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Content strategy workshop

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Hands-on workshop led by Carrie Hane Dennison; Dina Lewis, CAE; and Hilary Marsh geared toward teaching participants to plan, create, and manage content to be found and used anywhere, on any device.

Organizations produce a lot of content and publish it across multiple channels, but does it have a purpose? Does it help meet strategic goals, increase customer value, or help the audience achieve their goals? With a content strategy, teams can:

articulate what content should be published and why
assess the content that exists already
create smart, actionable content in the future

This workshop covered the steps involved in creating a content strategy that works, and how to incorporate content strategy tactics and processes today.

With small group exercises and real-life examples and stories, participants left with ready-to-use ideas.

Publicado en: Marketing, Empresariales
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Content strategy workshop

  1. 1. Build Your
 Content Strategy
 Roadmap h"p://echa.europa.eu/addressing-­‐chemicals-­‐of-­‐concern/substances-­‐of-­‐poten8al-­‐concern/svhc-­‐roadmap-­‐to-­‐2020-­‐implementa8on  
  2. 2. h"p://echa.europa.eu/addressing-­‐chemicals-­‐of-­‐concern/substances-­‐of-­‐poten8al-­‐concern/svhc-­‐roadmap-­‐to-­‐2020-­‐implementa8on   Content Strategy Roadmap 1.  Discovery 2.  Content audit and assessment 3.  Comparative content analysis * 4.  Empathy-based audience personas * 5.  Content creation and publishing guidelines 6.  Roles, lifecycles, workflow, governance 7.  Taxonomy 8.  Content transformation and migration 9.  Content marketing and promotions 10.  Handoff, next steps * Sometimes considered optional
  3. 3. Introduction 
 to 
 Content Strategy
  4. 4. Content strategy challenges •  Findability •  Voice •  Ownership •  Policies •  Practices
  5. 5. Worst practices •  Language/jargon •  Prioritized promotion •  Content hoarding •  Bad editorial processes •  New content missing •  Different content on different channels
  6. 6. ©  Don  Graham,  1998,  Flickr  
  7. 7. •  Who, what, when, where, why, and how of publishing content online
 •  A strategic statement tying content to business goals 
 •  The people, processes, and power to execute that statement
  8. 8. Policies and guidelines + Audience understanding + Business knowledge =
  9. 9. 11  
  10. 10. What  is  “content”?  
  11. 11. Content is… Event Product Class Program Research
  12. 12. Format is less significant Web pages Blog posts Infographics Images PDFs Video Audio
  13. 13. Content is… Event Product Class Program Research
  14. 14. Content strategy is… Event Strategy Product Strategy Class Strategy Program Strategy Research Strategy
  15. 15. Content is political
  16. 16. Content is… Event Product Class Program Research
  17. 17. Content is… My Event My Product My Class My Program My Research
  18. 18. 20  
  19. 19. “Every pixel has an owner.” – Paul Ford, former web editor 
 at Harper’s magazine
  20. 20. “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, 
 when his salary depends upon 
 his not understanding it.” – Upton Sinclair, 1935
  21. 21. 23   h"p://www.amazon.com/Have-­‐Always-­‐Done-­‐That-­‐Way/dp/184728857X/  
  22. 22. Department Message Audience Department Message Audience Department Message Audience Department Message Audience Old thinking
  23. 23. Organization: Programs, offerings Audience Messages Audience Audience Audience New thinking
  24. 24. 26  
  25. 25. 27   Content strategy 
 is
 CHANGE MANAGEMENT  
  26. 26. 28   User experience 
 is
 CHANGE MANAGEMENT  
  27. 27. 29   Digital 
 is
 CHANGE MANAGEMENT  
  28. 28. •  290-­‐page  PDF   •  Updated  every  year  
  29. 29. •  Where  is  the  member  handbook?  
  30. 30. How do I do content strategy?
  31. 31. Where do I start?
  32. 32. Discovery h"p://www.amnh.org/exhibi8ons/permanent-­‐exhibi8ons/discovery-­‐room  
  33. 33. h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/emmm_weee/15048086753   h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/emmm_weee/15048086753   h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/emmm_weee/15048086753  
  34. 34. •    h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/studiocurve/13080208/   •  h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/moohcowh/2596366618  
  35. 35. h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/bunny/1985272127  
  36. 36. Where you’re going •  Goals  &  measures  of  success   1 4  2   5  3  
  37. 37. How you’ll get there •  Which  channels  will  help  you  achieve  success?   1   4  2   5  3  
  38. 38. How long and how much •  Deadline,  budget,  resources     (staff,  skills,  priori8es)   1   4  2   5  3
  39. 39. Who’s going with you •  Who is your audience? •  What do they want? 1   4  2   5  3  
