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bimstec bilia_2017_final

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Presentation on BIMSTEC and Regional Connectivity

Publicado en: Economía y finanzas
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bimstec bilia_2017_final

  1. 1. BIMSTEC & Regional Connectivity BIMSTEC Secretariat, Dhaka, 07 April 2017 S.M. NAZMUL HASAN Director BIMSTEC Secretariat, Dhaka, Bangladesh dir_bd@bimstec.org www.bimstec.org
  2. 2. An Overview of BIMSTEC  Established as a Regional Organization on 06 June, 1997.  BIST-EC to BIMSTEC • Economic bloc to Multi-Sectoral Org • Myanmar joined on 22 Dec 1997 • Nepal and Bhutan joined in Feb 2004  Bridge between SA and SEA  A platform for intra-regional cooperation between SAARC & ASEAN
  3. 3. Overview/Contd.  Member States- 07  Some basic facts: - 1.5 billion (22% of Global population) - 3.64% of the world’s surface area - Combined GDP- US$ 2.7 trillion - Trade potential-US$ 59 billion - Average Eco Growth -6.5% - Intra-regional trade US$ 77 billion (SAARC- US$ 44 billion, 2013)
  4. 4. Eastern Indian Ocean regional trade networks, c. 1300-1500 Adopted from © Ports-of-Trade, Maritime Diasporas, and Networks of Trade and Cultural Integration in the Bay of Bengal Region of the Indian Ocean: c. 1300-1500. Kenneth R. Hall. Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient 53 (2010) 109-145
  5. 5. Objectives of BIMSTEC  Promote free trade area  Increase cross border connectivity, investment and tourism  Promote technical cooperation
  6. 6. BIMSTEC Areas of Cooperation Sector • Trade and Investment • Technology • Energy • Transport and Communication • Tourism • Fisheries • Agriculture • Cultural Cooperation • Environment and Disaster Management • Public Health • People-to-People Contact • Poverty Alleviation • Counter-Terrorism and Transnational Crime • Climate Change Lead Country - Bangladesh - Sri Lanka - Myanmar - India - India - Thailand - Myanmar - Bhutan - India - Thailand - Thailand - Nepal - India - Bangladesh
  7. 7. Establishment of Secretariat MoA signed at the 3rd Summit in Nay Pyi Taw, Myanmar in March 2014. Secretariat started functioning in Dhaka, Bangladesh in July 2014. Hon’ble Prime Minister of Bangladesh inaugurated on 13 September 2015.  Secretariat added momentum in its forward movement through monitoring and follow up of important decisions which required attention.
  8. 8. Institutional Arrangement & Structure Summit:03 Ministerial Meetings: 14 SOM:17 PM-SOM:02 JWG/Sub-Group BWG:152 Specialized Task Forces TEMM, Cultural MM, Tourism MM, Energy MM
  9. 9. Chairmanship of BIMSTEC By rotation: Bangladesh (1997-1999), (2005-2006) India (2000), (2006-2008) Myanmar (2001-2002), (2009-2014) Sri Lanka (2002-2003) Thailand (2004- 2005) Nepal (2014-till date)
  10. 10. BIMSTEC’s Key Achievements  Identified priorities on infrastructure and connectivity in regions Finalized the MoU on Trans Grid Connectivity.  Operationalization of BIMSTEC Energy Centre in Bangaluru  BIMSTEC Free Trade Area [2004], progress is being consciously made.  Signed BIMSTEC Convention on Suppression of terrorism [2009] Finalized Convention on MLA in Criminal Matters Conventions on Trafficking in Persons, TSP and Extradition in-progress BTILS
  11. 11. The Concept of Connectivity  ‘flattening’ the world  Cornerstone of regional economic cooperation and integration  Enhanced Connectivity could result in: - ASEAN and East Asia’s cumulative gain could be over 5% of GDP for Cambodia, Myanmar, Thailand and Viet Nam and over 2% for India [Economic Research Unit 2011].  Improved connectivity along with trade facilitation can significantly enhance regional trade by reducing transportation time and trade costs
  12. 12. Connectivity Matters  Global flows (trade, people, finance and data) add between $250 billion to $400 billion (15% to 25%) to global GDP growth each year  Most connected countries can expect to increase GDP growth from flows up to 40% more than the least connected countries  Connectedness Index 2012: 1. Germany 2. Hong Kong 3. USA 4. Singapore 5. UK • India and Brazil jumped 15 and 16 ranks respectively because of participation in global flows of services Source: No Ordinary Disruption by R Dobbs et al, 2015 Global interconnectedness re-writing the rules of business and inter-state relations
