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Diversion First: Diversion-Oriented System of Care Stakeholders Update: Oct. 17, 2016

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Diversion First: Diversion-Oriented System of Care Stakeholders Update: Oct. 17, 2016

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Diversion First: Diversion-Oriented System of Care Stakeholders Update: Oct. 17, 2016

  1. 1. Diversion-Oriented System of Care Stakeholders Update October 17, 2016
  2. 2. Tonight’s Agenda • Good News Announcements • Data & Evaluation Team + Workforce Development • Court Services Launch • Updates from the CSB • Communications Team • Leadership Group • Expanding focus in 2017 • Public Comment • Other announcements and discussion 2
  3. 3. New Initiative Participation The Honorable Sharon Bulova Chairman, Fairfax County Board of Supervisors 3
  4. 4. White House Data Justice Initiative • Fairfax County signed on to this initiative! – One of three localities in Virginia – 120 total in USA – Announced nationally on October 13 – This initiative will provide ongoing technical assistance to our diversion efforts 4
  5. 5. 5 White House Data-Driven Justice Initiative
  6. 6. Recognition Tisha Deeghan Executive Director Fairfax-Falls Church CSB 6
  7. 7. Gary Ambrose: Winner Winner! Gary Ambrose, 2016 Joseph V. Gartlan Award for Leadership and Advocacy recipient from the Virginia Association of VACSBs • Chairman, Fairfax-Falls Church CSB • Chair, Diversion First Stakeholders Group • Active member of NAMI of Northern Virginia and Concerned Fairfax • And many, many more areas of involvement! 7
  8. 8. Data and Evaluation Work Team 2nd Lt. Myrna Kinney, Sheriff’s Office Lt. Ryan Morgan, Police Department Lisa Potter, Community Services Board Deputy Chief Jason Jenkins, Fire and Rescue
  9. 9. Diverted from Potential Arrest Instances in which law enforcement officers diverted individuals from arrest and provided an opportunity for mental health services In the first nine months (Jan. 2016-Sept. 2016): • 1,164 people were transported by law enforcement to Merrifield Crisis Response Center. • 294 or 25% had potential criminal charges but were diverted to mental health services. • Includes both voluntary and ECO • Working on a process to quantify broader diversion rate and include those arrested in the community • On average, 35% of all LEO transports to the MCRC involved a CIT trained officer 9
  10. 10. Data Snapshot 10 Jan-Mar., 2016 April-June, 2016 July-Sept, 2016 TOTAL Jan-Sept, 2016 Police Department Mental health investigations in the field – Fairfax County Police Dept. 831 916 900 2,647 - Resolved in the field (Fairfax County)1 471 505 479 1,455 - Involved Merrifield Crisis Response Center (MCRC) for all jurisdictions2 360 411 393 1,164 Merrifield Crisis Response Center/Emergency Services Total service encounters 1,296 1,380 1,170 3,846 – General Emergency Services (non-law enforcement involved) 936 969 777 2,682 – Involved Law Enforcement 360 411 393 1,164 - Voluntary transports to MCRC 158 141 127 426 - Emergency Custody Order (ECO) transports to MCRC 202 270 266 738 Diverted from potential arrest 103 106 85 294 Unduplicated number of people served at Emergency Services 1,742 Mobile Crisis Unit3 – Total number of services (attempts and contacts) 319 361 415 1,095 - Total number of services (contacts) 215 242 294 751 – Services with law enforcement involvement or referral 79 126 148 353 Unduplicated number of people served (contacts) 408 Office of the Sheriff – Temporary Detention Orders (TDOs) from Jail 3 13 9 25 – Transports from MCRC to out of region MH hospitals 26 37 28 91 – Jail transfers to Western State Hospital (forensic) 5 2 6 13 1 Officer dispatched and provided a services; no further action required 2 Jurisdictions include (Cities of Fairfax & Falls Church, Towns of Herndon & Vienna, George Mason University, Northern Virginia Community College, Virginia State Police) 3 One Mobile Crisis Unit until Sept. 2016
  11. 11. 126% increase in ECOs from 2015-2016 11 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 1st Q 2nd Q 3rd Q Total 74 126 126 326 202 270 266 738 ECO 2015 - 2016 Comparison 2015 2016
