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Systems Engineering Update - Dr. Ron Sega

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Systems Engineering Update - Dr. Ron Sega

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Presentation delivered by Dr. Ron Sega, Director of Graduate Programs in Systems Engineering at Colorado State University, to INCOSE Colorado Front Range Chapter on Nov 21, 2013 and Dec 10, 2013.

Abstract:

A brief history of the evolution of systems engineering will be presented; reviewing its origins in the aerospace industry to the current applicability of systems engineering principles to contemporary, complex areas such as energy systems. Previous practical case-study experience in the civil space and government defense sectors will be outlined to provide a backdrop for the current systems engineering educational activities at Colorado State University where they are applying the systems engineering approach to various complex systems through graduate degree program offerings and increased research activities. A customer-driven Master of Engineering (M.E.) in Systems Engineering program and a Certificate of Completion program in Systems Engineering from the Fort Collins campus began in the Fall of 2008.

Presentation delivered by Dr. Ron Sega, Director of Graduate Programs in Systems Engineering at Colorado State University, to INCOSE Colorado Front Range Chapter on Nov 21, 2013 and Dec 10, 2013.

Abstract:

A brief history of the evolution of systems engineering will be presented; reviewing its origins in the aerospace industry to the current applicability of systems engineering principles to contemporary, complex areas such as energy systems. Previous practical case-study experience in the civil space and government defense sectors will be outlined to provide a backdrop for the current systems engineering educational activities at Colorado State University where they are applying the systems engineering approach to various complex systems through graduate degree program offerings and increased research activities. A customer-driven Master of Engineering (M.E.) in Systems Engineering program and a Certificate of Completion program in Systems Engineering from the Fort Collins campus began in the Fall of 2008.

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Systems Engineering Update - Dr. Ron Sega