  40. 40. What you’ll take •  What content do you have? •  What needs to be created? 1   4  2   53  
  41. 41. •  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cognizant-worldwide/15808428981 •  https://www.flickr.com/photos/pennstatelive/5415994846
  42. 42. h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/xoques/3758640007   Strategy Statement
  43. 43. The  <Organiza8on>’s  social  intranet  will:       Collect  and  surface/curate  cri8cal,  relevant  editorial  content  created  by   appropriate  <organiza8on>  corporate  departments,  divisions  and   employees.       Enable  and  mo8vate  employees  to  connect,  interact  and  collaborate  via   social  features.       Foster  a  culture  of  innova8on.  
  44. 44. We  will  develop  and  maintain  content  that  helps  people  prac8ce   and  enjoy  the  arts.  
  45. 45. NAMI.org  will  advance  the  NAMI  movement  by  recrui8ng  and   mo8va8ng  supporters  and  ambassadors  to:   –  educate  themselves  and  others  about  mental  illness  and   recovery   –  find  and  access  support   –  contribute  by  dona8ng,  walking,  engaging,  joining   –  take  ac8on  by  advoca8ng,  par8cipa8ng,  volunteering,  and   sharing  their  stories  
  46. 46. Create a strategy statement < O r g a n i z a t i o n > o f f e r s _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , _ _ _ _ _ _ _ c o n t e n t t h a t h e l p s t h e m _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ a n d _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ b y m a k i n g _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ f e e l _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , a n d _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , a n d c o n v i n c i n g t h e m t o _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ a n d _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ . adjec8ve   adjec8ve   accomplish  goal   accomplish  goal   audience   adjec8ve   adjec8ve  adjec8ve   take  desired  ac8on   Example   VillageReach  offers  educa-onal  but  warm,  human  content  that  helps  them  increase   dona-ons  and  raise  awareness  by  making  ins-tu-onal  donors  feel  commi6ed,   capable,  and  needed,  and  convincing  them  to  give  annually  and  show  public  support.   take  desired  ac8on  
  47. 47. Exercise #1:
 Create a strategy statement
  48. 48. Create a strategy statement < O r g a n i z a t i o n > o f f e r s _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , _ _ _ _ _ _ _ c o n t e n t t h a t h e l p s t h e m _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ a n d _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ b y m a k i n g _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ f e e l _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , a n d _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , a n d c o n v i n c i n g t h e m t o _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ a n d _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ . adjec8ve   adjec8ve   accomplish  goal   accomplish  goal   audience   adjec8ve   adjec8ve  adjec8ve   take  desired  ac8on   Example   VillageReach  offers  educa-onal  but  warm,  human  content  that  helps  them  increase   dona-ons  and  raise  awareness  by  making  ins-tu-onal  donors  feel  commi6ed,   capable,  and  needed,  and  convincing  them  to  give  annually  and  show  public  support.   take  desired  ac8on  
  49. 49. h"ps://www.flickr.com/photos/xoques/3758640007  
  50. 50. Content Audits and Assessments
  51. 51. Step 1: Content inventory
  52. 52. Things to track N a m e o f c o n t e n t p i e c e U R L C o n t e n t t y p e P e r s o n r e s p o n s i b l e N o t e s
  53. 53. Also track A v e r a g e m o n t h l y v i s i t s L a s t r e v i e w d a t e C M S c o n t e n t t y p e Tr a n s l a t i o n s
  54. 54. Step 2: Audit R e w r i t e , m e r g e , d e l e t e ? E x p a n d , t r i m ? G a p s P a t t e r n s
  55. 55. Outcomes •  C o n t e n t m a t r i x •  F i n d i n g s a n d r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s r e p o r t Do  not  skip!  
  56. 56. Comparative 
 Content 
 Analysis
  57. 57. Who? •  C o m p e t i t o r s •  P e e r s •  S i m i l a r o f f e r i n g s •  O t h e r i n d u s t r i e s •  S o c i a l n e t w o r k s
  58. 58. What to look at •  S e a r c h r e s u l t s •  U s a b i l i t y •  Vo c a b u l a r y •  C o n t e n t •  P r e s e n t a t i o n •  A u d i e n c e - c e n t r i c i t y •  Vo i c e a n d t o n e •  Q u a l i t y
  59. 59. Outcomes Comparative audit findings report   Formal report   Presentation   Scorecard spreadsheet   SWOT analysis
  60. 60. Break!
  61. 61. Empathy-Based Audience Personas
  62. 62. h"p://www.tagheuer.com/int-­‐en/company/ceo-­‐speech   •  Shared focus on the audience
 
