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Leveraging Agile Project Management with Scrum

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Leveraging Agile Project Management with Scrum

  1. 1. Leveraging AGILE Project Management with SCRUM IImage: hdwallpapers Facilitated by Goutama Bachtiar v3.6.1 as of October 2018
  2. 2. Image: timbena
  3. 3. Workshop Agenda 3  Module 1: A Sneak-Peek on Waterfall Model  Module 2: Introduction to SCRUM Framework  Module 3: Scrum International Certifications  Module 4: Roles & Artifacts in SCRUM  Module 5: Requirements Management  Module 6: Project Estimation and Planning  Module 7: Project Execution  Module 8: Project Monitoring and Controlling October 2018Agile with Scrum
  4. 4. Workshop Agenda (cont’d) 4  Module 9: Scrum Adoption  Module 10: Key Challenges  Module 11: Key Success Factors  Module 12: Kanban and TDD Framework  Module 13: Scrum Documentation  Module 14: Scrum Tools and Software October 2018Agile with Scrum
  5. 5. 5 • Please kindly set all mobile phones etc on silent mode • Feel free to interrupt my presentation to ask questions at any time • In the end, there is a final Q&A session for deeper concerns • Time is slightly relative and I own the clock ☺ • Do actively participate! And don’t forget to have fun! October 2018 Agile with Scrum Ground Rules
  6. 6. 6 A Sneak-Peek on Waterfall Model Module 1 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  7. 7. 7 *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Process Groups and Knowledge Areas 2018 Agile & Scrum
  8. 8. 8 *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Process Groups and Knowledge Areas (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum
  9. 9. Advantages of Waterfall Model 9 1. Simple and easy to understand and use 2. Easy to manage due to rigidity of the model 3. Phases are executed and completed one at a time, no overlaps 4. Works well in cases of non- complex projects October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  10. 10. 10 1. Don’t get to see the end-product until the end of the life- cycle. 2. Challenging to trace back to earlier phases and fix issues; incurs huge cost and risk 3. Managing changing requirements during the life-cycle 4. Loaded with risk and uncertainty 5. Does not suit large/complex/integrated projects that have evolving requirements October 2018 Agile with Scrum Challenges in Waterfall Model
  11. 11. 11 No Process Input Output 1 Develop Project Charter 1. Project Statement of Work 1. Project Charter 2. Business Case 3. Agreement 4. Enterprise Environmental Factors 5. Organizational Process Assets 2 Identify Stakeholders 1. Project Charter 1. Stakeholder Register2. Procurement Documents 3. Enterprise Environmental Factors 4. Organizational Process Assets 3 Develop Project Management Plan 1. Project Charter 1. Project Management Plan 2. Outputs from other Planning Processes 3. Enterprise Environmental Factors 4. Organizational Process Assets 4 Plan Scope Management 1. Project Management Plan 1. Scope Management Plan 2. Project Charter 3. Enterprise Environmental Factors 2. Requirements Management Plan 4. Organizational Process Assets 5 Collect Requirements 1. Scope Management Plan 1. Requirements Documentations2. Requirements Management Plan 3. Stakeholder Management Plan 4. Project Charter 2. Requirements Traceability Matrix 5. Stakeholder Register 6 Define Scope 1. Scope Management Plan 1. Project Scope Statement 2. Project Charter 3. Requirements Documentation 2. Project Document Updates 4. Organizational Process Assets 7 Create WBS 1. Scope Management Plan 1. Scope Baseline 2. Project Scope Statement 3. Requirements Documentation 2. Project Document Updates4. Enterprise Environmental Factors 5. Organizational Process Assets *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Inputs/Outputs and Processes 2018 Agile & Scrum
  12. 12. 12 No Process Input Output 8 Plan Schedule Management 1. Project Management Plan 1. Schedule Management Plan 2. Project Charter 3. Enterprise Environmental Factors 4. Organizational Process Assets 9 Define Activities 1. Schedule Management Plan 1. Activity List 2. Scope Baseline 2. Activity Attributes 3. Enterprise Environmental Factors 3. Milestone List 4. Organizational Process Assets 10 Sequence Activities 1. Schedule Management Plan 1. Project Schedule Network Diagram 2. Activity List 3. Activity Attributes 4. Milestone List 2. Project Document Updates 5. Project Scope Statement 6. Enterprise Environmental Factors 7. Organizational Process Assets 11 Estimate Activity Resources 1. Schedule Management Plan 1. Activity Resource Requirements 2. Activity List 3. Activity Attributes 2. Resource Breakdown Structure 4. Resource Calendars 5. Risk Register 6. Activity Cost Estimates 3. Project Documents Updates 7. Enterprise Environmental Factors 8. Organizational Process Assets *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Inputs/Outputs and Processes (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum
  13. 13. 13 No Process Input Output 12 Estimate Activity Durations 1. Schedule Management Plan 1. Activity Duration Estimates 2. Activity List 3. Activity Attributes 4. Activity Resource Requirements 5. Resource Calendars 6. Project Scope Statement 2. Project Document Updates 7. Risk Register 8. Resource Breakdown Structure 9. Enterprise Environmental Factors 10. Organizational Process Assets 13 Develop Schedule 1. Schedule Management Plan 1. Schedule Baseline 2. Activity List 3. Activity Attributes 2. Project Schedule4. Activity Resource Requirements 5. Project Schedule Network Diagram 6. Resource Calendars 3. Schedule Data 7. Activity Duration Estimates 8. Project Scope Statement 4. Project Calendars 9. Risk Register 10. Project Staff Assignments 5. Project Management Plan Updates 11. Resource Breakdown Structure 12. Enterprise Environmental Factors 6. Project Document Updates 13. Organizational Process Assets 14 Plan Cost Management 1. Project Management Plan 1. Cost Management Plan2. Project Charter 3. Enterprise Environmental Factors 4. Organizational Process Assets *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Inputs/Outputs and Processes (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum
  14. 14. 14 No Process Input Output 15 Estimate Costs 1. Cost Management Plan 1. Activity Cost Estimates 2. Human Resource Management Plan 3. Scope Baseline 2. Basis of Estimates 4. Project Schedule 5. Risk Register 3. Project Documents Updates6. Enterprise Environmental Factors 7. Organizational Process Assets 16 Determine Budget 1. Cost Management Plan 1. Cost Baseline2. Scope Baseline 3. Activity Cost Estimates 4. Basis of Estimates 2. Project Funding Requirements5. Project Schedule 6. Resource Calendars 7. Risk Register 3. Project Document Updates8. Agreements 9. Organizational Process Assets 17 Plan Quality Management 1. Project Management Plan 1. Quality Management Plan 2. Stakeholder Register 2. Process Improvement Plan 3. Risk Register 3. Quality Metrics 4. Requirements Documentation 4. Quality Checklists 5. Enterprise Environmental Factors 5. Project Document Updates 6. Organizational Process Assets *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Inputs/Outputs and Processes (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum
  15. 15. 15 No Process Input Output 18 Plan Human Resource Management 1. Project Management Plan 1. Human Resource Management Plan 2. Activity Resource Requirements 3. Enterprise Environmental Factors 4. Organizational Process Assets 19 Plan Communications Management 1. Project Management Plan 1. Communication Management Plan 2. Stakeholder Register 3. Enterprise Environmental Factors 2. Project Document Updates 4. Organizational Process Assets 20 Plan Risk Management 1. Project Management Plan 1. Risk Management Plan 2. Project Charter 3. Stakeholder Register 4. Enterprise Environmental Factors 5. Organizational Process Assets 21 Identify Risks 1. Risk Mgmt. Plan 2. Cost Mgmt. Plan 1. Risk Register 3. Schedule Mgmt. Plan 4. Qual. Mgmt. Plan 5. HR Mgmt. Plan 6. Scope Baseline 7. Activity Cost Est. 8. Activity Duration Est. 9. Stakeholder Register 10. Project Documents 11. Procurement Documents 12. Enterprise Environmental Factors 13. Organizational Process Assets *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Inputs/Outputs and Processes (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum
  16. 16. 16 No Process Input Output 22 Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis 1. Risk Management Plan 1. Project Document Updates 2. Scope Baseline 3. Risk Register 4. Enterprise Environmental Factors 5. Organizational Process Assets 23 Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis 1. Risk Management Plan 1. Project Document Updates 2. Cost Management Plan 3. Schedule Management Plan 4. Risk Register 5. Enterprise Environmental Factors 6. Organizational Process Assets 24 Plan Risk Responses 1. Risk Management Plan 1. Project Management Plan Updates 2. Risk Register 2. Project Document Updates 25 Plan Procurement Management 1. Project Management Plan 1. Procurement Management Plan 2. Requirements Documentation 2. Procurement Statement of Work 3. Risk Register 3. Procurement Documents 4. Activity Resource Requirements 4. Source Selection Criteria 5. Project Schedule 5. Make-or-buy Decisions 6. Activity Cost Estimates 6. Change Requests 7. Stakeholder Register 8. Enterprise Environmental Factors 7. Project Document Updates 9. Organizational Process Assets *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Inputs/Outputs and Processes (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum
  17. 17. 17 No Process Input Output 26 Plan Stakeholder Management 1. Project Management Plan 1. Stakeholder Management Plan 2. Stakeholder Register 3. Enterprise Environmental Factors 2. Project Document Updates 4. Organizational Process Assets 27 Direct and Manage Project Work 1. Project Management Plan 1. Deliverables 2. Approved Change Requests 2. Work Performance Data 3. Enterprise Environmental Factors 3. Change Requests 4. Organizational Process Assets 4. Project Management Plan Updates 5. Project Document Updates 28 Perform Quality Assurance 1. Quality Management Plan 1. Change Requests 2. Process Improvement Plan 2. Project Management Plan Updates 3. Quality Metrics 3. Project Document Updates 4. Quality Control Measurements 4. Organizational Process Assets Updates 5. Project Documents 29 Acquire Project Team 1. Human Resource Management Plan 1. Project Staff Assignments 2. Enterprise Environmental Factors 2. Resource Calendars 3. Organizational Process Assets 3. Project Management Plan Updates 30 Develop Project Team 1. Human Resource Management Plan 1. Team Performance Assessments 2. Project Staff Assignments 2. Enterprise Environmental Factors Updates 3. Resource Calendars *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Inputs/Outputs and Processes (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum
  18. 18. 18 No Process Input Output 31 Manage Project Team 1. Human Resource Management Plan 1. Change Requests 2. Project Staff Assignments 3. Team Performance Assessments 2. Project Management Plan Updates 4. Issue Log 3. Project Document Updates 5. Work Performance Reports 4. Enterprise Environmental Factors Updates 6. Organizational Process Assets 5. Organizational Process Assets Updates 32 Manage Communications 1. Communication Management Plan 1. Project Communications 2. Work Performance Reports 2. Project Management Plan Updates 3. Enterprise Environmental Factors 3. Project Document Updates 4. Organizational Process Assets 4. Organizational Process Assets Updates 33 Conduct Procurements 1. Procurement Management Plan 1. Selected Sellers 2. Procurement Documents 2. Agreements 3. Source Selection Criteria 3. Resource Calendar 4. Seller Proposals 4. Change Requests 5. Project Documents 5. Project Management Plan Updates 6. Make-or-buy Decisions 7. Procurement Statement of Work 6. Project Document Updates 8. Organizational Process Assets 34 Manage Stakeholder Engagement 1. Stakeholder Management Plan 1. Issue Log 2. Communications Management Plan 2. Change Requests 3. Change Log 3. Project Management Plan Updates 4. Organizational Process Assets 4. Project Document Updates 5. Organizational Process Asset Updates *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Inputs/Outputs and Processes (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum
  19. 19. 19 No Process Input Output 35 Monitor and Control Project Work 1. Project Management Plan 1. Change Requests 2. Schedule Forecasts 3. Cost Forecasts 2. Work Performance Reports 4. Validated Changes 3. Project Management Plan Updates 5. Work Performance Information 4. Project Document Updates 6. Enterprise Environmental Factors 7. Organizational Process Assets 36 Perform Integrated Change Control 1. Project Management Plan 1. Approved Change Requests 2. Work Performance Reports 2. Change Log 3. Change Requests 3. Project Management Plan Updates 4. Enterprise Environmental Factors 4. Project Document Updates 5. Organizational Process Assets 37 Validate Scope 1. Project Management Plan 1. Accepted Deliverables 2. Requirements Documentations 2. Change Requests 3. Requirements Traceability Matrix 3. Work Performance Information 4. Verified Deliverables 4. Project Document Updates 5. Work Performance Data 38 Control Scope 1. Project Management Plan 1. Work Performance Information 2. Requirements Documentation 2. Change Requests 3. Requirements Traceability Matrix 3. Project Management Plan Updates 4. Work Performance Data 4. Project Document Updates 5. Organizational Process Assets 5. Organizational Process Assets Updates *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Inputs/Outputs and Processes (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum
  20. 20. 20 No Process Input Output 39 Control Schedule 1. Project Management Plan 1. Work Performance Information 2. Project Schedule 3. Work Performance Data 2. Schedule Forecasts 4. Project Calendars 3. Change Requests 5. Schedule Data 4. Project Management Plan Updates 6. Organizational Process Assets 5. Organizational Process Assets Updates 40 Control Costs 1. Project Management Plan 1. Work Performance Information 2. Project Funding Requirements 2. Cost Forecasts 3. Work Performance Information 3. Change Requests 4. Organizational Process Assets 4. Project Management Plan Updates 5. Project Document Updates 6. Organizational Process Assets Updates 41 Control Quality 1. Project Management Plan 1. Quality Control Measurements 2. Quality Metrics 2. Validated Changes 3. Quality Checklists 3. Verified Deliverables 4. Work Performance Data 4. Work Performance Information 5. Approved Change Requests 5. Change Requests 6. Deliverables 6. Project Management Plan Updates 7. Project Documents 7. Project Document Updates 8. Organizational Process Assets 8. Organizational Process Asset Updates *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Inputs/Outputs and Processes (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum
  21. 21. 21 No Process Input Output 42 Control Communications 1. Project Management Plan 1. Work Performance Information 2. Change Requests2. Project Communications 3. Issue Log 3. Project Management Plan Updates 4. Work Performance Data 4. Project Document Updates 5. Organizational Process Assets 5. Organizational Process Assets Updates 43 Control Risks 1. Project Management Plan 1. Work Performance Information 2. Risk Register 2. Change Requests 3. Work Performance Data 3. Project Management Plan Updates 4. Work Performance Reports 4. Project Document Updates 5. Organizational Process Assets Updates 44 Control Procurements 1. Project Management Plan 1. Work Performance Information 2. Procurement Documents 2. Change Requests 3. Agreements 3. Project Management Plan Updates 4. Approved Change Requests 4. Project Document Updates 5. Work Performance Reports 5. Organizational Process Assets Updates 6. Work Performance Data 45 Control Stakeholder Engagement 1. Project Management Plan 1. Work Performance Information 2. Issue Log 2. Change Requests 3. Work Performance Data 3. Project Management Plan Updates 4. Project Documents 4. Project Document Updates 5. Organizational Process Assets Updates *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Inputs/Outputs and Processes (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum
  22. 22. 22 No Process Input Output 46 Close Project or Phase 1. Project Management Plan 1. Final Product, Service or Result Transition 2. Accepted Deliverables 2. Organizational Process Assets Updates 3. Organizational Process Assets Updates 47 Close Procurements 1. Project Management Plan 1. Closed Procurements 2. Procurement Documents 2. Organizational Process Assets Updates *All Registered Trademarks and Service Marks are the property of the Project Management Institute PMBOK 5 Inputs/Outputs and Processes (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum
  23. 23. 23 Introduction to SCRUM Framework Module 2 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  24. 24. 24 • An alternative to mainstream/waterfall project management • Focus on customer/user satisfaction • Adapts well to deal with uncertainties and changing situations • Delivers in increments following an iterative process • Continuous attention to all aspects of delivery – Planning, Design, Delivery, Quality • Empowers team to make decisions • Follows an inspect-and-adapt approach Understanding Agile PM
  25. 25. 25 Incrementing calls for a fully formed idea “incrementing” builds a bit at a time © Jeff Patton, all rights reserved, www.AgileProductDesign.com Iterating allows you to move from vague idea to realization. “iterating” builds a rough version, validates it, then slowly builds up quality It is not an iteration if you only do it once Iterative vs Incremental PM
  26. 26. 26 © Jeff Patton, all rights reserved, www.AgileProductDesign.com The increment adds completely new features, based on user stories, hence expanding the scope of the functionality offered – that makes it incremental. But each increment is also likely to refine existing functionality – that makes it iterative. Agile and Scrum is Both Incremental and Iterative
  27. 27. • Waterfall-Plan Driven Approach: Scope remains fixed, while Resources and Schedules are adjusted • Agile-Value Driven Approach: Scope is adjusted while Resources and Schedules are fixed Waterfall-Plan Driven Agile-Value Driven Fixed: Features Resources Schedule Variable: Resources Schedule Features Paradigm Shift
  28. 28. Waterfall vs Agile in Diagram
  29. 29. 29 Agile – Value Proposition
  30. 30. 30 Agile – Value Proposition (cont’d)
  31. 31. 31 • Project will be staffed with qualified & disciplined individuals. • Interfaces are well-defined. • Deliverables can be reasonably distributed in work packets achievable in 2 - 4 week periods. • Responsiveness to customer requests defines success. • Customer or customer representative is available for close collaboration throughout the project. • Scope can be adjusted to fit schedule. When to Use Agile?
  32. 32. 32 • Customer is able to reprioritize and add requirements as they progress. • Work is ground-breaking with steps defined by progress resulting in estimates that are not expected to be reliable. • Incremental results have significant value. • Process is by nature iterative, allowing for cumulative results though sprints, and for overlapping planning for the next sprint while work takes place in the current sprint. When to Use Agile? (cont’d)
  33. 33. Relationship between Values, Principles and Practices Respond to change
  34. 34. Agile Manifesto (http://agilemanifesto.org/) 34 We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  35. 35. Agile Principles 2018 Agile & Scrum 35 Lists 12 principles to guide teams on how to execute with agility: 1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. 2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer’s competitive advantage. 3. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with preference to the shorter timescale. 4. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. 5. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. 6. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation. 7. Working software is the primary measure of progress.
  36. 36. Agile Principles (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum 36 8. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. 9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. 10.Simplicity -- the art of maximizing the amount of work not done -- is essential. 11.The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams. 12.At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behaviour accordingly.
  37. 37. Agile Framework/Methodology 37 Methodology Notes Scrum Ken Schwaber, Jeff Sutherland; Process skeleton; Most widely used in industry. It is revolutionary in nature XP (Extreme Programming) Kent Beck; More prescriptive, processes and technical practices (eg: Pair Programming, TDD, Simple Design, Collective Code Ownership) Lean Iterative methodology originally developed by Mary and Tom Poppendieck. Lean Software Development owes much of its principles and practices to the Lean Enterprise movement and the practices of companies like Toyota. Focus is on delivering value, efficiency . Is based on 7 key principles Kanban Methodology David Anderson, Andy Carmichael Uses Kanban to implement full life cycle. Has 6 principled and practices each. It is evolutionary in nature Crystal Clear Alistair Cockburn; focus on people Dynamic Systems Development (DSDM) Based on nine key principles that primarily revolve around business needs/value, active user involvement, empowered teams, frequent delivery, integrated testing, and stakeholder collaboration. Follows the MOSCOW model for prioritization Feature Driven Development (FDD) Originally developed and articulated by Jeff De Luca, with contributions by M.A. Rajashima, Lim Bak Wee, Paul Szego, Jon Kern and Stephen Palmer. Has 8 key practices (Developing by Feature Class Code Ownership, Feature Team, Inspections, Frequent Releases etc..) October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  38. 38. Advantages of Agile 2018 Agile & Scrum 38 • Change is embraced With shorter planning cycles, it’s easy to accommodate and accept changes at any time during the project. There is always an opportunity to refine and reprioritize the backlog, letting teams introduce changes to the project in a matter of weeks. • End-goal can be unknown Agile is very beneficial for projects where the end-goal is not clearly defined. As the project progresses, the goals will come to light and development can easily adapt to these evolving requirements. • Faster, high-quality delivery Breaking down the project into iterations (manageable units) allows the team to focus on high-quality development, testing, and collaboration. Conducting testing during each iteration means that bugs get identified and solved more quickly. And this high-quality software can be delivered faster with consistent, successive iterations.
  39. 39. Advantages of Agile (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum 39 • Strong team interaction It highlights the importance of frequent communication and face- to-face interactions. Teams work together and people are able to take responsibility and own parts of the projects. • Customers are heard Customers have many opportunities to see the work being delivered, share their input, and have a real impact on the end product. They can gain a sense of ownership by working so closely with the project team. • Continuous improvement Agile projects encourage feedback from users and team members throughout the whole project, so lessons learned are used to improve future iterations.
  40. 40. Disadvantages of Agile 2018 Agile & Scrum 40 • Planning can be less concrete It can sometimes be hard to pin down a solid delivery date. Because Agile is based on time-boxed delivery and project managers are often reprioritizing tasks, it’s possible that some items originally scheduled for delivery may not be complete in time. And, additional sprints may be added at any time in the project, adding to the overall timeline. • Team must be knowledgeable Agile teams are usually small, so team members must be highly skilled in a variety of areas. They also must understand and feel comfortable with the chosen Agile methodology.
