Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Se está descargando tu SlideShare. ×

Digital Literacy & Ignorance

Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Próximo SlideShare
Just Google it! [slides]
Just Google it! [slides]
Cargando en…3
×

Eche un vistazo a continuación

1 de 9 Anuncio

Más Contenido Relacionado

Presentaciones para usted (20)

Similares a Digital Literacy & Ignorance (20)

Anuncio

Más de Queen's University Belfast (11)

Más reciente (20)

Anuncio

Digital Literacy & Ignorance

  1. 1. Dr Ibrar Bhatt Lecturer in Education i.bhatt@qub.ac.uk ; @ibrar_bhatt Dr Alison MacKenzie Lecturer in Education a.mackenzie@qub.ac.uk Digital Literacy & Ignorance SRHE Annual Conference, Dec 2017
  2. 2. Literacy & the production of knowledge A social theory of Literacy The role of Literacy in knowledge production What a study of Literacy practices (of people, communities, etc.) can tell us about how the world is understood See the works of Brian Street, Harvey Graff, Deborah Brandt, David Barton, Mary Hamilton, and others.
  3. 3. Literacy & the cultivation of ignorance Section 11 – And it be it further enacted, That if any slave, negro, or free person of colour, or any white person, shall teach any other slave, negro, or free person of colour, to read or write either written or printed characters, the said free person of colour or slave shall be punished by fine and whipping, or fine or whipping at the discretion of the court; and if a white person so offending, he, she, or they shall be punished with fine, not exceeding five hundred dollars, and imprisonment in the common jail at the discretion of the court before whom said offender is tried. The Georgia Anti-Literacy Law, 1829 (in Williams 2014, p. 57)
  4. 4. Misinformation
  5. 5. Misinformation “While the benefits of our hyper-connected communication systems are undisputed, they could potentially enable the viral spread of information that is either intentionally or unintentionally misleading or provocative. Imagine a real- world example of shouting “fire!” in a crowded theatre. In a virtual equivalent, damage can be done by rapid spread of misinformation even when correct information follows quickly. Are there ways for generators and consumers of social media to develop an ethos of responsibility and healthy scepticism to mitigate the risk of digital wildfires?” (World Economic Forum Report 2013: p. 11)
  6. 6. Epistemic ignorance; epistemic harm? Algorithms are ways of not knowing; or, rather, constructing and sustaining ignorance Ignorance results from the configuration of interest Knowing that we do not know/not caring to know – not linked to present interests We do not know that we do not know – current interests/knowledge block such interests Willed/willful ignorance – they do not know and don’t want to know Types of ignorance as substantive epistemic practices
  7. 7. A current pilot study An investigation of undergraduate writing and digital literacy (previous work on assignment writing – see Bhatt 2017) Cross disciplinary: Humanities, [Computer] Science, and Business subjects Aims: How disciplinary knowledge is produced through writing (inc digital literacy); How the Web and other media are used for information gathering, managing and writing; How ignorance (of any type) is developed and sustained through practices of writing and digital literacy, and the networks in which those practices occur. Methods: Focused interviews, journaling, screen recording
  8. 8. Final points The study of digital and information literacy is intrinsically connected to the study of knowledge production, and therefore also to the production and sustenance of ignorance. Theories, frameworks, and research agendas surrounding digital and information literacy should take into account the potential for epistemic harm. What are the implications of ‘post-truthism’ for teaching around politically contentious issues like climate change? What are the challenges for the critical education of students from diverse backgrounds? How should universities develop the capacity of students to engage and critique information from contradictory sources? How does/can teaching in universities prepare graduates as critical knowledge producers and transmitters?
  9. 9. Bibliography: Bhatt, I. (2017) Assignments as controversies: digital literacy and writing in classroom practice, Routledge Research in Literacy O’Neil, C. (2016) Weapons of math destruction: How big data increases inequality and threatens democracy. New York: Crown. Williams, H. A. (2014) American Slavery: A Very Short Introduction. NY: OUP. World Economic Forum (2013) Digital wildfires in a hyperconnected world. Global Risks 2013: An Initiative of the Risk Response Network. Geneva. from http://reports.weforum.org/global-risks-2013/risk-case-1/digital-wildfires-in-a- hyperconnected-world/

Notas del editor

  • Signal ahead to AM’s part on

×