 Shared understanding of the audience
  63. 63. h"p://www.tagheuer.com/int-­‐en/company/ceo-­‐speech   •  Shared focus on the audience
 •  Shared understanding of the audience
  64. 64. 73   h"p://www.slideshare.net/est3ban/empathybased-­‐personas-­‐gaining-­‐a-­‐deeper-­‐understanding-­‐of-­‐your-­‐audience-­‐presen  
  65. 65. 74   Anthony Susan Allen Maggie
  66. 66. Content Creation and Publishing Guidelines
  67. 67. Effective content •  Sounds like the organization •  Has a goal •  Uses the active voice •  Helps the reader do a task •  Is specific •  Is focused on the reader, NOT on your organization
  68. 68. Scannable content •  Uses subheads and bullets •  Is not in PDF format •  Uses fewer words but includes the terms readers are looking for
  69. 69. h"p://www.useit.com/eyetracking/  
  70. 70. Content is Conversation •  What do I hope to achieve from this content? •  Who am I talking to? •  What brings those people to my site 
 or app? What are their top tasks? Top questions? Conversations they want to start? •  Make sure your goals are specific, measurable, and focused on what you 
 want site visitors to do.
  71. 71. True goal •  NO - We want to tell people how great our services are. •  YES - We want people to choose our services.
  72. 72. True goal •  NO - We want to get lots of views of our page •  YES - We want people to do something: Sign up for the event, download the white paper, subscribe to the publication
  73. 73. Show, don’t tell
  74. 74. •  Useful •  Relevant •  Timely
  75. 75. •  Org- focused •  Narrow interest •  Not actionable
  76. 76. Message architecture •  Articulate your brand identity and personality •  Create a common understanding of who your organization is •  Informs decisions about what content to publish, what formats, what channels
  77. 77. Roles, Workflow, Lifecycle, Governance
  78. 78. Roles on a digital team •  Content strategist •  Project manager •  Visual designer •  User experience architect •  Social media manager •  Director
  79. 79. 92  h"p://www.ssireview.org/blog/entry/four_models_for_organizing_digital_work_part_two  
  80. 80. 93  h"p://www.ssireview.org/blog/entry/four_models_for_organizing_digital_work_part_two   http://www.ssireview.org/blog/entry/four_models_for_organizing_digital_work_part_two
  81. 81. Where most orgs start 94  
  82. 82. What often seems 
 most logical 95  
  83. 83. What some orgs are trying 96  
  84. 84. Where most orgs land 97  
  85. 85. Offering   online   content   Plalorm   (project  mgmt/ priori8za8on,   reliability)   Presenta8on   (self,  light,   medium,  deluxe)   Editorial  Ques8ons/   feedback   Promo8on  
  86. 86. Exercise #2:
 Create your governance model
  87. 87. 1.  Review the handout showing the four models of digital governance. 2.  On your own, think about where your organization is today. 3.  Then, circle the model you think would work most effectively in the organization. 4.  With the other people at your table, brainstorm what it would take to use the optimal model. Be prepared to share this list with the larger group.
