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PLAY WITH YOUR
VOICE
PUBLIC SPEAKING
We require oxygen.
 In order to speak, you must breathe.
 Breathing deeply
 calms your nerves.
 helps you focus.
 imp...
The quality of your voice
impacts your message and
how you are perceived by the
audience.
Remember:
Consider your…
 VOLUME
 RATE
 PITCH
 PAUSES
We respond to change.
 Your audience will
react to any change.
 Make your change
purposeful by
understanding how
powerfu...
VOLUME
Be heard.
 You want to be
comfortably
heard by
everyone in the
audience.
Vary your volume.
 Speaking continuously at the same volume for
any period of time can put the audience to
sleep.
Varying volume can…
 Emphasize words or phrases.
 Mirror emotional content.
 What volume would be appropriate for telli...
RATE
Speak naturally.
 Aim for a comfortable rate of speech.
 Not too fast.
 Not too slow.
The Pros’ Rate
 One researcher analyzed a variety of 9 TED
talks to count their words per minute.
 He found the average ...
Rate is influenced by…
 Birth/culture/history
 Nervousness/stress increases rate.
 Write “SLOW DOWN” in your notes.
 M...
Fast or slow?
 Generally, slow is better than fast.
 Again, it’s most important to be comfortable
and CLEAR.
 Aim for c...
Fast or Slow?
 Change it up to add variety to your speech.
 Would you increase or decrease your rate to
convey:
 Confus...
Solicit Feedback
 Ask for feedback.
 It’s hard to grasp our own rate of speech. Ask an
audience member how you’re doing.
PITCH
We make music when we
speak.
 Pitch is defined as the notes we use in our
speech.
 Monotone is boring. Ask Ferris Buelle...
Activity: Playing with Pitch
 You’re about to receive two cards:
 One contains a quote.
 One holds an adjective.
 You ...
PAUSES
Pauses are golden. They…
 allow the audience to take in your words.
 communicate emotion. (Think back to Al
Gore.)
 con...
WHEN TO PAUSE
Before you start your speech.
 allows you to align everything physically,
mentally, and emotionally
 Oxygen calms nerves
The Clause Pause
 Wherever you’d see a comma in writing, use
short pause in speech.
 Wanting to impress my husband on ou...
The Point Pause
 Transition through parts of your speech using
longer pauses.
 Separate points
 Set apart a story
The Dramatic/Emphasis Pause
 When you want to emphasize a key word (or
phrase), try pausing immediately before and
immedi...
The (Rhetorical) Question
Pause
 If you ask your audience a question, give them
time to think about an answer.
 e.g. Hav...
The Speaker-Needs-Something
Pause
 We need to
 Think (use silence instead of filler words)
 Drink
 Check our notes
 I...
Works Cited
 Dlugan, Andrew. "Speech Pauses: 12 Techniques to
Speak Volumes with Your Silence." Six Minutes RSS.
Six Minu...
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Ps vocal variety

