Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Se está descargando tu SlideShare. ×

The role of Psychological Safety & Mission Critical Behaviours for organizational success

Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Próximo SlideShare
PACE Summary
PACE Summary
Cargando en…3
×

Eche un vistazo a continuación

1 de 50 Anuncio

The role of Psychological Safety & Mission Critical Behaviours for organizational success

Descargar para leer sin conexión

A presentation held together with AI Sweden. Focusing on the importance of psychological safety, clear goals and mission critical behaviours to build functioning organizations where individuals can come to their full potential.

A presentation held together with AI Sweden. Focusing on the importance of psychological safety, clear goals and mission critical behaviours to build functioning organizations where individuals can come to their full potential.

Anuncio
Anuncio

Más Contenido Relacionado

Similares a The role of Psychological Safety & Mission Critical Behaviours for organizational success (20)

Más reciente (20)

Anuncio

The role of Psychological Safety & Mission Critical Behaviours for organizational success

  1. 1. The role of Psychological Safety & Mission Critical Behaviours for organizational success
  2. 2. Growth almost always comes at the expense of speed, innovation, efficiency, and ultimately sleep quality for CEOs
  3. 3. Humans have their limitations
  4. 4. Identity craving herd animal Acts to safeguard role in group
  5. 5. Identity craving herd animal Acts to safeguard role in group
  6. 6. Identity craving herd animal Acts to safeguard role in group
  7. 7. Unique insights Restricted to “titles" VS
  8. 8. 100 terraflops 100 terraflops Speech ~ 36 bit/s We transfer information through all our senses, but not very efficient And the transfer loss is replaced in by our mirror neurons (worry, stress, etc)
  9. 9. 100 terraflops X cubits Speech ~ 36 bit/s
  10. 10. Ever changing problem solver Identity craving herd animal Acts to safeguard role in group Acts to safeguard role in group How do we evolve?
  11. 11. Psychological Safety “Psychological Safety” is a term that has increased in focus over the last two decades within the research field of organizational behaviour. The term psychological safety was coined by Harvard Business School professor Amy Edmondson. She defines it as “a shared belief that the team is safe for interpersonal risk-taking.” Establishing a climate of psychological safety allows space for people to speak up and share their ideas. The Canucci team extended its advisory board to a discussion with Amy Edmondson during the course of the the Forward Together initiative to include her professional expertise and input in the analysis and summaries. The right screenshot of a recent article by Amy is clickable.
  12. 12. Psychological Safety In businesses large and small; in government agencies, schools, and hospitals; in for-profits and nonprofits, and in any country in the world, most people are spending time and energy covering up their weaknesses, managing other people’s impressions of them, showing themselves to their best advantage, playing politics, hiding their inadequacies, hiding their uncertainties, hiding their limitations. Hiding. It’s the single most significant loss of resources that organizations suffer every day. Is anything more valuable to a company than the way its people spend their energies? The total cost of this waste is simple to state and staggering to contemplate: it prevents organizations, and the people who work in them, from reaching their full potential. Increases in profitability, improved employee retention, greater speed to promotability, greater frankness in communication, better error detection in operational and strategic design, more effective delegation and enhanced accountability.” Alongside Amy, her colleague Robert Keegan is one of the foremost leader on organizational behaviour in the world. He states that psychological safety is the single most significant value contributor for organizations. “In an ordinary organization, most people are doing a second job no one is paying them for.  
  13. 13. Psychological safety correlates with clarity/bullshit Katarina Gospic, hjärnforskare
  14. 14. Adult development & mental complexity
  15. 15. The investment perspective Chamath Palihapitiya, David Sacks, David Friedberg, Peter Thiel, Andreseen Horowitz, Gil Pencina, etc
  16. 16. Success in the future will depend on efficiency and the ability to change Increases the chance for success by creating efficient growth and long term value.
  17. 17. Long term value creation Efficient growth When companies function near their full potential, when leadership, processes, responsibilities and decisions are optimized and clear, when every resource is used best and make possible an exponentially higher change pace. When the leadership, resources in a company, employees, infrastructure and assets, continuously are developed and changed, as a natural part of the company’s efficient growth.
  18. 18. Change starts with an idea. Which changes things. It needs prioritization to be realised. And hard work. But it does not stop there. To realise the true potential of an idea, a variety of things need to work together, individually and as a whole. 
 