  1. 1. Systems Engineering Update November 21, 2013 Presentation to International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Colorado Front Range Chapter Dr. Ron Sega Director, Graduate Programs in Systems Engineering Colorado State University
  2. 2. Overview  Background – Evolution of Systems Engineering  Example: Wake Shield Facility  Recent Government Experience: DDR&E and USecAF  Trends/Needs for Systems Engineering  Certificate of Completion, Master of Engineering (M.E.), Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Systems Engineering programs at CSU  Applications Beyond Aerospace (e.g. Energy, Cyber, etc.)  Discussion 2
  3. 3. Sputnik October 4, 1957
  4. 4. Yuri Gagarin
  5. 5. Mercury
  6. 6. Gemini
  7. 7. Apollo
  8. 8. Apollo-Soyuz
  9. 9. Discovery
  10. 10. STS-60 Space Shuttle Discovery 1994
  11. 11. Wake Shield Facility - “Systems Engineering” Case Study Objectives: 1. Create and Characterize an Ultra-Vacuum 2. Grow a Thin Film
  12. 12. Wake Shield Facility An Integrated System Source: J. A. Strozier, M. Sterling, J. A. Schultz, A. Ignatiev, Wake vacuum measurement and analysis for the wake shield facility free flying platform, VacuumVolume 64, Issue 2, , 27 November 2001, Pages 119-144. (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6TW444D2CDR-5/2/b18f908a6d747ac582ca59a9fc99aa5d)
  13. 13. Source: http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/gallery/photos/1996/high/KSC-96PC-2961.10.jpg
  14. 14. Source: http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/gallery/photos/1995/high/KSC-95PC-0969.jpg
  15. 15. Source: http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/missions/sts-60/sts-60-patch.jpg
  16. 16. Source: http://images.jsc.nasa.gov/luceneweb/fullimage.jsp? searchpage=true&keywords=wake&textsearch=Go&hitsperpage=5&pageno=3&photoId=STS060 -74-054
  17. 17. Source: http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-69/hires/sts069-723-072.jpg
  18. 18. Source: http://images.jsc.nasa.gov/luceneweb/fullimage.jsp? searchpage=true&keywords=wake&textsearch=Go&hitsperpage=5&pageno=2&p hotoId=STS060-54-018
  19. 19. Source: http://images.jsc.nasa.gov/lucene web/fullimage.jsp? searchpage=true&keywords=wake &textsearch=Go&hitsperpage=5&p ageno=3&photoId=STS060-57033
  20. 20. Source: http://images.jsc.nasa.gov/luceneweb /fullimage.jsp? searchpage=true&keywords=wake&t extsearch=Go&hitsperpage=5&page no=2&photoId=STS060-09-024
  21. 21. Source: http://spaceflight1.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-69/hires/sts069-732-048.jpg
  22. 22. Source: http://spaceflight1.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-69/hires/sts069-724-095.jpg
  23. 23. Systems Engineering Large Programs Discussion Ron Sega Woodward Professor of Systems Engineering Colorado State University (CSU)
  24. 24. Back-to-Basics and the Block Approach -“Systems Engineering” Case Study  Recognition of Systems Engineering Needs in Complex Systems – Director of Defense Research and Engineering (20012005) – Technology Readiness and Systems Assessments  Implementation of More Disciplined Space Systems Acquisition Strategy – Under Secretary of the Air Force (2005-2007) Executive Agent for Space – Back-to-Basics and the Block Approach • Applications to Energy and Other Complex Systems
  25. 25. Director of Defense Research and Engineering Department of Defense  Three Areas of Increased Emphasis – National Aerospace Initiative – Surveillance and Knowledge Systems – Energy and Power Technologies  Technical Systems Reviews – Technology Readiness and Assessments – Task Force support to Systems Development  Workforce Initiative – DUSD (Laboratories and Basic Sciences) – National Defense Education Program (NDEP)
  26. 26. National Aerospace Initiative (NAI) - Reference 2001 Plan NAI High Speed Hypersonics • Strategic Focus • Technical Coordination • Aerospace Workforce Space Access Space Technology DoD/NASA TCT/NPR Space Commission Reusable Launch Vehicle Expendable (Missiles) Reusable [Mach 0 - 12] Responsive Payloads 2nd Stage Rocket Engine Mach<4 4<Mach<15 Long-Range Strike [Mach 0-7] Air-Breathing 1st Stage (TSTO) [Mach 0 - 12] Space Maneuvering Vehicle Flexible Comm ISR Space Control Synergy Goal: 1 + 1 + 1 > 3
  27. 27. NASA X-43A - Successful Flight Test – March 27, 2004 Team Effort • 808 Engine Ground Tests • Numerous Unpowered aerodynamic tests • 40 Powered vehicle wind tunnel tests • Engine Gnd Tests (Mach 4.5–15) Results Achieved • Mach 7 • 10 Seconds Powered (Scramjet) Second Flight Test – Mach 10 29 NASA
  28. 28. Hypersonics -- X-51A - Latest Flight: May 1, 2013 -- Sustained Mach 5.1 Test Flight – May 26, 2010 30
  29. 29. Energy & Power Technologies… - Enabling a More Electric Force POWER GENERATION Fuel Cells & Fuel Reforming Novel Power • • • • ENERGY STORAGE Batteries Capacitors FUEL CELL Electric Warship s ed e rN e ow P • • Switching & Conditioning Power Transmission & Distribution Thermal Management Space Based Radar High Power Microwave POWER CONTROL AND DISTRIBUTION • More Electric Aircraft FY02 FY12 New Operational Capabilities Electric/Hybrid Weapons Warrior Hybrid/Electric Combat Vehicle 31