  12. 12. MCRC- ECO Exchange of Custody 12
  13. 13. Crisis Intervention Team Training and Mental Health First Aid Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Training • Graduates since September, 2015 – 217 total (18% of patrol offices trained • Dispatcher training - 38 trained • Coordinating additional classes Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) Trained to date: • Deputies – 211 (approx. 50%) • Magistrates – 30 (100%) • Juvenile Intake Officers – 23 (100%) • Fire and Rescue- adaptation of MHFA curriculum (120 trained to date) 13
  14. 14. Sheriff’s Office Data Jan-Sept. 2016 • Temporary Detention Orders (TDOs) from jail- 25 • Includes those with mental health issues who would be better served in a psychiatric hospital • Transports from MCRC to out of region psychiatric hospitals- 91 • Transport requires 2 deputies, at least one CIT-trained • Jail transfers to Western State Hospital (forensic)- 13 • Individuals taken to jail (not bonded out) but need hospitalization due to decompensation 14
  15. 15. Sheriff’s Office • Analyzing data to determine prevalence rates for serious mental illness – Benchmarking national rates – Determine change in these rates over time • Reviewing data on individuals with serious mental illness who are incarcerated to identify demographics, recidivism, charges, and treatment linkage 15
  16. 16. Progress and Next Steps • Conducted research for program evaluation data measures and benchmarking with diversion programs nationally • Mapped process flow and data variables for jail, magistrates and court services- other intercepts/intervention points will be mapped next 16
  17. 17. Progress and Next Steps • DIT and third-party evaluator actively involved with data and evaluation efforts; CSB position to manage and analyze data and evaluate diversion efforts coming soon • Team is participating in White House Data-Driven Justice Initiative • Planning a pilot to develop the framework for cross system long-term outcomes 17
  18. 18. General District Court The Honorable Michael Cassidy, Chief Judge Rusty Hefner, Court Services Gene Whitlock, Court Services 18
  19. 19. Research Early Identification and Intervention • Local jurisdictions and courts in Pennsylvania, Maryland and The District of Columbia • National Institute of Justice • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) • Fairfax Community Services Board Only in Pre-Trial services, can Court Services impact all of the courts and allow for early interception. PRE-TRIAL SERVICES Court Services
  20. 20. 20 Work Group Goals (launched in March) • Implement Diversion First Initiative at the Pre-Trial Stage • Adapting our Pre-Trial program to meet the court’s needs. • Utilize existing staff resources within Court Services’ Pre-Trial Evaluation Unit • Work within the framework of existing workflow and timelines
  21. 21. Court Services Pre-Trial Evaluation Unit • A single Probation Officer I is on staff 140 hours of a 168 hour work week. • Evaluations are conducted on all qualified defendants held in the jail. • Evaluation interviews last 30 to 60 minutes depending on the defendant’s location within the jail. • A typical interview consists of approximately 63 questions encompassing basic demographics, employment, references, drug history, and criminal history. • Risk Assessment – 40 questions • Substance Abuse Assessment – 17 questions • Financial Eligibility – 20 questions • Additional Evaluations:
  22. 22. Initial Mental Health Screening A simple screening instrument will be administered to:  Every defendant completing a jail evaluation.  Every defendant placed into Pre-Trial Supervision that has not previously completed a screening The Brief Jail Mental Health Screen (BJMHS) • An elementary instrument, deployable at the initial intake. • Designed for use by staff with little to no mental health training. • Eight (8) Questions for use on male and female defendants. • Less than 3 minutes to administer and score. • Validated in a study of 10,330 inmates at 4 jails in NY and MD.
