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C0.3: Blue Planet Overview - Sophie Seeyave

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C0.3: Blue Planet Overview - Sophie Seeyave

  1. 1. Oceans and Society: Blue Planet The Marine Task within GEO www. oceansandsociety.org Dr. Sophie Seeyave Executive Director, Partnership for Observation of the Global Oceans On behalf of the Blue Planet Steering Committee
  2. 2. Figure courtesy GEO Secretariat
  3. 3. Blue Planet Mission To raise public awareness of the role of the oceans in the Earth system, of their impacts (good and bad) on humankind, and of the societal benefits of ocean observations; To coordinate the various marine initiatives within GEO and develop synergies between them; and To advocate and advance the establishment and maintenance of a global observing network for the oceans.
  4. 4. Seeking integration in a complex and crowded scene AtlantOS Coastal Zone Community of Practice IOC/UNESCO JCOMM IODE OBIS DBCP SOT GLOSS Argo OceanSITES IOCCP GEOHAB GEOWOW GEO Integrated Water Information Task IV-TT OSE-TT COSS-TT MEP-TTSAFARI Capacity Building IQOE GACS Antares ChloroGIN IOCCG GCOS GCZIS CLRCoP GHRSST Virtual Constellations Carbon Task Force WGClimate PIRATA RAMATAO
  5. 5. Building on Existing Efforts • Blue Planet builds on existing programmes and coordinating mechanisms addressing ocean observations and their societal applications. • Blue Planet adds value by: – providing additional exposure and visibility to these programmes – identifying synergies between programmes, both within Blue Planet and with related activities across the GEO community and beyond – linking data to products to information to knowledge – demonstrating societal benefits – where possible making a concerted effort to link to relevant policies and policy frameworks.
  6. 6. Developing capacity and societal awareness Sustained ocean observations Datacollection Data/info management Models Data products and services Societal applications Sustain- able fisheries Ocean forecasting Tsunami warning Flood forecasts Sea level forecasts Oil spill response HAB monitoring Biodiversity monitoring Pollution monitoring Societal benefits Improved human health and safety, Sustainably managed coastal zones, Climate change adaptation/mitigation, Climate forecasts Search and rescue Improved ecosystem services and food security
  7. 7. Blue Planet Structure & Partners Sustained Ocean Observations C1 Developing Capacity & Societal Awareness C6 Ocean Forecasting & Services C3 Ocean Climate & Carbon C5 Sustained Ecosystems & Food Security C2 Services for the Coastal Zone C4
  8. 8. Sustained Ocean Observations • Sustained ocean observations are a core infrastructure to generate scientific and societal value • Strategic planning and evaluation of the system of sustained ocean observations require dialogue with users and information providers GOAL: to deliver a sustained ocean observing system meeting societal and scientific needs for data and information C1
  9. 9. C1: Building from existing in situ and satellite observations continuous satellite measurements of sea surface temperature, height, winds, ocean color, and sea ice Total in situ networks 67% Dec 2014 Surface measurements from volunteer ships (VOS) Global drifting surface buoy array Tide gauge network (GLOSS committed) XBT sub-surface temperature section network Argo profiling float network Repeat hydrography and carbon inventory 100% 250 ships in VOSclim pilot project 5° resolutionarray: 1250 floats 100% 40% 39% 100% 62% 300 real-time reporting gauges 37000 XBTs deployed 3° resolutionarray: 3200 floats Full ocean survey in 10 years Global tropical moored buoy network 76% 125 moorings planned87 combined sites Global time series network66% 30 34 40 45 48 55 56 59 60 62 62 62 62 62% 2000 2001 2002 20132003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Representative Milestones Original goal for full implementation by 2010 System % sustained, of initial goals 100% ice buoys Fast data Slow/no data GPS (Planned) 63% 2014
  10. 10. Sustained ecosystems & food Security • Chlorophyll Globally Integrated Network (ChloroGIN) and Antares • Societal Applications in Fisheries and Aquaculture of Remotely- sensed Imagery (SAFARI) • Global Alliance of Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Surveys • International Quiet Ocean Experiment (IQOE) • Mangrove monitoring • Coral Reef Monitoring (GCRMN, I-CREOS) • Estuary monitoring (Our Global Estuary) GOAL: to provide sustained, integrated and globally-complete observations of the ocean ecosystem for use by the scientific community and by the decision makers responsible for ocean stewardship. C2
  11. 11. Example: SAFARI
  12. 12. Ocean forecasting & services • Support the GODAE OceanView international programme for the consolidation and improvement of global and regional ocean forecasting systems • Build upon forecasting systems, information and services developed in the framework of the Copernicus Marine Env Monitoring Service (CMEMS) -MyOcean • Establish a global operational oceanography network, connecting advanced operational forecasting centres in developed countries and quasi-operational centers in Asia, Africa and Latin America • Enhance communication and collaboration among national ocean forecasting systems to foster exchange of knowledge and expertise. • Promote operational ocean forecasting services for societal benefit such as weather forecasting, climate change detection and its coastal impacts, search and rescue, oil spill response. GOAL: to raise capability of ocean forecasting and analysis in support of societally-relevant services. C3
  13. 13. Services for the coastal zone GOAL: to improve access to environmental intelligence for all stakeholders, and to support deliberations on coastal zone management as well as decision making related to sustainable development. - C4 is heavily focused on user information needs and observation requirements - Expected outcomes include identification of sub-sets of essential variables; specifically for sea level and water quality - Expected to result in several demonstrators - Working to provide in-kind support from NOAA to facilitate some of these activities. C4
  14. 14. Activity 1: Develop a global coastal zone information system: a global cyber- infrastructure providing access to information on coastal zones and collection of new information through crowd-sourcing and citizen-science. Activity 2: Implement a pilot project in an area-at-risk to demonstrate the added-value of ecosystem-based approaches for monitoring and managing the coastal zone. This will be coordinated with GOOS Regional Associations and global/regional networks (see PICO Plan). Activity 3: Assess climate change impacts on island coasts from the Caribbean to the Arctic using SAR data as a demonstrator for the use of space-based observations in the monitoring of climate change impacts (link to CEOS). Activity 4: Assess the observational requirements for decadal forecasts of coastal local sea-level variation and develop a demonstrator forecasting service. Activity 5: Assess user needs and observational requirements for coastal water quality (using the GEOSS User Requirements Registry); identify indicators and best practices, and implement a monitoring service pilot for coastal water quality; disseminate information particularly to under-served communities). Proposed activities
  15. 15. Ocean Climate and Carbon Observations (from space and in-situ) for both climate and carbon should be based on concrete requirements, i.e. - Climate: GCOS ECVs (+ EOVs) for climate - Carbon: GEO Carbon Strategy Report + CEOS Strategy for Carbon Observations from Space; GOOS-Biogeochemistry EOVs. Many efforts to build on these requirements, coordinated by CEOS, JCOMM, OOPC, IOCCP… Ocean acidification networks: GOA-ON, OA-ICC (IAEA), national OA programmes… Where possible making a concerted effort to link to relevant policies and policy frameworks (e.g. UNFCCC). Goal: to advance the development and implementation of the ocean contributions to the observation systems for both Climate and Carbon, and in particular to address the issues and synergies across the climate-carbon interface for the marine environment. C5
  16. 16. C6: Developing Capacity and Societal Awareness Participating Organisations: Capacity Building: • Partnership for Observation of the Global Oceans (POGO) • International Ocean Data and Information Exchange (IODE) • Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) Societal awareness: POGO –links with Ocean Communicators United, Trans- Atlantic Ocean Literacy, EMSEA, NMEA… GOAL: to maintain, develop and expand capacity-building in the field of ocean observations, and to inform and involve citizens in ocean observations using innovative approaches.
  17. 17. Capacity building in marine science, ocean observations and data management Number of trainees: >700 by POGO, >1300 by IODE, >2000 by SCOR Number of countries: 72 for POGO, 120 for IODE
  18. 18. Key Milestones & future plans Website launched White Paper Book published www.oceansandsociety.org http://www.cambridgescholars.com/ oceans-and-society 2011 2012 2013 2014 2016 Kick-Off Symposium in Brazil 1st Steering Committee Meeting 2nd Symposium in AustraliaPOGO submits Task proposal to GEO for 2012-2015 Work Plan 2015 3rd Symposium in USA Blue Planet Task SB-01 accepted by GEO Plenary and incorporated into 2012-2015 Work Plan Post-2015 GEO Work Program GEO Ministerial in Mexico
  19. 19. Desired discussions/outcomes from Symposium • Where should Blue Planet sit in the new GEO Work Programme? • Inclusive versus focussed? • Does Blue Planet need an Implementation Plan? • Should the Blue Planet Mission be updated, in particular to include stronger emphasis on user engagement? • Input to Ministerial Declaration? • Better articulation of the value of Blue Planet • Sustainability of best-effort organisation? • Exploring synergies • Policy linkages (e.g. UNFCCC, SDG, MSFD…)
  20. 20. info@oceansandsociety.org @GEOBluePlanet POGO Secretariat Plymouth Marine Laboratory Prospect Place, Plymouth PL1 3DH, UK ssve@pml.ac.uk www.oceansandsociety.org Credit: ESA

