Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.
The Experiences of University
Students Formerly in OOHC, and
Research Challenges to Current
Policy and Practice
Associatio...
Presentation Outline
PART 1: CONTEXT
50 years of research on education and OOHC
Overseas researchers on education and OOHC...
PART 1:
CONTEXT
Whether
Why
My
Might
work
50 Years of Research on Education & OOHC
Sonia Jackson, Claire Cameron and
Felicity Fletcher-Campbell
Judy Sebba & Nikki Luke
Graham Connelly
Robbie Gilligan
Ingri...
Judy Cashmore
Marina Paxman
Michelle Townsend
Elizabeth Fernandez
Nicole Peel
Jo Cavanagh
Marion De Lemos
Sarah Wise
Andre...
PART 2:
THE STUDY
Study Design
• Doctoral study
• Qualitative
• Research question
• Methodology
• Recruitment methods
• Research participants
Slipping Down Ladders and
Climbing Up Snakes?
All games have morals; and the game of Snakes
and Ladders captures, as no ot...
Overarching Findings
• Kiwi kids in Foster Care can and do go on to university;
some also graduate
• Being in Foster Care ...
Schooling & University
Early
readers
Gaps in
schooling
+ PS/IS
experiences
Success
by IS
Extra-
curricular
activities
Beha...
But…
One participant getting a prestigious
boarding school scholarship but…
One participant truanting from most of
her cla...
Fostering & Leaving Care
Educationally
rich
Supportive
final
Care to
Independence
Matches
Quality
Multiple
Limited
permane...
But…
One participant getting a
permanent foster care placement
but…
One participant realising that her
kin placement was b...
Family, Friends, Partners & Community
Family values
education
Friends at
High
School
Family
supports
education
Partners
su...
But…
One participant having a parent who
particularly valued education but…
One participant in and out of care
during his ...
Individuals
Feeling
cared
for
(Educ)
resilience
Different
future
Happy at
High School
Own
expectationsSerendipityGenerosit...
But…
One participant leaving school at 15
but…
One participant experiencing multiple
foster care placements but…
PART 3:
PRACTICE
IMPLICATIONS &
RESEARCH
CHALLENGES
EVIDENCE
POLICY
STRATEGY
PROGRAMS
MANAGEMENT
The Bigger Picture
POLICY STRATEGY PROGRAMS MANAGEMENT
Education
What formal and informal supports within TAFE/University
can be accessed?
Ho...
POLICY STRATEGY PROGRAMS MANAGEMENT
Foster Care & Leaving Care
How can the likelihood of TAFE/University graduation be
max...
POLICY STRATEGY PROGRAMS MANAGEMENT
Family, Friends, Partners & Community
How can children’s involvement in hobbies and
co...
POLICY STRATEGY PROGRAMS MANAGEMENT
Individuals
Do educationally resilient children also demonstrate
resiliency across oth...
Final Thought
• Having people who care about you
• Experiencing stability
• Being given high expectations
• Receiving enco...
Thanks You!
Contact details for further information,
and/or copy of presentation:
iain@mathesonassociates.co.nz
http://www...
Matheson I. (2015). Slipping down ladders and climbing up snakes: The experiences of university students formerly in OOHC,...
Matheson I. (2015). Slipping down ladders and climbing up snakes: The experiences of university students formerly in OOHC,...
Matheson I. (2015). Slipping down ladders and climbing up snakes: The experiences of university students formerly in OOHC,...
Matheson I. (2015). Slipping down ladders and climbing up snakes: The experiences of university students formerly in OOHC,...
Próxima SlideShare
Cargando en…5
×

Matheson I. (2015). Slipping down ladders and climbing up snakes: The experiences of university students formerly in OOHC, and research challenges to current policy and practice