  41. 41. Disadvantages of Agile (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum 41 • Time commitment from developers Agile is most successful when the development team is completely dedicated to the project. Active involvement and collaboration is required throughout the Agile process, which is more time consuming than a traditional approach. It also means that the developers need to commit to the entire duration of the project. • Documentation can be neglected The Agile Manifesto prefers working software over comprehensive documentation, so some team members may feel like it’s less important to focus on documentation. While comprehensive documentation on its own does not lead to project success, Agile teams should find the right balance between documentation and discussion.
  42. 42. Disadvantages of Agile (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum 42 • Final product can be very different The initial Agile project might not have a definitive plan, so the final product can look much different than what was initially intended. Because Agile is so flexible, new iterations may be added based on evolving customer feedback, which can lead to a very different final deliverable.
  43. 43. 43 • A framework within which people can address complex adaptive problems, while productively and creatively delivering products of the highest possible value. • Lightweight, Simple to understand, Difficult to master • Empirical Process: Inspect, Adapt, Transparency • I and I approach to optimize predictability and control risk • Emphasis on Collaboration • See change as opportunity • A revolutionary approach What is Scrum?
  44. 44. 44 • Takeuchi and Nonaka – coined in The New Product Development Game in 1986 • 1993 First Project Easel Corp by Jeff Sutherland, formalized by Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland in 1995 • 2002 Scrum Alliance formed • It is now probably the fastest-growing approach to software development globally • Used in many Fortune 100 companies globally such as Nokia, HP, EMC, GE, Google, SUN, Infosys, Wipro, IBM, and Facebook, among others Mike Cohn: An agile framework that allows us to focus on delivering the highest business value in the shortest time” Scrum Historical Perspectives
  45. 45. Product Backlog Sprint Backlog Sprint Potentially shippable Product Increment Sprint Review and Sprint Retrospective Daily Scrum Sprint Planning Scrum Project Life Cycle
  46. 46. 46 “Delivery Early. Delivery Often” “Empower your Teams” “Inspect and Adapt 5 Time-boxes 3 Artifacts 3 Roles 11 Techniques3 Key Tenets
  47. 47. Scrum Values
  48. 48. Advantages of Scrum 2018 Agile & Scrum 48 • More transparency and project visibility With daily stand-up meetings, the whole team knows who is doing what, eliminating many misunderstandings and confusion. Issues are identified in advance, allowing the team to resolve them before they get out of hand. • Increased team accountability There is no project manager telling the Scrum Team what to do and when. Instead, the team collectively decides what work they can complete in each sprint. They all work together and help each other, improving collaboration and empowering each team member to be independent.
  49. 49. Advantages of Scrum (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum 49 • Easy to accommodate changes With short sprints and constant feedback, it’s easier to cope with and accommodate changes. For example, if the team discovers a new user story during one sprint, they can easily add that feature to the next sprint during the backlog refinement meeting. • Increased cost savings Constant communication ensures the team is aware of all issues and changes as soon as they arise, helping to lower expenses and increase quality. By coding and testing features in smaller chunks, there is continuous feedback and mistakes can be corrected early on, before they get too expensive to fix.
  50. 50. Disadvantages of Scrum 2018 Agile & Scrum 50 • Risk of scope creep Some Scrum projects can experience scope creep due to a lack of specific end date. With no completion date, stakeholders may be tempted to keep requesting additional functionality. • Team requires experience and commitment With defined roles and responsibilities, the team needs to be familiar with Scrum principles to succeed. Because there are no defined roles in the Scrum Team (everyone does everything), it requires team members with technical experience. The team also needs to commit to the daily Scrum meetings and to stay on the team for the duration of the project.
  51. 51. Disadvantages of Scrum (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum 51 • The wrong Scrum Master can ruin everything The Scrum Master is very different from a project manager. The Scrum Master does not have authority over the team; he or she needs to trust the team they are managing and never tell them what to do. If the Scrum Master tries to control the team, the project will fail. • Poorly defined tasks can lead to inaccuracies Project costs and timelines won’t be accurate if tasks are not well defined. If the initial goals are unclear, planning becomes difficult and sprints can take more time than originally estimated.
  52. 52. 52 SCRUM International Certifications Module 3 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  53. 53. ScrumAlliance The Organization • Founded in 2001 • The largest, most established and influential professional membership (non profit) organization in Agile community • Having certified 450,000+ individuals worldwide. • Offering 6 (six) certifications. • Having 275 User Groups across the globe. • Vision is to "Transform the World of Work.” • Mission is to guide and inspire individuals, leaders, and organizations with practices, principles, and values that create workplaces that are joyful, prosperous, and sustainable. • In short, Scrum at the foundation of all our products, services, and solutions. 532018 Agile & Scrum
  54. 54. ScrumAlliance Certifications 542018 Agile & Scrum
  55. 55. 552018 Agile & Scrum
  56. 56. 562018 Agile & Scrum
  57. 57. ScrumAlliance’s CSP Certification Requirements • Be a current holder of an active CSM, CSPO, or CSD credential. • Min. of 36 months of successful Agile/Scrum work experience gained in the past 5 years implementing Scrum inside organizations as team member, product owner, ScrumMaster, or "Other." • 70 SEUs from the past three years (Note: CSM (up to 16 SEUs), CSD (up to 24 SEUs), and/or CSPO (up to 16 SEUs)). • Our CSD, CSM, or CSPO training can be 3+ years old. • USD 100 nonrefundable application fee and USD 150 for certification approval fee. 572018 Agile & Scrum
  58. 58. ScrumAlliance’s CSP Certification (cont’d) How to earn SEUs • Category A: Scrum Alliance Scrum Gatherings Up to 45 SEUs can be earned at a rate of one credit per hour of participation in Scrum Alliance Global Gatherings, Scrum Alliance Regional Gatherings, Scrum Coaching Retreats, and Scrum Alliance- Sponsored Events, as well as in Scrum Alliance-endorsed User Group events and activities (presenting, coaching, and attending sessions). • Category B: Scrum Alliance Courses or Coaching Min. 14 SEUs required for this category. Received training from CSM /CSPO/CSD/CST/REP or coaching by a CEC. 582018 Agile & Scrum
  59. 59. ScrumAlliance’s CSP Certification (cont’d) • Category C: Outside Events Up to 15 SEUs and earned one credit per hour of active participation. Attended live Scrum/Agile or User Group events or received Coaching/Mentoring outside of Scrum Alliance. • Category D: Volunteer Service Up to 15 SEUs earned by providing non- compensated, professional Scrum services. 592018 Agile & Scrum
  60. 60. ScrumAlliance’s CSP Certification (cont’d) • Category E: Independent Learning Up to 15 SEUs earned through various independent learning activities (preparing/not delivering presentations; authoring relevant books/articles/blogs; watching a training video; reading books. • Category F: Other Collaborative Learning Up to 15 SEUs earned through a variety of other collaborative learning activities engaged in with other Scrum practitioners e.g. attending webinar, etc. 602018 Agile & Scrum
  61. 61. ScrumAlliance’s CSP Certification (cont’d) Renewing CSP with SEUs Required min. 40 SEUs within two years. No category limits. Up to 90 days past our CSP expiration date. USD 250 renewal fee. Membership: http://membership.scrumallia nce.org/?page=Membership s 612018 Agile & Scrum
  62. 62. 622018 Agile & Scrum
  63. 63. ScrumAlliance’s CSM Certification • Certified ScrumMaster® • Requirements – Enroll in-person, two-day (16-hour) CSM course from a Scrum Alliance Authorized Trainer – Take online CSM test (at least 24 out of 35 Qs) 632018 Agile & Scrum
  64. 64. 642018 Agile & Scrum
  65. 65. ScrumAlliance’s CSPO Certification • Certified Scrum Product Owner® (CSPO) • Requirements –Attend an in- person, two-day CSPO course taught by a Certified Scrum Trainer 652018 Agile & Scrum