  88. 88. Workflow
  89. 89. http://www.cnn.com/EVENTS/1996/anniversary/how.things.work/index2.html
  90. 90. Break!
  91. 91. Taxonomy
  92. 92. •  What Is It? –  A set of terms (controlled vocabulary) and content attributes (metadata) that can be applied to content items –  The underlying data structure of the website •  Why Use It? –  Helps describe and categorize content items –  Creates relationships among content items –  Helps make content items findable through navigation and search
  93. 93. Controlled  Vocabulary    
  94. 94. ≈   Library  of  Congress—www.loc.gov  
  95. 95. ≈   Search—www.acc.org  
  96. 96. Outcomes •  Agree  upon  controlled  vocabulary   •  Validate  with  users   •  Determine  who  will  tag  content  
  97. 97. Taxonomy Exercise
  98. 98. Content Transformation and Migration
  99. 99. Content Audit & Assessment Audit  spreadsheet:  h"p://goo.gl/G1DNx6  
  100. 100. Content Inventory
  101. 101. Image:  wikipedia   Transforming 
 Your 
 Content
  102. 102. “In a sense, content models are perhaps the truest form of bottom-up information architecture: by determining what types of chunks are important and how to link them, we make the answers embedded in our content ‘rise to the surface.’”
 —Louis Rosenfeld & Peter Morville Information Architecture for the World Wide Web
  103. 103. •  Structure—how content items will assemble –  e.g., news, author, location, price •  Type—how is it being used? –  e.g., press release for press room, author database for journal articles •  Attributes—published & metadata –  e.g., title, abstract, taxonomy tag http://alistapart.com/article/content-modelling-a-master-skill
  104. 104. Content Marketing and Promotions
  105. 105. Courtesy  of  Melissa  Zinder,  NBOA  
  106. 106. www.bobangus.com    
  107. 107. h"p://www.kaushik.net/avinash/smart-­‐analy8cs-­‐dashboard-­‐modules-­‐insighlul-­‐dimensions-­‐best-­‐metrics/   h"p://www.kaushik.net/avinash/digital-­‐dashboards-­‐strategic-­‐tac8cal-­‐best-­‐prac8ces-­‐8ps-­‐examples/    
  108. 108. 126  h"p://www.ssireview.org/blog/entry/four_models_for_organizing_digital_work_part_two   Handoff and Next Steps
  109. 109. #winning
  110. 110. Strategic nagging Patient but persistent repetition of a message
  111. 111. Have a plan
  112. 112. Don’t wait 
 for permission
  113. 113. Thank you! Carrie Hane Dennison carriehd@gmail.com @carriehd Dina Lewis, CAE dina@distilledlogic.net @dinalew Hilary Marsh hilary@contentcompany.biz@hilarymarsh
  114. 114. Resources •  http://www.customerfocuscalculator.com •  http://blog.siteimprove.com/web-governance-blog/the- hierarchy-of-content-needs-a-new-model-for-creating- and-assessing-content •  Letting Go of the Words, Ginny Redish •  Don’t Make Me Think, Steve Krug •  Web Analytics: An Hour A Day, Avinash Kaushik Handouts we used •  http://www.hilarymarsh.com/roadmap

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