  23. 23. BJMHS Magistrate – Initial Judicial Review General District Court General District Court J&DR District Court Circuit Court - Advisement Hearing - Bond Motion - Bond Appeals A RECOMMENDATION WILL BE MADE FOR PLACEMENT INTO THE SUPERVISED RELEASE PROGRAM (SRP) WHERE THEY WILL BE SUPERVISED BY COURT SERVICES AND CONNECTED WITH MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES. Jail Evaluators Defense Counsel Commonwealth Attorney The Flow
  24. 24. The Next Step: Advanced Screening Administered to defendants placed into SRP who:  Have Mental Health ordered as a special condition of release.  Have scored a need for further assessment on the simple Screening.  Administered at intake by a Probation Officer II with mental health training and training on the administration of the advance screening.  15 to 20 minute administration.  A qualifying score on the instrument would indicate the need for a mental health assessment. Jackson Mental Health Form III Modified Mini Screen
  25. 25. CSB- Mental Health Assessments All cases placed on SRP with a special condition for mental health treatment will be referred to the CSB, or to their pre-existing treatment provider. and All SRP cases where advanced screening indicates a need for a mental health assessment will be referred to the CSB. Ideally, within 48 hours of release, an SRP referred defendant will have been screened, referred, and scheduled for an assessment or ordered treatment.
  26. 26. Initial Screening Pilot Data July to present – 59% reported a previous mental health diagnosis – 42% were County Residents, 30% were Virginia(non-county) residents – 22% were placed in the Supervised Release Program  Of 3000+ arrestees, 900 defendants were eligible for interview by Court Services staff and administered the BJMHS.  300 (33%) of the defendants screened were identified by the BJMHS to need further assessment.
  27. 27. Goals  Evaluations for appropriate treatment can be initiated early and monitored with community based supervision, leading to informed disposition of criminal cases.  Costs of incarceration and services can be mitigated by early intervention.  Identify defendants in need of mental health intervention.  Through simple and advanced screening administered early after arrest  With Pre-trial supervision submitting status reports to the court, CA & DA  Allow Seamless transition from Pre-trial to Probation supervision  Same specialized Probation Officer and setting
  28. 28.  Stronger collaboration and alignment with CSB to improve response time for mental health and substance abuse assessments.  Consideration of immediate CSB assessment (skipping CSB screening) of all Court screened referrals and improved communication.  Improved data sharing to enhance/target court and CSB service delivery.  Strengthening/Building of private provider pool to provide services to defendants assessed ineligible for CSB services.  Consideration for additional suicidality screening. Planning for the Future
  29. 29. CSB Updates Daryl Washington CSB Deputy Director 29
  30. 30. CSB Updates • Key positions hired • Additional position hiring processes • Permanent Supportive Housing Funds 30
  31. 31. Communications and Public Outreach Team Presented by: Rhiannon Duck, Supervisor Cook’s Office Lindsey Doane, Chairman Bulova’s Office
  32. 32. Public Outreach • Presentations scheduled for local groups that may be interested in Diversion First – Presented to Arc of Northern Virginia staff in Aug. – Upcoming presentations scheduled: • Arc of Northern Virginia member parents (Oct.) • MVLE (Nov.) • LTCCC (Nov.) • Little River United Church of Christ (Jan. 2017) • Considering community presentations open to all • Interested groups may email diversionfirst@fairfaxcounty.gov 32
  33. 33. Website • Work continues on website, with news and information added as needed • New data page added • FAQ page in progress 33
  34. 34. Outreach Materials • One-page info sheet developed • Video outlining how to request a CIT-Trained first responder scheduled 34
  35. 35. Moving Forward • Small communications team workgroups focusing on specific areas: – Outreach and Presentations – Website Updates and Maintenance – Hotline Consolidation and Education – Internal Communications and Wordsmithing 35
  36. 36. Leadership Group Dave Rohrer Deputy County Executive 36
  37. 37. Leadership Group • Development of problem-solving team – Core members – Ad hoc members – Method for public to reach out to this group will become available through website later this year • Budget • Ongoing regular meetings and commitment 37
  38. 38. Coming in 2017: Continue with intercept 1 with focus on Expanding to Intercepts 2 and 3 38 Intercept 2- Initial detention and court involvement Intercept 3- Courts and jail Sequential Intercept Model
  39. 39. Public Comment 39
  40. 40. Other updates, announcements, discussion 40
  41. 41. Next Stakeholders Meeting January 19, 7-9 p.m. Reviewing our first year progress and previewing Year 2 priorities Government Center Rooms 9 & 10 41

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