  66. 66. 662018 Agile & Scrum
  67. 67. ScrumAlliance’s CSD Certification • Certified Scrum Developer (CSD) • Requirements – >= Five days of formal training taught by a Scrum Alliance REP and a Scrum Alliance Authorized Instructor. – Passed the classroom-based assessment/exam. – Two tracks • Track 1 CSM course (2 days) CSD “Agile Engineering Practices” technical course (3 days) • Track 2 CSD Intro course (1 day) CSD “Agile Engineering Practices” technical course (3 days) CSD Technical Elective course (1 day) 672018 Agile & Scrum
  68. 68. 682018 Agile & Scrum
  69. 69. ScrumAlliance’s CTC Certification • Certified Team Coach (CTC) • What CTC does? – Works with Scrum teams, stakeholders, and management to improve performance and outcomes. – Provides coaching, facilitation, training, mentoring, impediment management, and leadership in support of collaboration, development consistency, and value delivery across multiple teams and departments. – Unlike a CSM, CTC works across multiple teams. – Unlike a CEC, CTC focuses on a subset of an organization in a project or program, or across multiple teams. 692018 Agile & Scrum
  70. 70. ScrumAlliance’s CTC Certification (cont’d) • Requirements – Active CSP designation. – Demonstrate a minimum of 2 years and 1,000 hours of Scrum coaching experience across a diversity of teams. – Demonstrate active engagement in, contribution to, and leadership in the Scrum community over a minimum of 2 years. – Demonstrate a journey of learning through formal and informal education and mentor relationships. – Provide two different client recommendations and one mentor recommendation to verify coaching experience and skills. – Complete a two-part application process that is both quantitative and qualitative. 702018 Agile & Scrum
  71. 71. 712018 Agile & Scrum
  72. 72. ScrumAlliance’s CEC Certification • Certified Enterprise Coach (CEC) • What CEC does? – Coach organization towards Agile transformation. – Experts in Scrum both theory and practice. – Have in-depth understanding of practices and principles of Scrum and real-world experience in actual Scrum organizations. – Have deep experience in leadership coaching, organizational transformation, and Agile practices at the enterprise level. – Have had years of practice (successes and failures) in Scrum at multiple levels of engagement at the leadership level. – Must demonstrate experiences as organizational change agent working across multiple team and organizational boundaries. 722018 Agile & Scrum
  73. 73. ScrumAlliance’s CEC Certification • Requirements Experience • I have held an active CSP designation for a minimum of 1 year. • I have significant hands-on experience in at least one of the roles on a Scrum Team. • I have coached in 3 or more organizations, departments, or programs. • I have a minimum of 3 years and 2,000 hours of experience coaching at the enterprise/organizational level or a combination of enterprise and multi-team level coaching. • I have a diversity of coaching experiences that I can demonstrate using different client engagement examples, and which include experience at the organizational level. Knowledge • I have formal and informal education about coaching and strong mentor relationships. • I have a good working knowledge of Agile and Lean values, principles, and practices. • I have helped individuals, teams, and leadership to understand and apply Agile and Lean values, principles, and practices effectively. • I understand the dynamics, patterns, and development of multi-level teams and how they interact at the organizational level. • I can clearly describe the difference between consulting and coaching and know when to apply each. 732018 Agile & Scrum
  74. 74. ScrumAlliance’s CEC Certification (cont’d) Professional Collaboration • I can provide two different client recommendations and one mentor recommendation to verify my coaching experience and skills. • I have had active engagement in, contribution to, and leadership in, the Scrum community over a minimum of 3 years • I have participated in at least 5 private or public Scrum- or Agile-related events and have contributed to some of these as an organizer, presenter, collaborator or facilitator. Skills • I have contributed to significant improvements in organizations or departments through coaching techniques. • I have helped organizations and teams beyond the basics of Scrum theory and practice. • I have enabled organizations to find their own solutions to business problems through the application of Agile principles. • I am familiar with, promote and embody the mindset of Servant Leadership. • I use a rich set of facilitation, training and coaching tools, and models. 742018 Agile & Scrum
  75. 75. Mapping SA Certs to Agile Team Roles 752018 Agile & Scrum
  76. 76. 762018 Agile & Scrum
  77. 77. PMI ACP • Stands for PMI Agile Certified Practitioner • Spans across Agile methodology such as Scrum, Kanban, Lean, extreme programming (XP) and test-driven development (TDD). • Requirements – 2,000 hours of general project experience working on teams. – 1,500 hours working on agile project teams or with agile methodologies. – 21 training hours in agile practices. 772018 Agile & Scrum
  78. 78. PMI ACP (cont’d) • Exam format: 120 multiple- choice questions • Exam duration: Three hours. • To maintain: 30 professional development units (PDUs) in three years. • PMI member US$435, PMI non-member US$495. 782018 Agile & Scrum
  79. 79. 792018 Agile & Scrum
  80. 80. Professional Scrum Master • From Scrum.org • PSM I • Fee: $150 per attempt • Passing score: 85% • Number of Questions: 80 • Time limit: 60 minutes • Format: Multiple Choice, Multiple Answer and True/False • Difficulty: Intermediate • Language: English only • Required course: None • Recommended courses: Professional Scrum Foundations or Professional Scrum Master • PSM Subject Areas October 2018 Agile with Scrum 80
  81. 81. Professional Scrum Master (cont’d) PSM II • Fee: $250 • Passing score: 85% • Time limit: 90 minutes • Number of Questions: 30 • Difficulty: Advanced • Format: Multiple Choice, Multiple Answer and True/False • Language: English only • PSM II Subject Areas • Required course: None • Recommended courses: Professional Scrum Master and Professional Scrum Master II • Recommended Certification: PSM I • Practice assessments: PSM I, PSPO I, PSD I, Scrum Open October 2018 Agile with Scrum 81
  82. 82. Professional Scrum Master (cont’d) PSM III • Fee: $500 • Passing score: 85% • Time limit: 120 minutes • Format: Combination of 34 Multiple Choice and essay • Difficulty: Advanced • Language: English only • PSM Subject Areas • PSM II Subject Areas • Required course: None • Recommended courses: Professional Scrum Master and Professional Scrum Master II • Required assessment: PSM I (must pass) and PSM II • Practice assessment: Scrum Open, Nexus Open, Developer Open and Product Owner Open. October 2018 Agile with Scrum 82
  83. 83. Professional Scrum Product Owner PSPO I • Fee: $200 per attempt • Passing score: 85% • Time limit: 60 minutes • Number of Questions: 80 • Format: Multiple Choice, Multiple Answer and True/False • Difficulty: Intermediate • Language: English only • PSPO Subject Areas • Required course: None • Recommended course: Professional Scrum Product Owner • Practice assessments: Scrum Open and Product Owner Open October 2018 Agile with Scrum 83
  84. 84. Professional Scrum Product Owner (cont’d) PSPO II • Fee: $500 • Passing score: 85% • Time limit: 120 minutes • Format: Multiple Choice and essay • Difficulty: Advanced • Language: English only • PSPO Subject Areas • Required course: None • Recommended course: Professional Scrum Product Owner • Ways to Learn More to help you prepare • Required assessment: PSPO I (must pass) • Practice assessments: Scrum Open and Product Owner Open October 2018 Agile with Scrum 84
  85. 85. Professional Scrum Developer PSD • Fee: $200 per attempt • Passing score: 85% • Time limit: 60 minutes • Number of Questions: 80 • Format: Multiple Choice, Multiple Answer and True/False • Difficulty: Intermediate • Language: English only • Scrum Developer Subject Areas • Ways to Learn More to help you prepare • Required course: None • Recommended course: Professional Scrum Developer • Practice assessments: Scrum Open and Scrum Developer Open October 2018 Agile with Scrum 85
  86. 86. Professional Agile Leadership PAL • Fee: $200 per attempt • Passing score: 85% • Time limit: 60 minutes • Number of Questions: 36 • Format: Multiple Choice, Multiple Answer and True/False • Difficulty: Intermediate • Language: English only • PAL Subject Areas • Required course: None • Recommended course: Professional Agile Leadership Essentials (PAL-E) • Practice assessments: Agile Leadership Open, Scrum Open October 2018 Agile with Scrum 86