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Ps vocal variety

  1. 1. PLAY WITH YOUR VOICE PUBLIC SPEAKING
  2. 2. We require oxygen.  In order to speak, you must breathe.  Breathing deeply  calms your nerves.  helps you focus.  improves posture, which projects confidence.
  3. 3. The quality of your voice impacts your message and how you are perceived by the audience. Remember:
  4. 4. Consider your…  VOLUME  RATE  PITCH  PAUSES
  5. 5. We respond to change.  Your audience will react to any change.  Make your change purposeful by understanding how powerful your voice can be.
  6. 6. VOLUME
  7. 7. Be heard.  You want to be comfortably heard by everyone in the audience.
  8. 8. Vary your volume.  Speaking continuously at the same volume for any period of time can put the audience to sleep.
  9. 9. Varying volume can…  Emphasize words or phrases.  Mirror emotional content.  What volume would be appropriate for telling a sad story?
  10. 10. RATE
  11. 11. Speak naturally.  Aim for a comfortable rate of speech.  Not too fast.  Not too slow.
  12. 12. The Pros’ Rate  One researcher analyzed a variety of 9 TED talks to count their words per minute.  He found the average rate to be 133 to 188 words/minute (“What Is”).  Al Gore came in at 133 wpm.  Jacqueline Novogratz averaged 188 wpm.  Both speakers were comfortable and could speak with clarity at their rates.
  13. 13. Rate is influenced by…  Birth/culture/history  Nervousness/stress increases rate.  Write “SLOW DOWN” in your notes.  Mental fatigue slows us down.  We also tend to make more mistakes when tired.  Complexity of words/content.  Larger words, tougher concepts cause us to slow up.  Pauses  Your own, in the audience, in the speaking environment.
  14. 14. Fast or slow?  Generally, slow is better than fast.  Again, it’s most important to be comfortable and CLEAR.  Aim for clarity.  Work within your vocabulary.
  15. 15. Fast or Slow?  Change it up to add variety to your speech.  Would you increase or decrease your rate to convey:  Confusion  Excitement  Anger  Sadness  Frustration  Exhaustion
  16. 16. Solicit Feedback  Ask for feedback.  It’s hard to grasp our own rate of speech. Ask an audience member how you’re doing.
  17. 17. PITCH
  18. 18. We make music when we speak.  Pitch is defined as the notes we use in our speech.  Monotone is boring. Ask Ferris Bueller.  Use different notes to sound more interesting.  Pitch reflects your tone, your attitude.  Anger might lower pitch.  Excitement may increase pitch.
  19. 19. Activity: Playing with Pitch  You’re about to receive two cards:  One contains a quote.  One holds an adjective.  You will be asked to read your quote to the class in an attempt to communicate the emotion/tone on your other card.  The class will guess what emotion/tone you are attempting to project from a list on the board.
  20. 20. PAUSES
  21. 21. Pauses are golden. They…  allow the audience to take in your words.  communicate emotion. (Think back to Al Gore.)  control the pace of your delivery.  replace filler words.  allow you time to breathe.  give your mind time to catch up to your mouth.
  22. 22. WHEN TO PAUSE
  23. 23. Before you start your speech.  allows you to align everything physically, mentally, and emotionally  Oxygen calms nerves
  24. 24. The Clause Pause  Wherever you’d see a comma in writing, use short pause in speech.  Wanting to impress my husband on our anniversary [pause] I prepared eggs [pause] bacon [pause] and pancakes for breakfast.
  25. 25. The Point Pause  Transition through parts of your speech using longer pauses.  Separate points  Set apart a story
  26. 26. The Dramatic/Emphasis Pause  When you want to emphasize a key word (or phrase), try pausing immediately before and immediately that which you want to stand out.  The before pause tells an audience to listen up.  The after pause signals us to remember what was said.
  27. 27. The (Rhetorical) Question Pause  If you ask your audience a question, give them time to think about an answer.  e.g. Have you ever considered what it would be like if you took the time to ask more questions?  e.g. “Think for a moment about how you would feel if…”  Silent participation is important!  Failure to pause will frustrate your audience.
  28. 28. The Speaker-Needs-Something Pause  We need to  Think (use silence instead of filler words)  Drink  Check our notes  It’s OK! Take a second to collect yourself!
  29. 29. Works Cited  Dlugan, Andrew. "Speech Pauses: 12 Techniques to Speak Volumes with Your Silence." Six Minutes RSS. Six Minutes, 5 Nov. 2012. Web. 18 Feb. 2015. <http://sixminutes.dlugan.com/pause-speech/>.  Dlugan, Andrew. "Toastmasters Speech 6: Vocal Variety." Six Minutes RSS. Six Minutes, 27 Aug. 2013. Web. 18 Feb. 2015. <http://sixminutes.dlugan.com/toastmasters-speech-6- vocal-variety/>.  Dlugan, Andrew. "What Is the Average Speaking Rate?" Six Minutes RSS. Six Minutes, 12 Nov. 2012. Web. 18 Feb. 2015. <http://sixminutes.dlugan.com/speaking-rate/>.

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