 For an organization to function efficiently and smoothly, where people can grow, a variety of things need to work together. Change across 
 6 key areas
  19. 19. Organizational success and change is directly related to understanding how these areas relate to efficient growth and long term value creation, and a high level of organisational maturity within, and between, these areas: 01/ Leadership
 
 Founders // CEO // Management group // Board 02/ Organisation (a direct result of leadership)
 
 Organisational development // Organisational psychology // individual development // recruitment 03/ Business strategy
 
 Value proposition & Business model// sales strategy // target audiences // partners 04/ Brand strength
 
 Value creation // Packaging // Design // Messaging // Activation // PR 05/ Product & Services
 
 User experience // Customer problem // Product development // Business focus // Technology 06/ Technical infrastructure
 
 Architecture // Scalability // Speed // Longevity WHEN THESE AREAS ARE HEALTHY AND FUNCTION AT A HIGH LEVEL, THE COMPANY HAS THE CAPACITY TO GROW EFFICIENTLY, REACH ITS GOALS AND OUTPERFORM ITS COMPETITION
  20. 20. a) Leadership i) Leaders that can lead (delegate, deliver, coach, clarify responsibilities and accountability) ii) Leaders with the ability to change and adapt (high complexity of mental development)*
 b) Organisation i) Structured to mirror the organization’s business strategy
 (clear responsibilities, accountabilities, deliverables)
 c) Culture i) Organisational psychological safety - Energy spent on responsibility, not on politics - No fear to ask questions, or for help, in order to fulfil responsibilities An organization’s ability to change (innovation capacity) and pace of change (innovation speed) is a direct result of
  21. 21. Prioritize. Dare to say no. Help each other to say no. Allows me to prioritize, creates comfort, and allows me to reach results. Alignment between my own goals and job deliverables 1 Check in. Check out. Make sure that you are good. Trust others to say what they feel. Don’t project. Taking responsibility for relations. Not feelings. 2 Say no to things 4 When unsure. Ask for clarification or help. Help others ask for help. Share feelings Ask for help and help each other. Express emotions. 5 Make time in your calendar between meetings, for contemplation, focus and rest. Value yourself
 and your own time. 3 Every action or meeting must have a responsible person.
 
