spread over an area of about 1000 acres (4 km²), the campus occupies some of the northernmost reaches of the Aravalli Hills. The campus maintains large patches of scrub and forestland. There are sports clubs in the university. All the clubs organize annual tournaments in the winter semester. There are three main venues where the following games are played:  Sports Complex/JNU Stadium: For football, cricket, volleyball, lawn tennis, weight lifting/gymnasium, yoga and athletics.  Badminton Hall inside the Students Activity Centre.  Central School Grounds Basketball Court. 4.3.2 BUILDING ARRANGEMENT The university comprises of academic, hostel administration zones with additional sports complex along with two open air theater's. There are several dhaba's placed which serve as a gathering point for interactive space. The connectivity between the blocks is mainly through informal pathways adjoining open spaces, however from the study of solid and void it was found that the layout of blocks created featured pack arrangement and such design provides conducive interactive space spaces for the students.
  32. 32. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 32 89 4.3.3 Campus recreational spaces 10 IMAGE 16:-Campus recreational spaces 8 Google satellite image 10 self edited IMAGE 15:-JAWAHARLAL NEHRU UNIVERSITY(JNU)
  33. 33. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 33 4.3.4 INTERACTIVE SPACE 4.3.4.1 Hallway And Pathway In Faculty Route in the context of interactive space is either in hallway and pathway that connects between the buildings and in building itself. Routes of varying sizes in faculty not only important for the movement, also can display the spatial aspects of learning environment. These routes provide opportunities for students to learn informally, building has the elements that provide interactive space spaces for the students. 4.3.4.2 Cafeteria And Food Service Area The college spread over 1000 acre of land and with some 7,304 students, has dhaba canteens apart from two eating outlets. The facilities are created to provide services for students. However, besides being a place for students to have their meals, these spaces also are areas that can be used as a place for interaction for students. 4.3.4.3 FOYER Another important function of the faculty that can be used as an interactive space is the foyer The foyer breaks the uniformity of the design of the IMAGE 18:-DhabaIMAGE 17:Dhaba sitting
  34. 34. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 34 buildings spaces. It creates variation in terms of sizes and space arrangement. The foyer also strengthens the character of the building on a place for academic activities. 4.3.4.4 SITTING AREA Sitting areas are provided in form of elevated stones and natural contours which are used for sitting. basically the sitting is provided in dhaba's of the campus and there is bit of scarcity in terms of sitting spaces of the university. 4.3.4.5 GREEN AND OPEN AREAS There are green spaces along the blocks which are either serving as a ground for any sports activity or used for dhaba culture, these open spaces also serve as recreational spots for the students either by involving in activity or just as a spectator moreover sitting platforms around the trees serve as sitting places used for discussions and chit chatting. Open areas like cricket field and athletic track are provided for the purpose of sports recreation which pushes the students enthusiasm towards the team spirit and group work. Moreover provision of open air theater for the performances also serve as interaction place for the students. IMAGE 20:-SittingIMAGE 19:-SITTING
  35. 35. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 35 4.3.4.6 INFERENCES 1. Presence of dhaba's along with informal sitting gives a sense of ownership of place to the students for free interactions. 2. Landscape in terms of natural mounds of remains of mountain serve as a place of informal sitting and gathering spots. 3. Lack of landscape around the walkways which support interactions between students. 4. Lots of open ground present are neglected for sitting and gathering due to improper maintenance. IMAGE 21:-Amphitheater
  36. 36. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 36 4.4 COMPARITIVE STUDY Table1 lists the place of interactive spaces present in three universities. Table 1:-Interactive space In Faculty S.NO AMITY DTU JNU 1 PLAZA HALLWAY DHABA 2 COURTYARD COURTYARD COURTYARD 3 CAFE AMPHITHEATER AMPHITHEATER 4 . FOYER FOYER REMAINS OFMOUNTAIN 5 FOOD AND BEVERAGES FOOD AND BEVERAGES FOOD AND BEVERAGES 6 SPORTS AREAS SPORTS AREAS SPORTS AREAS 4.4.1 Respondent Survey Analysis This section present the analysis of the data collected from the interviews involving 100 respondents from Amity , 100 respondents from JNU and 100 respondents from Delhi technological university. 4.4.2 Respondent Background A total of 100 students were taken as respondents for information on their views and student profiles. Respondents surveyed students from the Amity and JNU aims to get more precise information and details to identify the level of conducive interactive space spaces in college.
