Maximizing Your Team’s Creative
Potential
Quality Forum 2014
Melissa Crump and Katie Procter
SPEED
NETWORKING
What is your pet peeve in your
improvement work and why?
Speed Networking – Why start this way?
What did you notice?
•Liberates participation immediately for everyone provided
the...
SPEED Networking – keys to success
•Introduction – very brief but important in the case
of a potentially reluctant audienc...
•Done in pairs as strangers for 2 minutes each
(total 4 minutes per pair timed by facilitator)
•Encouraging new connection...
IDENTIFYING YOUR PROBLEM
SETTING YOUR GOAL(S)
CREATING AN AIM STATEMENT AND
“HOW-TO” MEASURES
I want to make a change/improvement
• Building blocks for change
• Leadership support
• Infrastructure to support and sustain the
change
The Whirlwind (AKA the everyday
STUFF)
Being successful in the whirlwind
•
•
•
•

Team focus on no more that 3 goals at a time
1 to 2 goals are optimal
You want ...
There will always be more
good ideas then there
are capacity to execute
How to choose your goals
• Either from within the whirlwind (badly
broken and need fixing)
Or
• A key element of your care...
Getting to the heart of the problem
• We don’t spend enough time on the study
• If we don’t get to the heart of the proble...
Sometimes more money,
more people and more time
is not the answer
People are not the
problem...the problem is
in the process or system
Research your problem
• Speak with people (getting staff involved from
the beginning)
• Observe the environment
• Process ...
Getting to the heart of the problem)
• May be based on a problem (Root cause
analysis)
– 5 whys process map form/Ishikawa ...
Reminder
• If at the end of your research (5 whys,
cause/effect diagram, etc) your problem is a
person…dig deeper…find the...
Where to start?
Rank ideas (potential goals by impact)
Choosing your Goals
Rules to creating successful Goals
• No team focuses on more than 2 goals
• The battle you choose must win the war (your
g...
How to choose your goals
• Ask:
– What is most important?
– If every other area of our organizations/unit
remained at its ...
How to pick your goal
•
•
•
•
•
•

Does it align with the organizations goals
Is it measurable
Is it worth measuring
Is it...
Executing your goal
Creating an Innovative culture
• Cadence of accountability allow release of
creativity
• Weekly meetings encourage experim...
Goal session Toolbox
•
•
•
•
•

Speed networking
Triz
25 get your 10
Discovery action dialogue (DAD)
Discussion
Goal Sessions (weekly meetings)
• Cadence of accountability (weekly meetings)
– Same day
– Same time

• No longer than 30 ...
Goal session
• Report on commitments
• Review of scoreboard (Review success and
challenges)
• Plan (commitments for the ne...
Keeping score
• Everyone must know the score
• People do not engage if they don’t know the
score
• Keeping score drives en...
Creating your scoreboard
• Ask:
– Is it simple?
– Is it visible to the team? (visibility drives
accountability)
– Are your...
Scoreboard
Staff scoreboard
• Simple
• Visible

Leader scoreboard
• Full of data
• complex
Accountable, Engaged,
Innovative Community
CREATING A GOOD STORYBOARD
A good storyboard….
•
•
•
•

Simple
Visible
Engaging
Has a score?? (remember we are trying to win
a race)
MIND MAPPING
DISCOVERY & ACTION DIALOGUES
A TOOL FOR GETTING STARTED WITH
CONVERSATIONS
What is a Discovery & Action Dialogue?
• Discover what people are already doing that works
Positive Deviants
What is a Discovery & Action Dialogue?
• Discover what people are already doing that works
Positive Deviants
• These devia...
What is a Discovery & Action Dialogue?
• Discover what people are already doing that works
Positive Deviants
• These devia...
The “DAD”: 6 Questions
1. What do you know about (the problem) / how do you know when
it’s present?
2. What do YOU do abou...
The Details …
Q1:
How do you know when a
resident is on inappropriate
antipsychotics?
(the problem is present)

• Affirm t...
The Details …
Q2:
How do YOU contribute to
reducing inappropriate
antipsychotic use?
(solving the problem)

• Focus on per...
The Details …
Q3:
What prevents you from
doing this or taking these
actions all the time?

• Identify real barriers and
co...
The Details …
Q4:
Is there anyone you know who • Establish that getting around
barriers is possible
is able to frequently ...
The Details …
Q5:
Do you have any ideas?

• Identify the supports that make
the desired behaviour more
likely
• Provide an...
The Details …
Q6:
What needs to be done to
make it happen? Any
volunteers?