  13. 13. Factors Shaping Connectivity 7-Key drivers: • Physical connectivity (Road, Rail, Air, Maritime) • Trade and transport connectivity (production and distribution network, value chains etc.) • Energy connectivity • Significance of population dynamics • Nurturing of knowledge-based society • ICT advancements (digital connectivity) • People-to-people exchanges
  14. 14. Opportunities for Bangladesh  After full improvement of transport connectivity between South and Southeast Asia [Source: ADB] : • Real income growth 6.9% of the GDP • Export growth 86% • Annual income from duty free trade with Myanmar and India US$ 390-688 million  Connectivity with Myanmar (shipping and road) will enhance bilateral trade from US$100 million to US$ 500 million (target US$1 billion by 2020]
  15. 15. Challenges  Financial Assistance • Bangladesh needs US$ 14.27 billion to upgrade roads, rail networks, ports and energy infrastructure for economic integration. • ADB – US$505 million, WB-US$ 1 billion, Others-US$ 5.9 billion [2016-18] for infrastructure projects.  Technical Assistance  Security • BIMSTEC initiative [CTTC- CFT, Intelligence Sharing, LLEI, Narcotic Drugs- Human Trafficking, Counter Radicalization, NSA Forum]  Renewed Political Commitment • BIMSTEC initiative [Goa Summit]
  16. 16. BIMSTEC Transport Infrastructure and Logistics Study (BTILS) First raised at the 51st BWG Meeting in Bangkok, in July 2005. BTILS was agreed and commissioned in February 2007, Commencement in April 2007. Study was completed in November 2007 and 12th BIMSTEC Ministerial Meeting in December 2009 endorsed the Final Report and its recommendations. The BWG in 2011 requested ADB to conduct an update and enhancement of the BTILS since there had been significant changes (2007-2011) ADB submitted the Draft Report on “Updating and Enhancement of the BIMSTEC Infrastructure and Logistics Study” in July 2014 reflecting those changes and extending the planning timeframe forward to 2020.
  17. 17. Sectors Identified by the BTILS  The first BTILS report proposed to constitute the following five Expert Groups to coordinate, monitor and review the progress of implementation of projects: • Road development • Railways • Maritime transport • Aviation & • Trade facilitation and Logistics
  18. 18. Outcome of the updated BTILS Report  Finalized Policies and Strategies for BTILS  Prepared a Long List of projects (165) in the area of connectivity including a short list (66) of priority projects  Finalized Monitoring and Follow up mechanism for implementation of projects  Finalized Institutional Mechanism for monitoring  Proposed Work Plan for 2014-20
  19. 19. Recommended BTILS Policies and Strategies 2014-20  Recommended Road Policies: • Upgrading of border roads • Upgrading of port access roads • Enhancement of arterial links to borders and ports • Coordination of road programmes
  20. 20. Recommended BTILS Policies and Strategies 2014-20/Contd.  Recommended Road Transport Policies: • Lack of through-transport  Recommended Rail Policies: • Rail connectivity to landlocked countries • Enhanced rail connectivity between ports and their hinterland.
  21. 21. Recommended BTILS Policies and Strategies 2014-20/Contd.  Recommended Maritime Policies: • Development of deeper water ports • Container handling at BoB ports  Inland waterways policies  Aviation Policies: • Expansion of Airport Capacity • Development of freight service and facilities • Development of support facilities for LCC operations
  22. 22. Recommended BTILS Policies and Strategies 2014-20/Contd.  Trade facilitation policies: • Development of border infrastructure • Construction of ICDs • Simplification and harmonization of import/export documentation • Further development of automated systems
  23. 23. ‘Soft’ infrastructure  The number of ‘soft’ or non-physical structure projects has increased in the enhanced BTILS list of projects (trade and transport facilitation).  The priority BIMSTEC soft infrastructure projects are related to the following issues: • Increased automation in customs through system upgrades. • Reductions in trade documentation • Training of border personnel • Development of national single windows • Transport planning in Myanmar • Port and road planning in Bangladesh
  24. 24. Shortlisted Projects under BTILS Member Road Rail Maritime Aviation TF Bangladesh 06 05 01 02 02 Bhutan 01 - 01 02 India 11 01 03 01 01 Myanmar 06 - 01 01 01 Nepal 03 01 - 01 - Sri Lanka 02 - 02 01 - Thailand 03 01 03 01 -