  37. 37. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 37 60, 60% MALES FEMALES 1. Gender Of Respondent Chart 6 and chart 7 show the overall gender of respondents. The chart and show's the most respondents are males. 2. Age Group Of Respondent CHART 7:-Overall Age Group Of Respondents From the chart.8 we conclude that most of the respondents are between 23-27 year old. 15 18 22 45 42 48 32 35 18 8 5 12 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 AMITY JNU DTU 18-22 YEAR OLD 23-27 YEAR OLD 28-31 YEAR OLD 32 YEAR OLD AND ABOVE CHART 7:-Overall Gender Of respondents 66 55 58 34 45 42 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 AMITY JNU DTU MALE FEMALE CHART 6:-Overall Gender Of Respondents
  38. 38. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 38 28 72 COLLEGE NON- RESIDENT 28 4 68 LESS THEN 0.5 KM BTW 0.5-1.0 KM MORE THAN 1.0 KM 28 38 25 42 62 75 0 20 40 60 80 AMITYJNU DTU COLLEGE NON- RESIDENT 27 36 25 8 9 10 65 55 68 0 20 40 60 80 AMITY JNU DTU LESS THAN 0.5 KM BETWEEN 0.5- 1.0 KM MORE THAN 1.0 KM 3. Type Of Accommodation From chart 9 and chart 10 we observe that most of the students and non residents of the campus, hence we conclude that non residents of the college campus are not able to utilize interactive spaces in the off timings of college. CHART 9:-Overall Type Of Accommodation CHART 10:-Overall type of accommodation CHART 11:-Distance From Accommodation To Faculty Of Respondents By Faculty CHART 12:-Overall type of accommodation
  39. 39. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 39 4 3 7 5 5 7 12 10 8 56 63 59 4 4 6 19 15 8 3 15 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 AMITY JNU DTU HALLWAY AND PATHWAY PLAZA COURTYARD FOOD AND BEVERAGES FOYER LANDSCAPE AMPHITHEATER 4.7.2 Use Of Interactive space This section present the use of interactive space. Analysis consist several aspect of use, namely the space use as interactive space; duration of time when interactive spaces are used; and factor of use interactive space in college. 4.9.1 Space That Is Used As Interactive space For the purpose of the analysis, the interactive spaces are categorized into several categories, namely hallway and Plaza, courtyard, food and beverages, cafe, foyer food service area; and landscapes area. From the above chart.13 we conclude that most preferable place for the students to interact and recreate is food and beverages area. CHART 13:-Level Of Use By Informal Learning Space
  40. 40. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 40 45 35 42 48 52 55 41 45 38 32 30 34 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 AMITY JNU DTU 8:00AM-12:00 NOON 12:00NOON-2:00PM 2:00PM-5:00PM 5:00PM-7:00PM 4.9.2 Duration Of Use While At Interactive space CHART 85:-Comparison Duration Of Usage of interactive spaces Charts 14 and 15 shows the comparative usage of interactive spaces according to the timings and we see mostly the interactive spaces are used during the noon time. CHART 14:-Duration Of Used While At Informal Learning Space 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 AMITY JNU DTU
  41. 41. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 41 18 25 16 40 45 40 28 27 30 4 3 4 0 10 20 30 40 50 AMITY JNU DTU VERY IMPORTANT IMPORTANT LESS IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT 15 18 16 45 42 47 35 37 36 5 3 4 0 10 20 30 40 50 AMITY JNU DTU VERY IMPORTANT IMPORTANT LESS IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT 4.9.3 Factor Of Use Interactive space In The Faculty 1. Easy To Meet With Friend We see that interactive spaces are important spots for students to meet with friends and recreate. 2. Comfortable And Easy To Interact Comparative analysis shows that students wishes the interactive spaces to be comfortable and easy to interact. CHART16:-Easy To Meet With Friend CHART17:-Comfortable And Easy To Interact