• Identify action steps, target
dates & feedba...
The Details …
Q7:
Who else needs to be
involved?

• Who else can we bring in?
• Widen the circle of people
involved in dis...
Getting Started with a DAD
• What is the problem you are going to talk about?
– Inappropriate antipsychotics?
– BPSD?
– Cu...
Arranging Space & Materials for the
Conversation (this is perfect for Huddles)
• Where? When? With Whom?
Arranging Space & Materials for the
Conversation
• Where? When? With Whom?
• Have someone else record the responses so you...
Arranging Space & Materials for the
Conversation
• Where? When? With Whom?
• Have someone else record the responses so you...
Arranging Space & Materials for the
Conversation
• Where? When? With Whom?
• Have someone else record the responses so you...
Everyone Who Touches the
Resident Can Participate
• Everyone interested in solving the problem
Everyone Who Touches the
Resident Can Participate
• Everyone interested in solving the problem
• Look to your process map!
Everyone Who Touches the
Resident Can Participate
• Everyone interested in solving the problem
• Look to your process map!...
Everyone Who Touches the
Resident Can Participate
•
•
•
•

Everyone interested in solving the problem
Look to your process...
Everyone Who Touches the
Resident Can Participate
•
•
•
•

Everyone interested in solving the problem
Look to your process...
Facilitator “Do” Guidelines
• Start with the purpose
“We are here to _______________!”
• “Give” the questions to the group...
Facilitator “Do” Guidelines
How do you handle cynical responses?
“If I understand you correctly, no one has ever done this...
More “Do’s”
• Work through all or some of the questions without
worrying about the order
AND/OR
• Follow the conversation ...
More “Do’s”
• Work through all or some of the questions without
worrying about the order
AND/OR
• Follow the conversation ...
More “Do’s”
• Work through all or some of the questions without
worrying about the order
AND/OR
• Follow the conversation ...
Facilitator “Don’t” Guidelines
• Don’t answer questions that haven’t been asked
directly to you

Even then, ask the group ...
More “Don’ts”
• Don’t continue the conversation when others need
to be present -“Nothing about me without me!”
Invite them...
More “Don’ts”
• Don’t continue the conversation when others need
to be present -“Nothing about me without me!”
Invite them...
General Tips & Traps
• Hold the dialogue out in the open
• Make impromptu invitations as you enter the area
• Create an “i...
General Tips & Traps
• Talk less than participants, and encourage everyone
to share stories and “sift” for action opportun...
WILL GET YOU

CROWD SOURCING
What is an idea that you have that might influence a
behavior shift with a group of clinicians in your working
environment...
•5 rounds of 20 seconds each
•Pass cards around while moving around the room – do not look
at the cards while doing so!
•
...
What is made possible?
• A large crowd can generate and sort their bold ideas
for action in 20 minutes or less!!
• Helps s...
• Innovations are owned and more likely to
endure
• Sparks synergy and coherence in diversity
(difference)
• Gives novice ...
Ideas for where to use
• Prioritizing ideas and bringing coherence after
a meeting
• For illuminating bold ideas at the st...
Variations
• Ask “If you could un-make one decision that is
holding us back, what would it be? What is your first
step to ...
• What priority should we be taking with our
work?
• You can write the work already identified by
the team (say from a TRI...
Thank you!!

Katie Procter
kprocter@bcpsqc.ca
Melissa Crump
Storyboard template
Title Page
Anecdote
• The story that will pull at heart strings
Background
• What does the research/evidence telling
you about your work? Data? Hard facts?
Numbers? Costs?
Aim of Your Project
Team Members
Changes Tested
Results so Far
Lessons Learned
Next Steps: Future Focus
Contact Information
Maximizing Your Team's Creative Potential
Maximizing Your Team's Creative Potential
Maximizing Your Team's Creative Potential
Maximizing Your Team's Creative Potential
Maximizing Your Team's Creative Potential
Maximizing Your Team's Creative Potential
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Maximizing Your Team's Creative Potential

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This presentation was delivered in session A7 of Quality Forum 2014 by:

Katie Procter
Quality Leader
BCPSQC

Melissa Crump
Infection Control Practitioner
Vancouver Coastal Health

Publicado en: Salud y medicina
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Maximizing Your Team's Creative Potential

