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10 Creativity Teaching Tools - Charles Wood - SXSW Edu - Slideshare.pdf

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10 battle-tested creativity exercises designed to help employees, students, etc develop their creativity, innovation, and collaboration skills.
Hope you enjoy using them as much as I have. Please reach out with any questions or additional resources or ideas.

10 battle-tested creativity exercises designed to help employees, students, etc develop their creativity, innovation, and collaboration skills.
Hope you enjoy using them as much as I have. Please reach out with any questions or additional resources or ideas.

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10 Creativity Teaching Tools - Charles Wood - SXSW Edu - Slideshare.pdf

  1. 1. 10 Hands-On Tools to Boost Creativity & Projects Charles M. Wood, Ph.D. University of Tulsa
  2. 2. Why these 10 exercises? • Variety of purpose: • Warmups, set the stage and culture • Early successes • Collaboration, directed creativity, controlled chaos • Flexiblity: Can do them anywhere with anyone
  3. 3. What’s New? [warmup] • Find real, everyday examples from the world around us • (e.g., green ketchup, discontinued products) • Pass them around • Get conversations started
  4. 4. • HAPIfork • http://www.tuaw.com/2013/01/07/ces-unveiled-the-hapifork-aims-to-help-you-track-your-eating-ha/ • Water wheel (20 gallons)
  5. 5. What’s New? [warmup] • Lessons: • Creativity is the foundation • Creativity is not the same as innovation • Innovations solve problems, relieve pain, … • Also, warmups set the tone: • This is a safe, supportive environment. • We model the proper behavior, build on their responses
  6. 6. Not Bad! [warmup] • Find examples of unusual or dubious innovations • Ask: • “What is good about this?” • “Does it solve a real problem? …for many people?”
  7. 7. Not Bad! [warmup] • Lessons: • Learn to see potential in any idea • Withhold criticism • All ideas are welcome • We are builders – so give us something to build on
  8. 8. Two Buckets [early success] • Try this one! Form teams of 3-4. • Each team: randomly choose a card from each of 2 buckets • One has major brand names (e.g, Nike, Apple, Nestle). One has product categories (e.g., tools, bikes, carseats) • Combine them to make a new product. • Task: • Describe your new product’s features and benefits • Who would buy it? • Can you name your new product? • Any ad ideas?
  9. 9. (also, pick 2 numbers or roll dice) 1. NIKE 2. LEGO 3. HARLEY DAVIDSON 4. COVER GIRL 5. PORSCHE 6. COLGATE 7. APPLE 8. CENTURY 21 9. BUDWEISER 10. COCA-COLA 11. CATERPILLAR 12. U.S. GOVERNMENT 1. CRAYONS 2. CAR SEATS 3. CONCRETE 4. PHONES 5. FURNITURE 6. JEWELRY 7. BICYCLES 8. TOOTHBRUSHES 9. BACKPASKS 10.FAST FOOD 11.TOYS 12.THEME PARK
  10. 10. Two Buckets [early success] • Lesson: Combinations can be a great source of ideas
  11. 11. Innovation as Combination • Combining ideas is a key ability for innovation that can be developed. • Netflix = Book of the month club + DVD rentals • Kiva.org = Venture Capital + 3rd World Relief • Google AdWords = Ad placement + Auctions • Hunger Games = Reality show + Iraq war • Biomimicry = Nature + Technology
  12. 12. Innovation You [first projects] • Ask students: “Create a poster about YOU” • Their favorite quote • Inspirational person • What they know the most about -outside of family and school • (Gladwell’s “outliers” idea) • When, where they have experienced “Flow” • Their Jung typology • Gardner’s multiple intelligences: “How are you smart?” • A 3-D item
  13. 13. Innovation You [first projects] • Lessons: • Identifies how and where students are most likely to innovate successfully. • We are all different, and that’s good!
  14. 14. iWish [early success] • Try this one! • First, think of a problem or hassle people face often • Awkward social situations, parking tickets, bad breath, late,… • Can direct – e.g., visually impaired • Form teams, share ideas, and choose a problem that can be addressed by a new app. • “I wish a cell phone could _______.” • Grab an Expo marker, draw its screen on the iPhone whiteboard, and be ready to present
  15. 15. Make a meal from what is available in the home Get color matching tips for colorblind people What should I wear today based on weather forecast
  16. 16. iWish [early success] • Lessons: • The power of collaboration • The power of the pen • “Hey, our ideas might actually be worth something!”
  17. 17. What’s happening • Confidence is increasing • A supportive culture is building