  42. 42. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 42 25 30 22 55 50 55 15 17 18 5 3 3 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 AMITY JNU DTU VERY IMPORTANT IMPORTANT LESS IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT 35 38 42 45 47 48 18 20 8 2 3 5 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 AMITY JNU DTU VERY IMPORTANT IMPORTANT LESS IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT 3. Easy To Gather And Discuss Students also prefer interactive spaces to which are easy to accommodate a group where they can chit chat and discuss comfortably. 4. Close To Class From above chart we conclude that students prefer interactive spaces to be present near to the class so that they save time between class intervals by approaching these places and getting recreated. CHART18:-Easy To Gathering And Discuss CHART19:-Close To Class
  43. 43. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 43 70 30 COMFORTABLE UNCOMFORTABLE 20 18 15 25 22 30 55 60 55 0 50 100 AMITY JNU DTU EXTREMELY COMFORTABLE VERY COMFORTABLE COMFORTABLE 22 22 1218 18 32 60 60 56 0 50 100 AMITY JNU DTU EXTREMELY COMFORTABLE VERY COMFORTABLE COMFORTABLE 4.9.4 Comfort Level of Interactive space The factors of discomfort are categorized into three categories, namely; existing of table and seating area; hot and inconvenient environment; and not interesting landscapes. 1. Factor Of Comfort 2. Shade And Convenient Environment CHART 20:-Comfort Level of Informal Learning Space CHART 21:-Factor Of Comfortable CHART 9:-Shade And Convenient Environment
  44. 44. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 44 20 12 1618 30 36 62 58 58 0 20 40 60 80 AMITY JNU DTU EXTREMELY COMFORTABLE VERY COMFORTABLE COMFORTABLE 5 8 4 25 15 26 70 77 70 0 20 40 60 80 100 AMITY JNU DTU EXTREMELY DISCOMFORT VERY DISCOMFORT DISCOMFORT 5 6 4 22 14 22 73 80 70 0 20 40 60 80 100 AMITY JNU DTU EXTREMELY DISCOMFORT VERY DISCOMFORT DISCOMFORT 3. Interesting Landscapes 4.9.5 Uncomfortable Level of Interactive space 1. Existing Of Table And Seating Area 2. Hot And Inconvenient Environment CHART22:-Interesting Landscapes CHART23:-Existing Of Table And Seating Area CHART 24:-Hot And Inconvenient Environment
  45. 45. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 45 2 4 3 12 18 21 86 78 76 0 20 40 60 80 100 AMITY JNU DTU EXTREMELY DISCOMFORT VERY DISCOMFORT DISCOMFORT 2 3 57 9 11 55 53 48 32 34 31 4 1 0 20 40 60 AMITY JNU DTU Poorest Quality Poor Quality Moderate Quality Good Quality Best Quality 2 3 64 5 8 18 15 1618 24 31 58 53 55 0 20 40 60 80 AMITY JNU DTU Poorest Quality Poor Quality Moderate Quality Good Quality Best Quality 3. Not Interesting Landscapes 4.9.6 Physical Quality Of Interactive spaces 1. Space design 2. Lighting CHART25:-Not Interesting Landscapes CHART26:-Space design CHART27:-Lighting
  46. 46. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 46 4 3 6 10 6 8 16 15 20 15 22 18 55 54 48 0 20 40 60 AMITY JNU DTU Poorest Quality Poor Quality Moderate Quality Good Quality Best Quality 4 3 6 10 6 8 16 15 20 15 22 18 55 54 48 0 20 40 60 AMITY JNU DTU Poorest Quality Poor Quality Moderate Quality Good Quality Best Quality 3 4 4 8 10 2828 24 24 32 28 18 29 34 22 0 10 20 30 40 AMITY JNU DTU Poorest Quality Poor Quality Moderate Quality Good Quality Best Quality 3. Furniture 4. Infrastructure 5. Landscaping CHART28:-Furniture CHART29:-Infrastructure CHART 30:-Landscaping