  1. 1. Maximizing Your Team’s Creative Potential Quality Forum 2014 Melissa Crump and Katie Procter
  2. 2. SPEED NETWORKING
  3. 3. What is your pet peeve in your improvement work and why?
  4. 4. Speed Networking – Why start this way? What did you notice? •Liberates participation immediately for everyone provided the questions are engaging!! •Attracts deeper engagement around your questions •Invites stories to deepen as they are repeated •Emphasizes the power of loose connections in relationships •Gets you energized and engaged quickly
  5. 5. SPEED Networking – keys to success •Introduction – very brief but important in the case of a potentially reluctant audience •Questions are simple but must matter to participants inviting engagement AND be reflective with what do you want them to explore together •Standing up and milling around across the room
  6. 6. •Done in pairs as strangers for 2 minutes each (total 4 minutes per pair timed by facilitator) •Encouraging new connections with fast pace •Not 1, Not 2, but 3 rounds •If you choose to share output in a group share back, do it carefully and preserve confidentiality
  7. 7. IDENTIFYING YOUR PROBLEM SETTING YOUR GOAL(S) CREATING AN AIM STATEMENT AND “HOW-TO” MEASURES
  8. 8. I want to make a change/improvement
  9. 9. • Building blocks for change • Leadership support • Infrastructure to support and sustain the change
  10. 10. The Whirlwind (AKA the everyday STUFF)
  11. 11. Being successful in the whirlwind • • • • Team focus on no more that 3 goals at a time 1 to 2 goals are optimal You want to apply more energy against goals Humans are hardwired to do one thing at a time with excellence
  12. 12. There will always be more good ideas then there are capacity to execute
  13. 13. How to choose your goals • Either from within the whirlwind (badly broken and need fixing) Or • A key element of your care delivery that isn't being addressed or delivered.
  14. 14. Getting to the heart of the problem • We don’t spend enough time on the study • If we don’t get to the heart of the problem we jump to solutions
  15. 15. Sometimes more money, more people and more time is not the answer
  16. 16. People are not the problem...the problem is in the process or system
  17. 17. Research your problem • Speak with people (getting staff involved from the beginning) • Observe the environment • Process map/value stream map • Spagetti diagram
  18. 18. Getting to the heart of the problem) • May be based on a problem (Root cause analysis) – 5 whys process map form/Ishikawa Diagram
  19. 19. Reminder • If at the end of your research (5 whys, cause/effect diagram, etc) your problem is a person…dig deeper…find the process error
  20. 20. Where to start? Rank ideas (potential goals by impact)
  21. 21. Choosing your Goals
  22. 22. Rules to creating successful Goals • No team focuses on more than 2 goals • The battle you choose must win the war (your goal must somehow impact the strategic direction of the organization) • Senior Leaders must define the strategic direction of the organization but must allow the units to define their goals • Your goal must have a finish line (x to y by when)
  23. 23. How to choose your goals • Ask: – What is most important? – If every other area of our organizations/unit remained at its current level of performance, what is the one area where change would have the greatest impact? – What are the greatest strengths of the team that can leverage the overall goal – What are the areas that the team needs to improve on
  24. 24. How to pick your goal • • • • • • Does it align with the organizations goals Is it measurable Is it worth measuring Is it ongoing process or “once done” Who owns the results Who owns the games
  25. 25. Executing your goal
  26. 26. Creating an Innovative culture • Cadence of accountability allow release of creativity • Weekly meetings encourage experimentation of new ideas, problem solving, shared learning • Forum for engagement • Brings out the best thinking in each team member
  27. 27. Goal session Toolbox • • • • • Speed networking Triz 25 get your 10 Discovery action dialogue (DAD) Discussion
  28. 28. Goal Sessions (weekly meetings) • Cadence of accountability (weekly meetings) – Same day – Same time • No longer than 30 mins • Accountability – making commitment to the team that impacts the goal
  29. 29. Goal session • Report on commitments • Review of scoreboard (Review success and challenges) • Plan (commitments for the next week, clearing the path for success) Commitments Plan Scoreboard Goal
  30. 30. Keeping score • Everyone must know the score • People do not engage if they don’t know the score • Keeping score drives engagement
  31. 31. Creating your scoreboard • Ask: – Is it simple? – Is it visible to the team? (visibility drives accountability) – Are your measures visible (team needs to see they are impacting the goal) – Can you see if you are winning or losing? (Enable you to see where you are now and where you should be now)
  32. 32. Scoreboard Staff scoreboard • Simple • Visible Leader scoreboard • Full of data • complex
  33. 33. Accountable, Engaged, Innovative Community
  34. 34. CREATING A GOOD STORYBOARD