  25. 25. BTILS Long List Member Road Rail Maritime Aviation TF Inland Water Bangladesh 18 16 05 05 03 - Bhutan 04 - - 02 02 - India 16 07 06 02 02 01 Myanmar 10 03 03 04 03 02 Nepal 12 01 0 03 01 - Sri Lanka 06 04 04 03 02 - Thailand 05 03 04 02 - -
  26. 26. BTILS Shortlisted Projects for Bangladesh  Road: 06 Projects • 4-laning Daudkandi–Chittagong highway (2014–2015) • Construction of second Katchpur, Megna, Gomti bridges (2014–2018) • 4-laning Benapole to Jessore (2016–2020) • 4-laning Jessore to Magura to Daulatdia (2016–2020) • Construction of the Padma bridge (2015–2020) • 4-laning Paturia to Nabinagar (2016–2020)
  27. 27. Shortlisted Projects: BD/Contd.  Rail: 05 Projects • Tongi–Bhairab Bazaar extra tracking (2014–2015) • 2nd bridges at Bhairab Bazaar and Titas (2014–2016) • 2 more lines Dhaka-Tongi & Tongi–Joydevpur (2014– 2015) • Double tracking Laksham–Akhaura link (2016–2019) • Bridge parallel to Bangabandhu Bridge (2016–2020)
  28. 28. Shortlisted Projects: BD/Contd.  Maritime: 01 Project • Karnafully Container Terminal at Chittagong 2014–2016  Aviation: 02 Projects • Upgrading of runway at Dhaka Airport 2015–2018 • Improvement of parking aprons at Dhaka Airport 2014  Trade Facilitation: 02 Projects • Second rail-connected ICD in Dhaka 2015–2018 • Developments at Benapole and Burimari 2014–2017
  29. 29. Digital Connectivity  Higher rate and poor quality of international calls  Higher cost of data usage  Bilaterally Bhutan, India, Myanmar and Nepal are engaged with Bangladesh for submarine cable connectivity from Cox’s Bazar terminal  Needs cross-border internet links through installing optical fibre along with the regional and national highways and rail tracks
  30. 30. Energy Connectivity in BIMSTEC Thailand Bay of Bengal POWER•BIMSTEC Energy Centre in Bangaluru •Renewable and clean energy on high demand
  31. 31. Energy Cooperation  MoU on BIMSTEC Grid-interconnection  Task Force on Trans-Power Exchange and Master Plan Study after signing of MoU  Import-export of natural gas among the member states (frozen)  Explore cooperation in hydropower & renewable energy  Energy Minister’s Meeting  BIMSTEC Energy Centre in Bengaluru, India
  32. 32.  Member States submitted their comments on the Draft Final Report of the BTILS and Draft ToR.  The implementation of the recommendations of the Study was discussed at the Inception Meeting of the BTCWG, held in Bangkok (30-31 Aug, 2016).  BTCWG finalized the ToR, adopted proposed Work Plan, Implementation Measures and Monitoring Framework. Inception Meeting of the BTCWG
  33. 33. Leaders’ Retreat, India, 2016 Outcome Document (14 areas) Agenda of Action (16 points)
  34. 34. Retreat Outcome Document “Being convinced that the development of connectivity in various forms and manifestations is the key to promote regional integration, we express satisfaction at the continuing efforts and initiatives to advance multi-modal physical connectivity (air, rail, roads and waterways) in the BIMSTEC region. We note with satisfaction the progress achieved in implementation of the recommendations of the BIMSTEC Transport Infrastructure and Logistics Study. We agree to explore the possibility of having a BIMSTEC Motor Vehicle Agreement.”
  35. 35. Leaders’ Agenda of Action • Transport and Communication i. Coastal Shipping Agreement ii. Greater physical and economic connectivity iii. Master plan for BIMSTEC Connectivity iv. Economical, Technical and Infrastructure Cooperation
  36. 36. Leaders’ Agenda of Action/Contd. • Trade and Investment i. BIMSTEC Framework Agreement on Transit, Transshipment and movement of Vehicular Traffic ii. BIMSTEC Trade Facilitation Agreement iii. Fast track BIMSTEC FTA negotiations iv. Discuss BIMSTEC Mutual Assistance on Customs Matters
  37. 37. Key BIMSTEC Trade Routes In the context of surface transport, there are 3 dominant existing/potential BIMSTEC trade routes:  Route 1: Kolkata – Siliguri – Guwahati – Imphal - Moreh/Tamu – Mandalay – Bago - Myawaddy/Mae Sot – Tak – Bangkok - Laem Chabang;  Route 2: Kolkata - Petrapole/Benapole – Jessore - Dhaka - Chittagong; and  Route 3: Kolkata – Raxaul/Birgunj - Kathmandu
  38. 38. BIMSTEC Trade Routes
  39. 39. The way forward  Trade facilitation  Explore new source of financing  BIMSTEC-MVA  Enhanced Rail Connectivity  Coastal Shipping Agreement  P2P Contact (Visa, Airfare and Foreign Exchange)  Outward Foreign Direct Investment (OFDI)  BIMSTEC-FTA  Enhanced Institutional Connectivity
  40. 40. Thank You

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