  47. 47. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 47 0 0 0 13 10 12 33 31 28 34 36 34 20 23 22 0 10 20 30 40 AMITY JNU DTU NEVER SLIGHT FREQUENT FREQUENT MORE FREQUENT MOST FREQUENT 10 8 1 15 18 8 45 48 52 20 20 18 10 6 12 0 20 40 60 AMITY JNU DTU VERY POOR POOR MODERATE GOOD VERY GOOD 0 0 0 13 10 12 33 31 28 34 36 34 20 23 22 0 10 20 30 40 AMITY JNU DTU NEVER SLIGHT FREQUENT FREQUENT MORE FREQUENT MOST FREQUENT 4.9.7 Level Of Activity In Interactive space 1. Sitting with classmates in interactive spaces to relax and enjoy 2. Planning to recreate in interactive spaces at definite time 4.9.8 Performance Element Of Interactive space Space 1. Adaptability Adaptability of space consist spaces that support activities and people change. Besides that, adaptability space also supports a multiple of interaction levels. CHART31:- Sitting with classmates in interactive spaces to relax and enjoy CHART 33:-Adaptability IMAGE32:-Planning to recreate in interactive spaces at definite time
  48. 48. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 48 10 8 10 15 14 8 42 52 55 23 20 18 10 6 12 0 20 40 60 AMITY JNU DTU VERY POOR POOR MODERATE GOOD VERY GOOD 10 8 1212 11 6 45 48 42 25 14 22 8 12 12 0 20 40 60 AMITY JNU DTU VERY POOR POOR MODERATE GOOD VERY GOOD 12 8 1210 14 6 48 52 46 22 10 22 8 8 7 0 20 40 60 AMITY JNU DTU VERY POOR POOR MODERATE GOOD VERY GOOD 2. Social The social element includes spaces that support collaboration, interaction and engagement among faculty communities to perform the interactions. 3. Healthful Healthful element is spaces that promote the safety and physical well- being of students and faculties. 4. Healthful Healthful element is spaces that promote the safety and physical well- being of students and faculties. CHART 34:-Social CHART35:-Healthful CHART36:-Healthful
  49. 49. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 49 10 8 912 10 12 52 48 54 18 12 27 8 6 7 0 20 40 60 AMITY JNU DTU VERY POOR POOR MODERATE GOOD VERY GOOD 9 8 1012 10 12 54 48 52 27 12 18 6 6 8 0 20 40 60 AMITY JNU DTU VERY POOR POOR MODERATE GOOD VERY GOOD 12 8 810 12 14 52 46 48 29 10 18 6 8 8 0 20 40 60 AMITY JNU DTU VERY POOR POOR MODERATE GOOD VERY GOOD 5. Sustainability Sustainability element is the spaces those are environmentally responsible. 6. Resourceful Resourceful element of performance in interactive space that support long term efficiency and support use of assets. 7. Stimulating Stimulating element of performance for interactive space is a space that attracts people to use it and spark thinking overtime. CHART37:-Sustainability CHART38:-Resourceful CHART39:-Stimulating
  50. 50. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 50 0 10 20 30 RESPONSE 9 14 22 28 13 9 14 LARGEST ROLE LARGER ROLE LARGE ROLE MEDIUM ROLE SMALL ROLE SMALLER ROLE SMALLEST ROLE 0 10 20 30 40 RESPONSE 8 14 20 31 15 6 15 LARGEST ROLE LARGER ROLE LARGE ROLE MEDIUM ROLE SMALL ROLE SMALLER ROLE 4.9.9 The Parties Driving Interactive space Design For the purpose of analysis, six parties of players in driving interactive space design can be used to assess the interactive space, namely administration; management; maintenance; planning and design; construction; and students. In the regard to analysis these elements, scale are used in this analysis that are divided into seven ranks, namely largest role, larger role, large role, medium role, small role, smaller role and smallest role. 1. Administration Management CHART 10:-Administration response CHART 11:-Management response
  51. 51. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 51 0 10 20 30 RESPONSE 10 12 24 27 18 6 15 LARGEST ROLE LARGER ROLE LARGE ROLE MEDIUM ROLE SMALL ROLE SMALLER ROLE 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 RESPONSE 12 10 20 27 16 8 16 LARGEST ROLE LARGER ROLE LARGE ROLE MEDIUM ROLE SMALL ROLE SMALLER ROLE SMALLEST ROLE Maintenance From the above observations we can conclude that administration and management department majorly plays medium role in the development and maintenance of active interactive spaces. 2. Planning And Design Planning and design practices of enhancing interactive spaces plays major role in motivating students moving towards interactive spaces inside the college premises. Spaces should be inviting and welcoming with comfortable furnishings. Spaces should have plenty of natural and variable light, good ventilation and good quality acoustic treatment CHART 12:-Maintenance response CHART 13:-Planning and design response