  87. 87. Professional Scrum with Kanban PSK • Fee: $200 per attempt • Passing score: 85% • Time limit: 60 minutes • Number of Questions: 45 • Format: Multiple Choice, Multiple Answer and True/False • Difficulty: Intermediate • Language: English only • PSK Subject Areas • Required course: None • Recommended course: Professional Scrum with Kanban • Practice assessments: Scrum with Kanban Open October 2018 Agile with Scrum 87
  88. 88. Scaled Professional Scrum SPS • Fee: $250 • Passing score: 85% or greater • Time limit: 60 minutes • Number of Questions: 40 • Format: Multiple Choice, Multiple Answer, and True/False • Difficulty: Intermediate • Language: English only • Related Guide: Nexus Guide • Required course: None • Recommended course: Scaled Professional Scrum Workshop • Ways to Learn More to help you prepare • Practice Assessment: Nexus Open October 2018 Agile with Scrum 88
  89. 89. 89 Roles and Artifacts in SCRUM Module 4 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  90. 90. 90 Product Owner Scrum Master Scrum Team Stakeholders & Users Customer voice who establishes vision, prioritizes the work and defines success criteria The servant-leader who empowers the team, facilitates the process, and removes impediments, if any People who deliver customer/ user value Individual, groups and organizations that have interests and attain the benefits from the project deliverable October 2018 Agile with Scrum Roles in Scrum
  91. 91. Product Owner • Owns vision for the product to be produced/released • Represents client organization or acts as principal interface to the client • Creates and maintains Product Backlog • Final decision maker on prioritization of Product Backlog items • Provides support in removing obstacles October 2018 Agile with Scrum 91
  92. 92. Scrum Master • Facilitates implementation of the process • Ensure team lives by values and practices • Removes team’s constraints and impediments • Protects team from overcommitting • Protects team from external disturbances • Empowers team through Servant Leadership • Coaches team for successful implementation • Builds self-organizing teams 92
  93. 93. Scrum Team • Constitutes of 3-9 individual • Cross-functional team includes design, coding, testing, and other resources required for potentially shippable deliverable • Takes responsibility to determine how to best achieve product goals set by PO • Plans and manages the project by working in incremental and iterative manner • Collaborates closely with PO and SM • Inspects and Adapts through Daily Scrum and Retrospective • Assists PO to groom the backlog October 2018 Agile with Scrum 93
  94. 94. Project Manager and Product Owner in SCRUM October 2018 Agile with Scrum 94
  95. 95. 95 Time-Boxed Event For Sprints of 4 Weeks For Sprints of 2 Weeks For Sprints of 1 Week Sprint Planning 1 Day Half-Day 2 Hours Sprint 20 Days 10 Days 5 Days Sprint Review Half-Day 2 Hours 1 Hours Sprint Retrospective Half-Day 2 Hours 1 Hours Daily Scrum 15 Minutes 15 Minutes 15 Minutes These are the maximum durations of each timebox. Meetings may adjourn early if the agenda is completed. October 2018 Agile with Scrum Duration of Timeboxes
  96. 96. 96 • Product Backlog • Sprint Backlog • Incremental potential shippable product • Burn Down Charts • Burn Up Charts Artifacts Information Radiators October 2018 Agile with Scrum Artifacts and Information Radiators
  97. 97. 97October 2018 Agile with Scrum Information Radiators
  98. 98. 98 Requirements Management Module 5 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  99. 99. 99 • Contains a broad list of descriptions of all required features, wish-list items, etc. • Prioritization by business value. • It’s the “What” that will be built. • It contains rough estimates of both business value and development effort. • Product Owner is in charge of defining priorities in the Product Backlog. • Maintains Story Lists. October 2018 Agile with Scrum Product Backlog
  100. 100. 100October 2018 Agile with Scrum Product Backlog (cont’d)
  101. 101. 101 As a (role) I want (something) so that (benefit). October 2018 Agile with Scrum User Story
  102. 102. 102 Card User Story information is lightweight. It fits onto a single index card. Conversation When the story is selected for a Sprint, further details are finalized in conversations with the Product Owner. Confirmation Acceptance criteria are added to the User Story, to confirm the feature was implemented properly. October 2018 Agile with Scrum User Story 3C Principles
  103. 103. 103 As a customer service representative, I can search for a customer so that I can view his/her account details. • When searching by a valid account number, the account is shown. • When searching by a valid name and Citizenship ID, the account is shown. • If no results are found, show appropriate message. • Acceptance tests? October 2018 Agile with Scrum Example of User Story
  104. 104. 104 Every user story (requirement) should meet the below criteria (INVEST acronym) for it to be considered complete. • Independent • Negotiable • Valuable (to users/customers) • Estimate-able • Small • Testable October 2018 Agile with Scrum User Story INVEST Principle
  105. 105. 105October 2018 Agile with Scrum Hierarchy of Requirements As known as Epic
  106. 106. 106 Theme ▪ A set of related user stories that may be combined together and treated as a single entity for either estimating or release planning ▪ Kept for ease of estimation and planning ▪ Example: Support for Database → Will involve defining schema, migrating existing data, creating reports and so on Epic ▪ Large user stories with low priority and too big to implement on one iteration ▪ Broken down further into smaller user stories and the lower level child stories are assigned priorities for planning October 2018 Agile with Scrum Relationship Between Theme and Epic
  107. 107. • Epic describes what the customer would typically request and understand • Epic typically contains one or more stories • Agile team along with PO breaks epic into stories (independent and deliverable) • Example o Epic: As a credit analyst, I need the ability to check the customer’s credit rating o Story 1: As a credit analyst, I need the ability to check the prior payment history of the customer o Story 2: As a credit analyst, I need the ability to calculate our internal credit rating based on history and credit report Relationship Between Epic and Story
  108. 108. 108 Jeff Patton: • Decompose High Level Activity into a workflow with further decomposition • Divide into a hierarchy of Epics, Themes and Stories • Natural prioritization can emerge October 2018 Agile with Scrum Story Mapping
  109. 109. October 2018 Agile with Scrum 109
  110. 110. User Story Splitting 110 • A story may not fit within an iteration, it’s too large to estimate (epic) • Examples (from Mike Cohn – Agile Estimating and Planning) In some cases a large story can be made much smaller by removing the handling of exceptional or error conditions from the main story. For example, suppose you are working on a system to process loan repayments and have this user story: “As a borrower, I want to payoff my loan.” When the team discusses this story, the product owner points out that if the borrower inadvertently sends a check for more than the outstanding loan amount, a refund check has to be printed and mailed back to the borrower. She then adds that this only applies for amounts over $2. This story could be split by writing the following stories: • Split by Data Boundary • As a borrower, I want to pay off my loan o As a borrower, I want to pay off my loan without overpayments o As a borrower if I accidentally repay too much, I get a refund if it’s over $2 • Split by Operational Boundaries – C.R.U.D. • Cross cutting concerns, e.g. logging can be another user story October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  111. 111. 111 Must have (or Minimum Usable Subset) Should have Could have Won’t have (but Would like in future) ‘Must Haves‘ are features that must be included before the product can be launched. It is good to have clarity on this before a project begins, as this is the minimum scope for the product to be useful. ‘Should Haves‘ are features that are not critical to launch, but are considered to be important and of a high value to the user. October 2018 Agile with Scrum Requirements Prioritization: MoSCoW
  112. 112. 112October 2018 Agile with Scrum Requirements Prioritization: MoSCoW (cont’d) ‘Could Haves‘ are features that are nice to have and could potentially be included without incurring too much effort or cost. These will be the first features to be removed from scope if the project’s timescales are later at risk. ‘Won’t Haves‘ are features that have been requested but are explicitly excluded from scope for the planned duration, and may be included in a future phase of development.
