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4 Ways to Reduce Penalties Under the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program

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Hospitals with high rates of hospital-acquired conditions face steep financial penalties if they can’t adhere to CMS’ new rule. But by following these four tips, hospitals will decrease their risk of penalty for HACs: (1) Proactively evaluate, measure, and optimize critical care processes and outcomes. (2) Put the right coding processes in place to accurately capture your patients’ POA data. (3) Apply what you’ve learned to create a culture of safety. (4) Consider active surveillance systems to identify HACs and potential patient harm.

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4 Ways to Reduce Penalties Under the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program

  1. 1. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary and Confidential © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.comProprietary and Confidential 4 Ways to Reduce Penalties Under the Hospital- Acquired Condition Reduction Program By Bobbi Brown & Michael Barton
  2. 2. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary and Confidential HAC Reduction Program Here are four tips to help you effectively implement a strategy that will decrease your risk of receiving penalties for high Hospital-Acquired Condition (HAC) rates
  3. 3. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary and Confidential Get Proactive! Proactively evaluate, measure, and optimize critical care processes and outcomes. Every system is perfectly designed to achieve exactly the results it gets.” - Don Berwick, MD
  4. 4. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary and Confidential Accuracy in Coding Put the right coding processes in place to accurately capture your patients’ POA (present on admission) data.
  5. 5. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary and Confidential Create a Culture of Safety Apply what you’ve learned to create a culture of safety. Review cases of HAC to discover the source of the problem. Then apply what you’ve learned to improve your systems of care delivery.
  6. 6. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary and Confidential Consider Active Surveillance Consider active surveillance systems to identify HACs and potential patient harm. Active systems enjoy much greater success, accuracy and speed in detecting HACs, and offers increased potential for prevention or harm mitigation.
  7. 7. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary and Confidential Do you have high rates of HACs at your hospital? What have you done to prevent them? Have you tried any of these solutions to reduce your HACs? If so, what were your results? Improving HAC Scores
  8. 8. © 2013 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Other Clinical Quality Improvement Resources Click to read additional information at www.healthcatalyst.com Bobbi Brown is Vice President of Financial Engagement for Health Catalyst, a data warehousing and analytics company based in Salt Lake City. Ms. Brown started her healthcare career at Intermountain Healthcare supporting clinical integration efforts before moving to Sutter Health and, later, Kaiser Permanente, where she served as Vice President of Financial Planning and Performance. Ms. Brown holds an MBA from the Thunderbird School of Global Management as well as a BA in Spanish and Education from Misericordia University. She regularly writes and teaches on finance- related healthcare topics. Michael Barton joined Health Catalyst as Vice President in January 2013. He completed his training at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center. Upon graduation in 1994, he was employed with the Pharmacoepidemiology Team, a multidisciplinary team of epidemiologists, infection control practitioners, quality control specialists, pharmacists, and healthcare IT specialists at the University of Utah. After four years, Michael moved his clinical practice to the Shock-Trauma ICU at LDS Hospital. Here, he had the opportunity to apply his infectious disease and critical care knowledge. After eight years of clinical practice in conjunction with five years of IT industry consulting experience, Michael joined HIT startup TheraDoc, Inc. as a consultant in 2000 and full-time in 2001. Michael spent 12 years with TheraDoc, where he served in various roles. The last 5 years Michael served on the senior leadership team as SVP, Knowledge and Product Development where Michael oversaw the Knowledge Management, Product Management, Engineering, and Quality teams. For Michael, joining Health Catalyst means continuing to pursue his passion of improving the quality and safety of patient care through applied healthcare IT solutions.

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