510 visualizaciones

Publicado el

Education has the potential to make a substantial contribution towards improving the life-chances of the 50,000 children and young people in out-of-home care (OOHC) across Australia and New Zealand. Yet, most in OOHC face significant educational challenges, many do not receive a quality education, and exceptionally few go on to university. Making links with the growing body of Australasian and international research literature on the education of children in OOHC, this presentation reports on ‘Slipping down Ladders and Climbing up Snakes’ - a doctoral qualitative study that investigated the experiences of seven New Zealand university students who were formerly in foster care. The presentation particularly focuses upon the study's findings in relation to foster care and leaving care. While confirming that ‘Kiwi kids in care’ can and do go to university, the main barriers included limited educational support for those in foster care, mixed placement quality, multiple placements and a lack of permanency, challenging behaviour, being discharged from care at 17 and irrespective of whether schooling had been completed, generally poor and somewhat limited relationships with social workers, and limited financial support on leaving care from the national statutory child welfare agency Child, Youth and Family. Nonetheless, and despite the above, participants’ experiences also suggest the critical importance of at least one of their longer-term foster carers creating an educationally-rich environment, and formal support services for care leavers where they were available. Once at university, the majority did sometimes struggle, although there was usually some support from former foster carers, long-term partners, and in some instances parents. As well as examining the possible implications of the study, whether and how such studies can shape policy and practice is also discussed.

Publicado en: Educación
  • Inicia sesión para ver los comentarios

  • Sé el primero en recomendar esto

Matheson I. (2015). Slipping down ladders and climbing up snakes: The experiences of university students formerly in OOHC, and research challenges to current policy and practice