  30. 30. Under Secretary of the Air Force  Space – Department of Defense Executive Agent for Space – Back to Basics in Acquisition and the Block Approach • Systems Engineering • Workforce  Research and Development – Alignment with Needs and Redistribution of Risk – Stability in Basic Research  Energy – “Make Energy a Consideration in All We Do” – Energy Strategy (Supply and Demand – with Metrics)
  31. 31. Back to Basics in Acquisition Examples:  Four-stage process      System Production Systems Development Technology Development Science & Technology STP-R1 Streak XSS11 Reapportion Risk   Lower risk in Production Higher risk in S&T GPS-IIR-M TSAT
  32. 32. Acquisition Stages—Block Approach - GPS III Example IIIA System Production Systems Development Technology Development IIIC Block 2 Block 1 Block 3 Block 4 Cross Links Block 2 Spot Beam Block 3 Science & Clocks Technology Block 4 IIIB Block 3 Block 4 Block 5 Block 4 Block 5 Block 6 Block 5 Block 6 Block 7
  33. 33. Space Test Program-1 Launch
  34. 34. Tactical Satellite Experiment-2 (TacSat-2) Successful Launch, 16 Dec 06 Ground Terminal – China Lake Capability: • Field tasking/data downlink in same pass • One meter tactical imagery • Specific emitter ID & geolocation • Dynamic retasking • Autonomous tasking/checkout/on-orbit maintenance, on-board data processing • Total mission cost w/ launch ~$63M Notes: First Image, Pacific Ocean • First of TACSAT series on-orbit • Utilized the Minotaur launch vehicle • Launched from Wallops Island Facility • Successfully commanded spacecraft from China Lake ground station
  35. 35. Air Force Energy Strategy - Addressing Supply & Demand “Make Energy a Consideration in All We Do”  Accelerate development and use of “Alternative” sources     Synthetic Fuel for Aviation Renewable Energy for Installations Enhance energy efficiency -- aviation and infrastructure Promote a culture where Airmen conserve energy 37
  36. 36. Examples of Air Force Energy Initiatives in the United States Demonstrate H2 Production & Military Fuel Cell Vehicle Grand Forks AFB, ND Synthetic Fuels Research, Air Force Research Lab, WPAFB, OH Fuel Cell/Electric Warehouse Tractor Selfridge ANGB, MI 14MW Photovoltaic generation, Nellis AFB, NV B-52 SynFuel Flight Demo, Edwards AFB, CA Wind generation farm, FE Warren AFB, WY Low Speed Vehicles Shaw AFB, SC 122 KW Photovoltaic project, Luke AFB, AZ Waste energy and ice plant, Dyess AFB, TX Demonstration Sites Advanced Power Technology Office, Robins AFB, GA Air Force Energy Office, Tyndall AFB, FL Center of Excellence 38
  37. 37. Organizational Awards Received by the Air Force (2005-2007)  Green Power Partner of the Year Award - Department of Energy (DOE) / Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)  Climate Protection Award - Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)  Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award - United Nations Environmental Programme and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Presidential Award for Leadership in Federal Energy Management - To U.S. Air Force Energy Strategy Senior Focus Group  39
  38. 38. Systems Engineering  Trend toward increasing complexity of systems – Aerospace, Energy, Environment, Health Care, etc.  Needs of industry and government – National Surveys – Recent Colorado Industry and Government Survey  Systems Engineering education at CSU – Undergraduate emphasis on systems approach – Master of Engineering in Systems Engineering began Fall 2008 – M.S. and Ph.D. programs in Systems Engineering initially emphasize Energy Systems
  39. 39. Need for Systems Engineers - October 2009 Report 41
  40. 40. Technical Disciplines / Communities Needed for Secure Energy Solutions
  41. 41. STS-76 Space Shuttle Atlantis to Mir 1996
  42. 42. International Space Station
  43. 43. Concept for an Integrated National Secure Smart Grid “Test Bed” • • Best Practices • Security Models • Business Models • Benefits • Scaling Strategies • Policy/Regulatory Requirements • NREL DER Lab Standards R&D Opportunities InteGrid Lab Own-Operate Host Partners Universities and National Labs Design-Build Smart Grid Analytics and Training Center Tech Partners 50
  44. 44. Engines and Energy Conversion Lab  Distribution / Controls Technologies  Integrid Lab (CSU and Spirae) 51
  45. 45. The Institute’s Blueprint Rollout Event - September 30, 2008 in Fort Collins, Colorado  General James L. Jones, USMC (Ret.), President and CEO, Institute for 21st Century Energy, U.S. Chamber of Commerce  Wayne Allard, U.S. Senator (R-CO)  Renny Fagan, State Director, Office of U.S. Senator Ken Salazar (D-CO)  Robert McGrath, Deputy Laboratory Director for Science and Technology, National Renewable Energy Laboratory  Thomas Gendron, Chairman, CEO and President, Woodward  Ron Bills, CEO and Chairman, Envirofit International  Doug Henston, CEO, Solix Biofuels, Inc.  Ron Sega, Woodward Professor of Systems Engineering (CSU), and Vice President of Energy, Environment and Applied Research (CSURF) Above: Gen. James Jones and Dr. Ron Sega 52