  113. 113. 113 Project Estimation and Planning Module 6 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  114. 114. 114 • Expert Judgement • Analogous/Top-Down • Parametric Estimate • Bottom Up Decomposition October 2018 Agile with Scrum Mainstream Estimation Techniques
  115. 115. 115 • An iterative approach to estimating • Each estimator is given a deck of cards, each card has a valid estimate (Fibonacci series) written on it • Customer/Product owner reads a story and it’s discussed briefly • Each estimator selects a card that’s his or her estimate • Cards are turned over so all can see them • Discuss differences (especially outliers) • Re-estimate until estimates converge Estimation Through Playing Poker
  116. 116. 116 PO Presents Story • Team asks questions Team Members choose a card • Discussion about values occurs Agreement? • Yes – value noted – start with next story No – Discuss differences High and Low How to Play the Poker
  117. 117. 117 • The rate at which the team is delivering, measured in story points per day/sprint • Only user stories that meet the defined ‘Done’ criteria shall be accounted for while counting story points • Partially completed stories shall not be considered ❖ Don’t imply precision by saying you completed 4.7 points out of 8 ❖ That last 10% can take 90% of the time ❖ The business value is not achieved until it is done completely in all respects • The average velocity of the previous sprints is typically used as the planned velocity of the next sprint. Measuring Velocity
  118. 118. 118 1 1 1 2 2 3 2 15 Story Points 12 Story Points 14 Story Points Team velocity is ~14 Points per Sprint 5 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 3 2 Sprint 1 Sprint 2 Sprint 3 Determining Team Velocity
  119. 119. 119 Consider • Risk (sharp knife, spiky/slippery skin) • Effort (size of fruit) • Complexity (cutting difficulty) • Relativity (to existing estimates) Definition of Done • All seeds removed (except strawberry & banana) • All fruit to be washed • Bite-sized pieces Acceptance Criteria • Rock melon, banana, mango, coconut, pineapple skin off • Pear, apple skin on ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? 1/2 point 5 points 8 points 20 points October 2018 Agile with Scrum Example of Estimation
  120. 120. 120 Adapted from Ilan Goldstein October 2018 Agile with Scrum Back to Fruit Salad
  121. 121. 5 Levels of Scrum Planning October 2018 Agile with Scrum 121
  122. 122. 122 • Release Plan is a high level plan for multiple sprints • Contains features that will be implemented during this release and a broad sprint by sprint plan. • This will change when navigating from Sprint to Sprint. Understand the goal Understand the customer requirement Prioritize and estimate the backlog Calculate the team velocity Create a release plan Communicate the release plan October 2018 Agile with Scrum Release Planning
  123. 123. 123 RELEASE 1.0 RELEASE 1.5 RELEASE 2.0 October 2018 Agile with Scrum Where is Release Planning at?
  124. 124. October 2018 Agile with Scrum 124
  125. 125. Sprint Planning October 2018 Agile with Scrum 125
  126. 126. 126 Calculate the team’s capacity availability for the upcoming Sprint 1 5 people x 2 wks x 6hrs/day: 300.0 Minus vacation: 224.0 Minus 20% Slack/ Risk Buffer: 179.2 Commitment Cap: 179.2 Prepare task estimates for prioritized user stories of upcoming sprint 2 Compare capacity vs estimates and confirm commitment is reasonable 3 176 Hrs 179 Hrs ≈ 176 Hrs October 2018 Agile with Scrum Sprint Planning (cont’d)
  127. 127. 127 • In the first half, the Product Owner briefs the team on the next priorities from the Product Backlog, and the Team selects a set of items they deem reasonable. • In the second half, the team decomposes the commitments into the Sprint Backlog of action items and tasks needed to accomplish those commitments. • Many teams spend too much effort pre-assigning Sprint Backlog action items to Team Members, often causing the Sprint Planning to last many hours too long. • Consider leaving the task assignments until later. This will allow Team Members the opportunity to self-assign the tasks, generating more buy-in. • The Sprint Backlog is an imperfect living work plan. 30-40% of the Sprint Backlog tasks will change over the course of the Sprint. • Consider deferring the task definition for those items that are not fully understood. Divide the Planning into 2 Halves Defer Task Assignments Defer Unknown Details October 2018 Agile with Scrum Sprint Planning – Best Practice
  128. 128. 128October 2018 Agile with Scrum Scrum Planning with MS Project
  129. 129. 129 Project Execution Module 7 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  130. 130. 2018Agile & Scrum 130
  131. 131. Stages of Expertise 131Source: Meilir Page-Jones 2018 Agile with Scrum
  132. 132. Stages of Expertise (cont’d) 132Source: Meilir Page-Jones2018 Agile with Scrum
  133. 133. Stages of Expertise (cont’d) 133Source: Meilir Page-Jones2018 Agile with Scrum
  134. 134. 134 Project Monitoring and Tracking Module 8 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  135. 135. 135 Purpose • Enable to team to share progress with each other • Make visible blocks (impediments) daily for whole team to see Everyone reports 3 things • What did I do since the last Daily Scrum Meeting? • What will I try to do by the next Daily Scrum meeting? • What are the challenges/blockers, I need help on Duration: Approx 3 minutes per person Participants: Team and Scrum Master only. PO can be part of the meeting. October 2018 Agile with Scrum Daily Standup
  136. 136. 136 • Was first introduced as part of Toyota Production System in early 1980s • Was coined by Alistair Cockburn in 2001 • Graphical Representation of Project Status & Key aspects displayed in Team Workspace • Can be handwritten, drawn, printed • Keeps team focused on tasks and actions needing priority and attention • Helps drive transparency across the organization • Task Boards, Graphical Representations, Burn-down Charts are examples of Information Radiators. • Should be designed in a way that enables readability and usability • Should be included as part of the agile process practiced for effective results October 2018 Agile with Scrum Information Radiators
  137. 137. 137October 2018 Agile with Scrum Information Radiators: Task Board
  138. 138. October 2018 Agile with Scrum 138
  139. 139. 139October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  140. 140. 140October 2018 Agile with Scrum Information Radiators: Task Board (cont’d)
  141. 141. 141 • Burndown chart is a plot of work remaining on the vertical axis and time on the horizontal axis. • Each point on the chart shows how much work is left to do at the end of that day. • Simple concept to see that the work remaining must reach zero by a defined date. • Trends indicate whether the team is working per plan or ahead or behind schedule and enables team to take timely action. October 2018 Agile with Scrum Burn Down Chart
  142. 142. 142October 2018 Agile with Scrum Burn Down Chart (cont’d)