  18. 18. Generativity Theory • “Multiple, competing repertoires are the seeds of new ideas.” • from Epstein’s book: Creativity Games for Trainers • “Combinatory play” – Einstein • “Forced association”
  19. 19. 100 uses [collaboration] • In teams, ask students to write down 100 uses for old newspapers • in 10 minutes! • Lesson: • This helps lower inhibitions for sharing ideas • Remember that feeling
  20. 20. R&D / Prototyping [collaboration] Try working the standard innovation process backwards: • Instead of starting with problems and developing many possible innovations, start with innovations and consider their application to many problems • “What else could we do with this technology?” • R&Dmag.com: Spider silk, Nanobatteries, … • Inventables.com: Rapid prototyping, MakerBots
  21. 21. www.rdmag.com Spider silk: 5x stronger than steel Ask: “What could we do with this?”
  22. 22. Get your hands on prototyping • FabLabs in major cities • Materials at (e.g.) Inventables.com
  23. 23. R&D / Prototyping [collaboration] • Lessons: • Look around for ideas and inventions • There are alternate uses for existing ideas • We can re-use existing materials too
  24. 24. Innovation Challenges [project] • A simple challenge: “ADD VALUE” • Create something new and useful – art, new product, … using: • Post-its (e.g., Stanford’s ImagineIt! program) • Pizza boxes • Old computer diskettes, CDs, parts • Social innovation challenges too • Reach out! • Invite the campus, other schools, get community judges
  25. 25. 2 entries made from unused pizza boxes
  26. 26. Biomimicry [directed creativity] • How does nature solves a problem? • Lesson: Learn from others’ successes, blend innovations
  27. 27. Resources • Biomimicry Institute: • The Biomimicry Institute — Nature-Inspired Innovation
  28. 28. Build Up [collaboration] • Put challenge questions at the top of large note cards • “How might we…” • Write an idea beneath the question, pass it to the right. • On each card, build on the ideas of others. • Last round of ideas must be “wild ideas” • The Worst Idea Ever • Write down a really bad product or service idea on large note cards, pass it to the right. • Make the idea worse, pass it on (x2) • Now, get with your team and find a nugget of a good idea in what you see; make it into a good idea. • Lesson: • When we build together, we can get better outcomes
  29. 29. Visioning [directed creativity] • Create a fictional, super positive news story about your students, school, or organization • http://www.fodey.com/generators/newspaper/snippet.a sp
  30. 30. Visioning [directed creativity] • Ask the group to offer a few ideas about what the organization must have done to deserve this recognition or win this award. • Lesson: • Sometimes a “pull” works better than a “push.”
  31. 31. Empathy [directed creativity] • Empathize first • Then discuss solutions to this group’s problems
  32. 32. The “Very Senior Games” • Empathy for the elderly
  33. 33. Client Projects [advanced] • Find worthy causes in your community • They all need help! • Another way to develop empathy in students/employees • Try the “Human-Centered Design” process used by IDEO: • Hear • Go into the environment, observe, interview => Inspiration • Create • Process the data, brainstorm solutions => Ideation • Develop • Select, prototype, rinse and repeat => Implementation
  34. 34. Students visited a local prison and produced TV PSAs calling for action on the issue of Oklahoma’s high rate of female incarceration Girl Scout meeting with inmates / daughters at Eddie Warrior Correctional Facility
  35. 35. • Bergan pet products • Student project
  36. 36. • Other student ideas for a pet products manufacturer Students visited a local prison and produced TV PSAs calling for action on the issue of Oklahoma’s high rate of female incarceration
  37. 37. Places and programs • A “place” • Consider IDEO, Google, … => We proposed “Studio Blue” • A program • Nova Fellowship • Students from all majors collaborating to innovate and implement for their favorite community causes
  38. 38. "Most of the really great breakthroughs in science are unifications.” - Owen J. Gingerich, science historian at Harvard http://www.novafellowship.org/ (1-minute video) The Nova Fellowship
  39. 39. Resources and Credits: • Get the basic Jung profiles (free) at: www.humanmetrics.com • Robert Epstein, Creativity Games for Trainers • www.RDmag.com • www.Inventables.com , http://www.instamorph.com/ • https://biomimicry.org/biomimicry-examples/ • www.fodey.com/generators/newspaper/snippet.asp At the University of Tulsa: • https://business.utulsa.edu/studio-blue/ • www.novafellowship.org Questions? Please email me at: charles-wood@utulsa.edu

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