  52. 52. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 52 0 5 10 15 20 25 RESPONSE 15 17 14 18 22 12 16 LARGEST ROLE LARGER ROLE LARGE ROLE MEDIUM ROLE SMALL ROLE SMALLER ROLE 0 5 10 15 20 RESPONSE 17 18 20 18 17 12 administration maintainance management planning and design construction student 3. Students From the above chart we conclude that the students role in the development of interactive spaces is very minor, as they are the users and they use what they get according to their preference. They are not active participants in the planning and construction process, they only maintains the sense of place making by effective participation in these interactive spaces. 4. Overall Ranking Of Parties In Driving Interactive space Design Hence, the major task in providing interactive recreational opportunities in a college campus is derived by the management authorities, that not only approves the proposals but also provides the required funds. CHART 14:-Students response CHART 15:-Overall response
  53. 53. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 53 CHAPTER 5 CONCLUSION AND RECOMMONDATION 5.1 Conclusions 1. Interactive spaces plays a vital role in students life by active participation in the activities taking place in these spaces and sometimes just getting recreated in passive form. 2. There is a connection between the surrounding environment and an individual which is indirectly responsible for making the conversation go in a healthy manner with proper comfort level. 3. Informal spaces to interact with each other are the benchmark for a student to explore himself in a casual way and through friendly appreciations an individual gains confidence level which adds to his personality development. 4. Proper landscaping and informal sit outs within the gathering spot plays a significance role in motivating the students to visit these areas for group gatherings . 5. Informal spaces gives an environment where students get a feeling of ownership and are more free to interact and this fruitful interaction results in the rise of confidence level of an individual. 6. If there is no involvement of the Office of Development and Office of Facilities Management in the development and management of interactive spaces then these spaces will not b given importance and will be neglected due to improper maintenance.
  54. 54. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 54 7. To create interactions among students is not an impossible task and all parties involved should strive and be prepared to accept the changes and challenges of a more challenging future. 5.2 Recommendation The recommendations intend to create conducive environment of the interactive space so that they can be used effectively by the study that could improve the quality and standard of interaction level. Following are some recommendations based on the problems identified. 1. Interactive space spaces should be designed to support active engagement rather than passive , interaction occurs when students are engaged in an active participation within a interactive space. 2. Spaces should avoid design elements like fixed amphitheatre and seating that support non-natural separation of academics and students and utilize mobile furnishings and technology that allow a more shared approach to interact. 3. Elements like the quality and cleanliness of the space, the reliability and functionality of its technology, the colors on walls, floors and in furnishings, art work and imagery, and the nature of signage all contribute to sending a message to the users of the space 4. The design of university campuses, buildings and interactive space spaces needs to support opportunities for accidental or unexpected interaction between students and academics.