  46. 46. Master of Engineering in Systems Engineering  Customer-driven program     Great survey response Working professional focus Aerospace & Energy Sectors Needs/Relevance Emphasis for Systems Engr Education   Flexible delivery modes (in-class, out-of-class, synchronous and/or asynchronous) National experts present case studies 53
  47. 47. On-going Master of Engineering in Systems Engineering Core courses: Foundations of Systems Engineering  Information Technology and Project Management  Overview of Systems Engineering Processes  Engineering Risk Analysis  Select 3 of 7:        Engineering Optimization: Method/Application Engineering Decision Support/Expert Systems Simulation Modeling and Experimentation Software Development Methodology Dynamics of Complex Engineering Systems Electrical Power Engineering Systems Engineering Architecture Electives:  With advisor approval, any 400 Level or above regular course credits course consistent with the student’s program of study. Capstone Course:  Group Study in Systems Engineering 54
  48. 48. M.S. and Ph.D. in Systems Engineering - Initial Emphasis in Energy Systems    Began Fall 2010 – approved for distance delivery 2012 Complimentary to the School of Global Environmental Sustainability Optimizing alignment with:       Faculty interests Global trends/needs Clean Energy Supercluster strengths in “Energy Systems” Collaboratory “Energy Systems” strengths Government Interests Industry partner interests 55
  49. 49. M.E., M.S. and Ph.D. in Systems Engineering M.E. M.S. Ph.D. Core Courses (12h) Choose 5 of 11 (15h) Choose 7 of 14 (21h) ENGR/ECE 501 ENGR/ECE 501 ENGR/ECE 501 ENGR/ECE 530 ENGR 510 ENGR 510 ENGR/ECE 531 ENGR 520 ENGR 520 CIS 600 ENGR/ECE 530 ENGR/ECE 530 Choose 3 of 7 (9h) ENGR/ECE 531 ENGR 510 ENGR/ECE 532 ENGR 520 CIS 610 ENGR/ECE 532 MECH 513 CIS 610 ENGR/ECE 565 MECH 513 ENGR/ECE 566 ENGR/ECE 565 ENGR/ECE 567 Electives (6h) 400-Level or Above 400-Level or Above Capstone Course (3h) ENGR 597 ENGR/ECE 531 ENGR/ECE 532 CIS 610 MECH 513 ENGR/ECE 565 – Electrical Power Engineering ENGR/ECE 566 – Energy Conversion for Electrical Power Systems ENGR/ECE 567 Electives: Plan A (6h) -orPlan B (12h) Thesis (Plan A - 9h) -orProject (Plan B - 3h) ENGR/ECE 567 – Systems Engineering Architecture ENGR/ECE 568 – Electrical Energy Generation Systems ENGR/ECE 621 – Energy Storage for Electric power Systems ENGR/ECE 622 – Energy Networks and Power Distribution Grids Additional Courses (18h) Dissertation (33h) 56
  50. 50. Systems Engineering - Enrollment Growth Estimates *Numbers reflect Admitted & Registered Students (non-admits are not reflected in these numbers) 19.7% increase in enrollment from Census Fall 2012 (FY 2013) to Spring 2013 Census (66 to 79 enrolled) Figure 2: Option B Growth Rate – Based on 66 enrolled students (see Table 2 for %)
  51. 51. Systems Engineering - Enrollment & Enquiry Status November 5, 2013  72 Certificates Granted  Master Degrees   Admitted 57 M.E. (7 on campus, 50 distance)   Conferred 17 M.E., 2 M.S. Admitted 27 M.S. (6 on campus, 27 distance) Ph.D. Degree    Admitted 34 Ph.D. (4 on campus, 30 distance) 25“In process” for Spring 2014 (0 have confirmed advisors) ENGR/ECE 501 Foundations of Systems Engineering  119 enrolled (Fall Semester 2013)  52 On-campus  67 Distance
  52. 52. Systems Engineering - South Metro Denver Initiative  The Systems Engineering program in Denver’s South Metro Region is part of a new initiative by Colorado State University and the CSU System to meet the needs of working professionals and the business community  Flexible, hybrid model of delivery   Onsite instruction and at a distance - synchronously and asynchronously The 4 core courses will be offered at a South Metro Denver site over the Spring and Fall semesters
  53. 53. Systems Engineering - Alternating Course Offerings Course Title CSU-Fort Collins South Metro Denver Site ENGR 501 Foundations of Systems Engineering Fall Spring ENGR 530 Overview of Systems Engineering Processes Spring Fall ENGR 531 Engineering Risk Analysis Spring Fall CIS 600 or MECH 501 Engineering Project and Program Management Fall Spring
  54. 54. Systems Engineering in South Metro Denver - Initial Course Offerings (Spring 2014)  ENGR 501 “Foundations of Systems Engineering” Thursday 5:15 - 8 p.m.  CH2M Hill (9191 South Jamaica Street Englewood, CO 80112-5946)  January 23, 2014 - May 15, 2014   MECH 501 “Engineering Project & Program Management” Wednesday 5:15 - 8 p.m.  CH2M Hill (9191 South Jamaica Street Englewood, CO 80112-5946)  January 22, 2014 - May 14, 2014 
  55. 55. Systems Engineering - Going Forward  Contact Information:        Director: Dr. Ron Sega Associate Director: Dr. Peter Young Initial Contact/Advisor: Tara Hancock sys_engr_info@engr.colostate.edu 970.491.7067 http ://www.online.colostate.edu/degrees/systems-engineering / Comments / Questions?
  56. 56. Concluding Thoughts “We owe our current prosperity, security, and good health to the investments of past generations, and we are obliged to renew those commitments in education, research, and innovation policies to ensure that the American people continue to benefit from the remarkable opportunities provided by the rapid development of the global economy and it’s not inconsiderable underpinning in science and technology.” Reference: Rising Above The Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future, National Academy of Sciences, 2005 63