Notas del editor

  • For its first ten-year implementation plan GEO focussed on 9 societal benefit areas impacted/supported by Earth obs. Historically the ocean domain was much less visible than land and atmosphere, despite the fact that Oceans affect all the societal benefit areas of GEO
  • Against this backdrop, Oceans and Society Blue Planet was created by POGO in partnership with GOOS, GODAE OceanView and CEOS, to achieve the following mission.
  • There is a vast and growing network of existing observing system elements and programmes, governance bodies and data management systems, which are shown here in the outer ring (this is just a subset). This proliferation of acronyms, fondly known as the “Acronym Soup”, is creating confusion within the scientific community and especially outside of it. The role of BP is to facilitate communication between these programmes, most of which are connected in some way to the 5 main organisations leading Blue Planet. The ultimate goal is to integrate and explore synergies. Blue Planet does not seek to duplicate or compete with work that is already being done. Rather it seeks to raise the visibility of existing programmes and add value to them.
  • This shows how capacity building and societal awareness are the foundations on which sustained ocean obs can be implemented globally. Data collection and analysis, data and info management and models provide products and services (such as forecasts) and for a variety of societal applications that ultimately result in societal benefits
  • The Blue Planet is currently structured around these 6 Components, which are being led by the organisations shown here.
  • The component C1 builds on a wide range of contributions to a Global Ocean Observing System, including in situ observing networks and satellite virtual constellations. To date these have largely focused on ocean physical and some biogeochemical variables, but there are great opportunities to expand to sustained observations of biological and ecosystems variables. GEO-related projects are improving the readiness of observing elements to contribute to sustained ocean observing data streams.

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