  55. 55. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 55 5. The addition of simple and comfortable seating in walk ways and in corridors where academics and students are likely to meet is another way to support and encourage higher levels interaction outside the classroom. 6. For the potential of any interactive spaces to be realized there should be spaces not only in which students want to be, but also spaces in which students are motivated to be involved in the interactive activities. 7. An interactive space should be accessible, comfortable and habitable for all its users. 8. The design of interactive spaces should include consideration of student access to comfort elements including food and beverage. 9. The transition spaces can be considered as hallways, pathways and foyer that interconnected to other building spaces. The transition spaces should provide benches for sitting where they can talk out of the flow of pedestrian walkway. 10. Some interactive space spaces have adjacent indoor and outdoor areas. The outdoor spaces can be considered as courtyard, amphitheatre, and square and open-plan area. 11. Planting shade trees and providing sitting areas makes these spaces more usable, and students tend to linger before going inside for class.
  56. 56. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 56 CHAPTER 6 REFERENCE AND BIBLIOGRAPHY 6.1 REFERENCE 1. The use of informal learning space by students in uitm shah alam campus Author: Muhammad hilmy bin muslim 2. www.educause.edu/learningspaces 3. Reinforcing Community Campus Gathering Places AUTHOR :Dunbar/Jones PLC PAGE-7-9 4. Reinforcing Community Campus Gathering Places AUTHOR :Dunbar/Jones PLC PAGE-15-20 5. A Study of Campus Recreation Usage: Developing Our Student Body into Well-Balanced Graduates By Carson Hardy And Garrett Hellman. 6. www.wikimapia.com 6.2 BIBLIOGRAPHY 1. The use of informal learning space by students in uitm shah alam campus Author: Muhammad hilmy bin muslim 2. www.educause.edu/learningspaces 3. Reinforcing Community Campus Gathering Places AUTHOR :Dunbar/Jones PLC PAGE-7-9 4. Reinforcing Community Campus Gathering Places AUTHOR :Dunbar/Jones PLC PAGE-15-20 5. A Study of Campus Recreation Usage: Developing Our Student Body into Well-Balanced Graduates By Carson Hardy And Garrett Hellman.
  57. 57. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 57 6. www.wikimapia.com 7. Reinforcing Community Campus Gathering Places Design Guidelines The University of Iowa. 8. The University of North Texas Campus Space Assessment Final November 2012.
  58. 58. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT’S INTERACTIVE SPACES IN COLLEGE CAMPUS 2015 58 TABLE OF FIGURE IMAGE 1:-AMITY CAMPUS .............................................................................. 22 IMAGE 2:-Solid And Void Of AMITY campus.................................................... 22 IMAGE 3:-Food service area............................................................................. 23 IMAGE 3:-Food service area............................................................................. 23 IMAGE 4:-Foyer entrance ................................................................................. 23 IMAGE 5:-SITTING ........................................................................................... 24 IMAGE 6:-Green open area ............................................................................. 24 IMAGE 7:-Delhi technological university ........................................................... 26 IMAGE 8:-Campus recreational spaces ............................................................ 27 IMAGE 9:- Food Service Area........................................................................... 28 IMAGE 10:-AMPHITHEATER ........................................................................... 29 IMAGE 13:-AMPHITHEATER ........................................................................... 30 IMAGE 11:-CRICKET GROUND....................................................................... 30 IMAGE 12:-RUNNING TRACK.......................................................................... 30 IMAGE 15:-Campus recreational spaces .......................................................... 32 IMAGE 14:-JAWAHARLAL NEHRU UNIVERSITY(JNU) .................................. 32 IMAGE 16:Dhaba sitting.................................................................................... 33 IMAGE 17:-Dhaba............................................................................................. 33 IMAGE 18:-SITTING ......................................................................................... 33 IMAGE 19:-Sitting ............................................................................................. 33 IMAGE 20:-Amphitheater .................................................................................. 33

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