  1. 1. The Experiences of University Students Formerly in OOHC, and Research Challenges to Current Policy and Practice Association of Childrens Welfare Agencies Best Practice Forum Sydney, Australia 11 November 2015 Dr Iain Matheson
  2. 2. Presentation Outline PART 1: CONTEXT 50 years of research on education and OOHC Overseas researchers on education and OOHC Australasian researchers education and OOHC PART 2: STUDY Design Overarching findings Specific findings in relation to: (1) Schooling and university; (2) Foster care and leaving care; (3) Family friends, partners and community; and (4) Individuals. PART 3: PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS & RESEARCH CHALLENGES Evidence The bigger picture Questions on social work practice
  3. 3. PART 1: CONTEXT
  4. 4. Whether Why My Might work 50 Years of Research on Education & OOHC
  5. 5. Sonia Jackson, Claire Cameron and Felicity Fletcher-Campbell Judy Sebba & Nikki Luke Graham Connelly Robbie Gilligan Ingrid Höjer Bo Vinnerljung & Hilma Forsman Bob Flynn Mark Courtney Peter Pecora Andrea Zetlin Rami Benbenishty & Anat Zeira Overseas Researchers on the Education of Children in OOHC
  6. 6. Judy Cashmore Marina Paxman Michelle Townsend Elizabeth Fernandez Nicole Peel Jo Cavanagh Marion De Lemos Sarah Wise Andrew Harvey Trish McNamara CREATE Paul Testro Clare Tilbury Meegan Crawford Reeny Jurczyszyn Dee Michell ACT Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Alison Sutherland Iain Matheson Australasian Researchers on the Education of Children in OOHC
  7. 7. PART 2: THE STUDY
  8. 8. Study Design • Doctoral study • Qualitative • Research question • Methodology • Recruitment methods • Research participants
  9. 9. Slipping Down Ladders and Climbing Up Snakes? All games have morals; and the game of Snakes and Ladders captures, as no other activity can hope to do, the eternal truth that for every ladder you hope to climb, a snake is waiting just around the corner, and for every snake a ladder will compensate...but I found, very early in my life, that the game lacked one crucial dimension, that of ambiguity - because, as events are about to show, it is also possible to slither down a ladder and climb to triumph on the venom of a snake (Rushdie, 1981, p. 161).
  10. 10. Overarching Findings • Kiwi kids in Foster Care can and do go on to university; some also graduate • Being in Foster Care helped some participants get to university, but hindered others • Distinct patterns across experiences, but some similarities with others in Foster Care • Life in Foster Care is complex; some events had unintended consequences for participants
  11. 11. Schooling & University Early readers Gaps in schooling + PS/IS experiences Success by IS Extra- curricular activities Behaviour managed Few HS changes Quality final HS? Supportive HS Favourite subjects Local Uni. Professional degrees Ltd CYF support No Uni. Support 2nd Yr. scholarships
  12. 12. But… One participant getting a prestigious boarding school scholarship but… One participant truanting from most of her classes but…
  13. 13. Fostering & Leaving Care Educationally rich Supportive final Care to Independence Matches Quality Multiple Limited permanency Most social workers Discharged by 17 Flatting whilst at school No national advocacy No national aftercare
  14. 14. But… One participant getting a permanent foster care placement but… One participant realising that her kin placement was breaking down but…
  15. 15. Family, Friends, Partners & Community Family values education Friends at High School Family supports education Partners supportive Few long- term friends Limited siblings contact
  16. 16. But… One participant having a parent who particularly valued education but… One participant in and out of care during his primary school years but…
  17. 17. Individuals Feeling cared for (Educ) resilience Different future Happy at High School Own expectationsSerendipityGenerosity Loss/ change IsolationShameAdversity
  18. 18. But… One participant leaving school at 15 but… One participant experiencing multiple foster care placements but…
  19. 19. PART 3: PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS & RESEARCH CHALLENGES
  20. 20. EVIDENCE
  21. 21. POLICY STRATEGY PROGRAMS MANAGEMENT The Bigger Picture
  22. 22. POLICY STRATEGY PROGRAMS MANAGEMENT Education What formal and informal supports within TAFE/University can be accessed? How do you demonstrate that you value the education of children in OOHC? What can be done to encourage children’s sense of curiosity and development of a love of learning? If some educational success by early high school is important, what might need to be done differently by social workers and foster carers? What can be done to help ensure that children have a positive relationship with a member of school staff? If children are suspended or expelled from school, how can the negative impacts of this be mitigated? If a ‘good’ school is as important as a good placement, what are the practice implications of this? Do social workers and foster carers understand current high school education/school exams/TAFE/University processes? If stability during the latter high school years is critical, what steps might need to be taken to keep children in a school where they are settled and doing well? Who do children have to talk with about subject choices, TAFE/university courses, funding and careers? Value educationLoveoflearning Educational success Positive school relationships Suspended or expelled A‘good’school Understand education processes Stability Subject choices Supports within TAFE/University
  23. 23. POLICY STRATEGY PROGRAMS MANAGEMENT Foster Care & Leaving Care How can the likelihood of TAFE/University graduation be maximised? Do all foster carers value education and provide an educationally-rich environment? Can better and more timely out-of-school educational support be arranged for children in OOHC? Do care providers have a sufficiently high quality and quantity of foster carers, for schooling to be a significant part of the matching process? How can care leavers in education be supported to remain with their foster carers? What mix of formal and informal support can be offered to all care leavers? Educationally rich Formal and informal Quantity and quality of carers Maximise graduation Remain with foster carers Out-of-school support
  24. 24. POLICY STRATEGY PROGRAMS MANAGEMENT Family, Friends, Partners & Community How can children’s involvement in hobbies and community organisations be encouraged? Where children’s biological family value education, how might this be galvanised? How well are children’s friendships supported? Family valuing education Supportingchildren’s friendships Encouraging involvement in Community
  25. 25. POLICY STRATEGY PROGRAMS MANAGEMENT Individuals Do educationally resilient children also demonstrate resiliency across other areas of their life? Do children feel cared for and cared about by at least one adult? Do you understand, and get behind, the child’s hopes and dreams? How can children’s sense of belonging at school be strengthened? Hopes& Dreams Sense of belonging Resiliency Children feel cared for
  26. 26. Final Thought • Having people who care about you • Experiencing stability • Being given high expectations • Receiving encouragement and support • Being able to participate and achieve. In Celebrating Success (Happer, McCreadie, & Aldgate, 2006) five factors emerged as critical to the success of children in OOHC: “ “ ”
  27. 27. Thanks You! Contact details for further information, and/or copy of presentation: iain@mathesonassociates.co.nz http://www.mathesonassociates.co.nz

×