  35. 35. A good storyboard…. • • • • Simple Visible Engaging Has a score?? (remember we are trying to win a race)
  36. 36. MIND MAPPING
  37. 37. DISCOVERY & ACTION DIALOGUES A TOOL FOR GETTING STARTED WITH CONVERSATIONS
  38. 38. What is a Discovery & Action Dialogue? • Discover what people are already doing that works Positive Deviants
  39. 39. What is a Discovery & Action Dialogue? • Discover what people are already doing that works Positive Deviants • These deviants face the same restrictions as everyone else but find their own solutions Hidden and untapped solutions
  40. 40. What is a Discovery & Action Dialogue? • Discover what people are already doing that works Positive Deviants • These deviants face the same restrictions as everyone else but find their own solutions Hidden and untapped solutions • They gain support as colleagues see the solutions working and then adapt the new thinking/behaving Momentum spreads
  41. 41. The “DAD”: 6 Questions 1. What do you know about (the problem) / how do you know when it’s present? 2. What do YOU do about it? 3. What are the BARRIERS that prevent you from doing (the right thing/process) 100% of the time? 4. Who are the Positive Deviants that are overcoming these barriers? 5. WHO ELSE needs to be part of this conversation? (“Don’t decide about me without me.”) How do we invite them to join the action? 6. What other ideas do you have? Any volunteers?
  42. 42. The Details … Q1: How do you know when a resident is on inappropriate antipsychotics? (the problem is present) • Affirm that we all have existing knowledge of the problem • Provide opportunities to get questions on the table
  43. 43. The Details … Q2: How do YOU contribute to reducing inappropriate antipsychotic use? (solving the problem) • Focus on personal practices, NOT on what other people don’t do • Amplify / confirm the participant’s knowledge of effective practices
  44. 44. The Details … Q3: What prevents you from doing this or taking these actions all the time? • Identify real barriers and constraints • Ask: What prevents you? vs Why don’t you?
  45. 45. The Details … Q4: Is there anyone you know who • Establish that getting around barriers is possible is able to frequently address BPSD without inappropriate • Identify the existing-butmedications? uncommon successful strategies (solve the problem, overcome barriers)
  46. 46. The Details … Q5: Do you have any ideas? • Identify the supports that make the desired behaviour more likely • Provide an opportunity for participants to generate and share new ideas for enabling the desired behavior
  47. 47. The Details … Q6: What needs to be done to make it happen? Any volunteers? • Identify action steps, target dates & feedback loops for metrics • Invite volunteers for each action step (capture ideas that don’t yet have an identified action plan or volunteer)
  48. 48. The Details … Q7: Who else needs to be involved? • Who else can we bring in? • Widen the circle of people involved in discovering solutions, drawing in unusual suspects
  49. 49. Getting Started with a DAD • What is the problem you are going to talk about? – Inappropriate antipsychotics? – BPSD? – Culture? – Care Planning? • How will you get people to come? • When will you hold the meeting or meetings? • How will you follow-up with the information you learn?
  50. 50. Arranging Space & Materials for the Conversation (this is perfect for Huddles) • Where? When? With Whom?
  51. 51. Arranging Space & Materials for the Conversation • Where? When? With Whom? • Have someone else record the responses so you can facilitate
  52. 52. Arranging Space & Materials for the Conversation • Where? When? With Whom? • Have someone else record the responses so you can facilitate • Room set-up: – Chairs in a circle OR standing around a flip chart
  53. 53. Arranging Space & Materials for the Conversation • Where? When? With Whom? • Have someone else record the responses so you can facilitate • Room set-up: – Chairs in a circle OR standing around a flip chart • 5 – 15 people with diverse roles and experience is an asset, although one-on-one can be powerful too!
  54. 54. Everyone Who Touches the Resident Can Participate • Everyone interested in solving the problem
  55. 55. Everyone Who Touches the Resident Can Participate • Everyone interested in solving the problem • Look to your process map!
  56. 56. Everyone Who Touches the Resident Can Participate • Everyone interested in solving the problem • Look to your process map! • Multiple disciplines and different roles
  57. 57. Everyone Who Touches the Resident Can Participate • • • • Everyone interested in solving the problem Look to your process map! Multiple disciplines and different roles Who else? – Residents – Families – Volunteers
  58. 58. Everyone Who Touches the Resident Can Participate • • • • Everyone interested in solving the problem Look to your process map! Multiple disciplines and different roles Who else? – Residents – Families – Volunteers • Make sure everyone has an equal opportunity to participate