  143. 143. 143 • Tracks progress towards project completion • Shows work to be delivered and completed work • Measure of work can be task hours / story points • Tracks when work has been added or removed • Tracks where work is being removed to meet fixed deadline • Distance between the two lines is the amount of work remaining October 2018 Agile with Scrum Burnup Chart
  144. 144. 144October 2018 Agile with Scrum Burnup Chart (cont’d)
  145. 145. 145 • Purpose is to demonstrate the product/work done in the sprint to PO and stakeholders and take feedback • Meeting typically conducted at the end of each Sprint and lasts between 1 to 2 hours • Formal meeting but conducted informally • Only completed items that meet Done criteria should be demonstrated • After the meeting, PO reviews sprint commitments, what has been completed that meets DONE criteria • Incomplete items if any are added back to Product Backlog • Feature changes, scope changes are updated to the Product Backlog October 2018 Agile with Scrum Sprint Review
  146. 146. 146 • Purpose is to discuss the good and bad experiences during the just concluded sprint, identify improvement items and owners • Enables the team to resolve problems faster and become more productive, efficient and self- managed • Meeting facilitated by Scrum Master and lasts 1 to 2 hours • PO also attends this meeting • Typically, discussion is focused on below three aspects ❖ What went well during the sprint cycle? ❖ What went wrong during the sprint cycle? ❖ What could we do differently to improve? ❖ Scrum Master takes lead in prioritizing action items and ensuring its implementation October 2018 Agile with Scrum Sprint Retrospective
  147. 147. 147 Scrum Adoption Module 9 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  148. 148. Reasons of Adoption October 2018 Agile with Scrum 148
  149. 149. Industries That Adopt Agile/Scrum October 2018 Agile with Scrum 149
  150. 150. Benefits of Adoption Agile with Scrum October 2018 150
  151. 151. Successful Criteria for Scrum October 2018 Agile with Scrum 151
  152. 152. Successful Criteria for Agile October 2018 Agile with Scrum 152
  153. 153. 153 Key Challenges Module 10 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  154. 154. 154 How difficult were the following issues to address during your Agile/Scrum Adoption? How important were the following issues to address during your Agile/Scrum Adoption? October 2018 Agile with Scrum Key Challenges
  155. 155. Key Challenges (cont’d) October 2018 Agile with Scrum 155
  156. 156. 156 Key Success Factors Module 11 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  157. 157. October 2018 ScrumAlliance: State of Scrum Report 157
  158. 158. Having Adoption Roadmap October 2018 Agile with Scrum 158 Readiness Check Education Pilot Implementation Reflect, Inspect & Adapt Scale Enterprise Wide
  159. 159. Do Rollout Your First Scrum Pilot Project 159October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  160. 160. 160 Kanban and TDD Framework Module 12 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  161. 161. Agile Frameworks 2018 Agile & Scrum 161 • Extreme Programming (XP) Type of software development intended to improve quality and responsiveness to evolving customer requirements. The principles includes feedback, assuming simplicity, and embracing change. • Feature-Driven Development (FDD) This iterative and incremental software development process blends industry best practices into one approach. There are five basic activities: develop overall model, build feature list, plan by feature, design by feature, and build by feature.
  162. 162. Agile Frameworks (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum 162 • Adaptive System Development (ASD) The idea that projects should always be in a state of continuous adaptation. It has a cycle of three repeating series: speculate, collaborate, and learn. • Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM) Is used for developing software and non-IT solutions. It addresses the common failures of IT projects, like going over budget, missing deadlines, and lack of user involvement. The eight principles: focus on the business need, deliver on time, collaborate, never compromise quality, build incrementally from firm foundations, develop iteratively, communicate continuously and clearly, and demonstrate control.
  163. 163. Agile Frameworks (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum 163 • Lean Software Development (LSD) Takes Lean manufacturing and Lean IT principles and applies them to software development. It can be characterized by seven principles: eliminate waste, amplify learning, decide as late as possible, deliver as fast as possible, empower the team, build integrity in, and see the whole. • Kanban Meaning “visual sign” or “card” in Japanese It promotes small, continuous changes to your current system. Its principles include: visualize the workflow, limit work in progress, manage and enhance the flow, make policies explicit, and continuously improve.
  164. 164. Agile Frameworks (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum 164 • Test-Driven Development (TDD) It relies on repetitive, short development cycles. First, a developer writes an (initially failing) automated test case for a new feature and quickly adds a test with the minimum amount of code to pass that test. Then, he/she refactors the new code to acceptable standards. • Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) A very structured method to help large businesses get started with adopting Agile. Based on Lean and Agile principles and tackles tough issues in big organizations, like architecture, integration, funding, and roles at scale. It has three levels: team, program, and portfolio.
  165. 165. Agile Frameworks (cont’d) 2018 Agile & Scrum 165 • Rapid Application Development (RAD) Its’ approach to software development puts more emphasis on development than planning tasks. It follows an incremental model, where each component is developed in parallel. The phases in RAD are: business modelling, data modelling, process modelling, application generation, and testing and turnover.
  166. 166. October 2018 Agile with Scrum 166
  167. 167. October 2018 Agile with Scrum 167
  168. 168. Scrum vs Kanban October 2018 Agile with Scrum 168
  169. 169. October 2018 Agile with Scrum 169
  170. 170. Test-Driven Development October 2018 Agile with Scrum 170
  171. 171. October 2018 Agile with Scrum 171
  172. 172. 172 Scrum Documentation Module 13 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  173. 173. What to Document? October 2018 Agile with Scrum 173 Product Backlog Sprint Planning Sprint Backlog Sprint Review Sprint Restrospective Burn-Up Chart Burn-Down Chart Release Planning Release Backlog
  174. 174. 174 Scrum Tools and Software Module 14 October 2018 Agile with Scrum
  175. 175. Recommended • OpenProject (Open Source; Agile, Scrum, Waterfall) • OrangeScrum (Open Source; Agile, Scrum, Kanban) • Taiga (Open Source; Agile, Scrum, Kanban) • JIRA (Agile, Scrum, Kanban) • Trello • Slack October 2018 Agile with Scrum 175
  176. 176. 176 Final Q & A Agile with Scrum
  177. 177. Thank You! Image: HappyJump 177October 2018 Agile with Scrum

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