 That person is responsible for making sure everyone knows what needs to be done, and the expectations. Responsibility and 
 clarification of purpose 6 Important areas for psychological safety and efficiency
  22. 22. What are Mission 
 Critical Behaviours ? Key behaviours in a group or organization Behaviours that I personally can use every day, that contribute to us
 1. Reaching our goals faster 2. Wasting less energy along the way 
 (= green house gases & climate change) Behaviours that we strive to adhere to everyday That we can help each other stick to, value, repeat, and uphold.
  23. 23. Individual behaviours that I can take responsibility for doing myself, and help others practice. Not group behaviours.
  24. 24. Behaviours that we strive to adhere to everyday. That may feel “silly”.
  25. 25. Otherwise the cheese won’t caramelise! If you sell toasted cheese in your café you cut your bread <1/2” 1
  26. 26. “I’ve worked in restaurants a long time! Are you telling me how to cut bread?” Otherwise the cheese won’t caramelise! If you sell toasted cheese in your café you cut your bread <1/2” 1
  27. 27. A us-vs-them setup will decrease the odds of a sale. In customer meetings, think about how you sit around the table. 2
  28. 28. A us-vs-them setup will decrease the odds of a sale. In customer meetings, think about how you sit around the table. 2 “I’ve been a consultant for a long time. 
 I know how to sit around a table!”
  29. 29. Faster decisions when everyone are mentally present. Fewer meetings and faster results. Block time before and after meeting to prepare and process. 3
  30. 30. Faster decisions when everyone are mentally present. Fewer meetings and faster results. Block time before and after meeting to prepare and process. 3 “I don’t have time for that. I am important. 
 I might not be able to do my job if I don’t say yes to all meeting requests.”
  31. 31. 03. Daily tools Tools - things to practice Simple things that everyone can use everyday to practice said behaviour. 01. Behavior Short description of the behavior 04. Things to avoid Stuff we try to avoid Things we can help each other be on the lookout for, that have a negative impact.. 02. Anti behavior The antithesis of the behavior in question To make things more tangible, we also describe what the opposite behavior is. Each of the mission critical behaviours is presented with four different dimensions, both descriptive and tangible. The 4 descriptors for mission critical behaviours
  32. 32. 03. Daily tools • Ask: How can we do this better?
 • How is done by the best in the world? • Look at others. Get inspiration. • Call someone external and ask • Ask your colleagues • Suggest crazy bold ideas 01. Behavior There must be a better way
 04. Things to avoid • Applying old recipes to new problems. 
 • Not daring to ask - fear of getting a no
 • Keeping quiet to not seem stupid
 • Believing anything is similar to the past • Limiting your ambition • Limiting your goals to your department 02. Anti behavior That cannot be done / I know how this is done I have done this before so I will do the exact same thing again. Not listening to others who might add new perspectives and improve. An example of a mission critical behaviour.
  33. 33. 04. Daily tools • When booking a meeting, book time for prep and post processing.
 • When inviting, book longer than you need, but don’t use all the time. 01. Behavior Always block time before and after meetings. So that I can prepare, process and act on what was discussed and decided. 04. Things to avoid • Booking back to back meetings 02. Anti behavior Have back to back meetings I’m so busy, I’m in meetings all day. Not 100% focused. Working on other things in the meetings. An example of using the format 03. Example of how this makes us better • Much quicker to decisions and actions when everyone are prepared, focused and have time to process afterwards. • Fewer meetings • Quicker to finish tasks and solving problems
  34. 34. Long term value creation Efficient growth When companies function near their full potential, when leadership, processes, responsibilities and decisions are optimized and clear, when every resource is used best and make possible an exponentially higher change pace. When the leadership, resources in a company, employees, infrastructure and assets, continuously are developed and changed, as a natural part of the company’s efficient growth. Mission Critical Behaviours helps the 
 organization with
  35. 35. Utilize energy better Reaching her/his full potential When people function near their full potential, they are happier, healthier, less worried or stressed, feel better, are able to act faster, and deliver more. They spend energy on things they personally grow from, where their own goals and the goals of the organization are in alignment. Energy is spent more on forward momentum and sustainable value creation. Less on acting to mitigate fear or worries. Mission Critical Behaviours helps the 
 individual to
  36. 36. Exactly the way they were created You do not have to be something for someone else Or try to live up to what you believe your parents would approve of Your VALUE does NOT come from what you DO Because everyone has the right to exist in this universe, and on this planet.
  37. 37. Mission critical behaviours helps 
 establish psychological safety. Less feeling of stress & worry. Safe to ask for help. Ok to fail. It’s becomes 