  59. 59. Facilitator “Do” Guidelines • Start with the purpose “We are here to _______________!” • “Give” the questions to the group, then wait at least 20 seconds for a response Sing Happy Birthday to yourself • Encourage quiet people to talk
  60. 60. Facilitator “Do” Guidelines How do you handle cynical responses? “If I understand you correctly, no one has ever done this successfully or well.” “What would you do if there was an opportunity for change?” “Can you please re-frame what you just said with a question beginning with ‘what’ or ‘how’? Include some kind of action.
  61. 61. More “Do’s” • Work through all or some of the questions without worrying about the order AND/OR • Follow the conversation with other questions
  62. 62. More “Do’s” • Work through all or some of the questions without worrying about the order AND/OR • Follow the conversation with other questions • Keep respect at the forefront of the conversation
  63. 63. More “Do’s” • Work through all or some of the questions without worrying about the order AND/OR • Follow the conversation with other questions • Keep respect at the forefront of the conversation • Have someone record responses on flip charts
  64. 64. Facilitator “Don’t” Guidelines • Don’t answer questions that haven’t been asked directly to you Even then, ask the group members to provide an answer (they are the wise ones who will have the answers) • Don’t miss opportunities to “catch butterflies” Record ideas that got missed in the conversation
  65. 65. More “Don’ts” • Don’t continue the conversation when others need to be present -“Nothing about me without me!” Invite them to the next dialogue
  66. 66. More “Don’ts” • Don’t continue the conversation when others need to be present -“Nothing about me without me!” Invite them to the next dialogue • Avoid responding positively or negatively to contributions You might ask, “How/What do others think or feel about this suggestion?”
  67. 67. General Tips & Traps • Hold the dialogue out in the open • Make impromptu invitations as you enter the area • Create an “informal climate”, starting with introductions and a story if appropriate • Maintain eye contact and sit with the group (not higher or far away)
  68. 68. General Tips & Traps • Talk less than participants, and encourage everyone to share stories and “sift” for action opportunities • Draw out stories that help people make a leap of understanding from a small example of behavior change to a larger shift in values and/or resource sharing • Demonstrate genuine curiosity in everyone’s offerings without answering the questions yourself
  69. 69. WILL GET YOU CROWD SOURCING
  70. 70. What is an idea that you have that might influence a behavior shift with a group of clinicians in your working environment/project? What would be your first step/PDSA towards that goal. Write your idea and your first step on the ONE SIDE of the recipe card on your tables. NO NAMES BE REALISTIC WRITE LEGIBLY
  71. 71. •5 rounds of 20 seconds each •Pass cards around while moving around the room – do not look at the cards while doing so! • •At the end of each round (bells), read the idea on the front of the card •If you get the same card switch it off with someone immediately •Rate the idea from 0 – 5 ( 0 being the lowest and 5 being the highest rating •At the end of the 5 rounds you will have 5 numbers on the back of the card that will total something out of 25 •Add the numbers
  72. 72. What is made possible? • A large crowd can generate and sort their bold ideas for action in 20 minutes or less!! • Helps spread innovations • Helps people to notice patterns in what emerges • Helps you to prioritize your work depending on how you set up your question or what you want the team to work out
  73. 73. • Innovations are owned and more likely to endure • Sparks synergy and coherence in diversity (difference) • Gives novice innovators and quiet ones a bold voice
  74. 74. Ideas for where to use • Prioritizing ideas and bringing coherence after a meeting • For illuminating bold ideas at the start of a conference or task force meeting
  75. 75. Variations • Ask “If you could un-make one decision that is holding us back, what would it be? What is your first step to un-make it?” • Ask “What courageous conversation are we not having? What first step could spark our courage?” • Ask “What do you hope can happen for us in the future? What practical first step can you take now to tip the balance in this direction?”
  76. 76. • What priority should we be taking with our work? • You can write the work already identified by the team (say from a TRIZ) on the cards and have the group prioritize where to start. Keep knocking off the top 5 or 10 as you can re-do the exercise until you are complete.
  77. 77. Thank you!! Katie Procter kprocter@bcpsqc.ca Melissa Crump
  78. 78. Storyboard template Title Page
  79. 79. Anecdote • The story that will pull at heart strings
  80. 80. Background • What does the research/evidence telling you about your work? Data? Hard facts? Numbers? Costs?
  81. 81. Aim of Your Project
  82. 82. Team Members
  83. 83. Changes Tested
  84. 84. Results so Far
  85. 85. Lessons Learned
  86. 86. Next Steps: Future Focus
  87. 87. Contact Information

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