 easier to trust each other 1 Less on politics. Less on seeking affirmation. Less on building your individual brand. More energy spent on doing what you want. 2 By knowing your role, and what you need to focus on - you can grow in the areas you want to. More personal growth. 3
  38. 38. Mission Critical Behaviours that exist in other organizations.
  39. 39. FC Barcelona Triangle passing; I always move, always pass
  40. 40. Zappos I help even when it “isn’t my job” (because it adds tangible value to our company culture and brand)
  41. 41. SpaceX The ASS rule Acronyms seriously sucks (because not everyone understands, and are often to afraid to look dumb by asking)
  42. 42. Tesla If you feel you’re not adding value to a meeting, leave.
  43. 43. Navy Seals Believe in the mission (Making sure I, and everyone else, truly understands the mission)
  44. 44. 01. Behavior Focus on the created value of an activity. So that we can prioritize, make decisions and move faster towards value creation. 02. Anti behavior The activity is perceived as a goal in itself. We had a meeting. Great. Well done. We had an event. Great. Well done. 01. Behavior Seek feedback early and often. Don’t waste unnecessary time just because it’s uncomfortable to get feedback. 02. Anti behavior Make it perfect before you show it to people. I need another week. 01. Behavior Clarify your own role in activities Make sure you know your own role in meetings or activities, and what you are expected to contribute with. 02. Anti behavior Join activities because they seem fun. This seems fun. I want to be part of this. A close look at three (3) behaviours
  45. 45. 04. Daily tools • Write down what value we intend to create. And for whom. In a short text. • Write what we want people to think, say, feel and do, as a result of this activity. • Use that text in every project document. • Start and end every meeting with repeating the goal - what value are we set on creating. • When planning activities, make time to discuss if the activity is really needed or if we can reach the goal without it. 01. Behavior Focus on the created value of an activity. So that we can prioritize, make decisions and move faster towards value creation. 05. Things to avoid • Starting activities without defining in writing what value we intend to create, and for whom. • Having meetings without repeating it. • Using fluffy generalisations or complex language when defining the value. 02. Anti behavior The activity is perceived as a goal in itself. We had a meeting. Great. Well done. We had an event. Great. Well done. 01 03. Example of how this makes us better • We specify what value we create, so that we can understand why we exist, tell our partners and financiers about it. • Everyone has an easier time to understand their role and potential action. • Quicker to finish tasks and solving problems • We can prioritize much easier.
  46. 46. 04. Daily tools • Explain why you are doing the activity before asking for feedback (the value, for whom). • Show already when you have a rough draft bullet list or synopsis. • Practice receiving feedback, and giving it. • Seek feedback in IRL sessions • Start feedback with “I feel” or “In my opinion” • Help each other remember that feedback on work has nothing to do with you as a person. • Check in after a feedback session 01. Behavior Seek feedback early and often. Don’t waste unnecessary time just because it’s uncomfortable to get feedback. 05. Things to avoid • Ask for feedback via email • Give feedback as if it was the truth (“this is…”) • Misinterpret feedback as personal critique 02. Anti behavior Make it perfect before you show it to people. I need another week. 02 03. Example of how this makes us better • If we can test ideas early and get feedback we can adjust our direction early. This helps us spend our energy more efficiently. • Practicing receiving feedback frequently makes it easier and becomes natural. • We avoid double work or conflicts. • Natural knowledge sharing.
  47. 47. 04. Daily tools • Discuss with the responsible party what is expected from you. • Clarify your role and deliverables. • If you don’t have a clear role or exceptions, suggest that you might be superfluous. • Trust others that they can do the job without you. • Help clarify goals, plans and agendas. Or request them. 01. Behavior Clarify your own role in activities Make sure you know your own role in meetings or activities, and what you are expected to contribute with. 05. Things to avoid • Join meetings or activities without knowing what’s expected from you. • Call meetings or start activities, without clarifying what’s expected from the participants. • Join meetings just to listen or feel in the loop (this can be achieved by 1-1 meetings instead) • Avoid standing meetings without goal & agenda. 02. Anti behavior Join activities because they seem fun. This seems fun. I want to be part of this. 03 03. Example of how this makes us better • If everyone has a clear role and responsibility the meeting or activity will be faster and more efficient. • We will also avoid feeling uncertain or stressed because we don’t know what our role is.
  48. 48. “On any team, in any organization, all responsibility for success and failure rests with the leader. The leader must own everything in his or her world. There is no one else to blame.”

×