  57. 57. Core Program Courses - 12 Credits  ENGR/ECE 501: Foundations of Systems Engineering Functional components of systems engineering, application of systems engineering to practical problems, system life-cycle process.  ENGR/ECE 531: Engineering Risk Analysis Estimation and risk identification, development of mitigation techniques.  ENGR/ECE 530: Overview of Systems Engineering Processes Systems engineering life-cycle process and analysis techniques. Reliability and robustness.  CIS 600: Information Technology and Project Management Strategic role in and management of information technology and software development projects.
  58. 58. Courses In Depth - Select 9 Credits  ENGR/MATH 510: Engineering Optimization, Method/Application Optimization methods; linear programming, network flows, integer programming, interior point methods, quadratic programming, engineering applications.  ENGR 520: Engineering Decision Support/Expert Systems Decision support systems for complex engineering problems; multicriteria decision making and optimization; hybrid knowledge-based/algorithmic methods.  MECH 513: Simulation Modeling and Experimentation Logic/analytic modeling in simulations. Event and transient entitybased simulation languages. Simulation design, experimentation and analysis.
  59. 59. Courses In Depth (Cont’d) - Select 9 Credits  CIS 610: Software Development Methodology Integrated extended enterprise planning and execution systems concepts including ERP, CRM, SCM, MRP II, business processes, front/back office systems.  ENGR/ECE 532: Dynamics of Complex Engineering Systems Higher-level behavior and issues that emerge from interaction between components in complex socio-technical systems.  ENGR/ECE 565: Electrical Power Engineering Analysis of power systems in terms of current, voltage, and active/reactive power. Introduction of computer-aided tools for power systems.  ENGR/ECE 567: Systems Engineering Architecture Observation/classification of systems architecture. Systems architecture principles and critical evaluation through design studies.
  60. 60. Electives and Group Study  Electives: Select 6 credits of 400 level or above regular course credits consistent with the student’s program of study.  ENGR 597: Group Study in Systems Engineering Capstone study experience in systems engineering.
  61. 61. Systems Engineering - Enrollment Trends Offered in Spring Offered in Fall Offered in Fall & Spring *CIS 600 ½ of total CIS 610 ½ of total
  62. 62. Systems Engineering - Class Enrollment Fall 2013 69
  63. 63. Systems Engineering: Smart Grid Systems Systems Engineering:  Complexity  Security  Reliability  Efficiency  Design  Management
  64. 64. Systems Engineering - Fields of Interest for PhD Students Energy 5% “Other” Includes: - Medical/Healthcare - UAS/Flight Operations - Civil Engineering
  65. 65. M.E., M.S. and Ph.D. in Systems Engineering - Need for the Program  2007 Industry survey – almost 700 responses (vast majority positive) within a month  Woodward pledged $1 million to support a systems engineering endowed professorship at CSU  Flexible delivery system attractive to traditional students and working professionals  CNNMoney ranks Systems Engineer as the #1 Best Job in America, in part because “Demand is soaring for systems engineers”  Projected total enrollment of 48 students within 5 years 72

Notas del editor

  • Thank you, Dan, for that kind introduction
    I’m delighted to be here today
    As the Under Secretary of the Air Force, I wear a couple of hats
    The last couple of days I’ve been down in Colorado Springs for the 23rd National Space Symposium as the Executive Agent for DoD Space
    The other hat I wear is the Air Force’s Senior Executive for Energy
    Finding alternative fuel sources and conserving energy is a good news story for the Air Force
    And I’m proud of what the AF is doing as we implement our energy strategy
    Today, I’ll give you a quick overview of our AF Energy Strategy and then give you a sense of where we’re going with respect to biofuels
    Let me show you why energy savings is so important to the AF
  • The design of the crew patch for NASA&apos;s STS-60 mission depicts the Space Shuttle Discovery&apos;s on-orbit configuration. The American and Russian flags symbolize the partnership of the two countries and their crew members taking flight into space together for the first time. The open payload bay contains: the Space Habitation Module (Spacehab), a commercial space laboratory for life and material science experiments; and a Getaway Special Bridge Assembly in the aft section carrying various experiments, both deployable and attached. A scientific experiment to create and measure an ultra-vacuum environment and perform semiconductor material science - the Wake Shield Facility - is shown on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) prior to deployment. Notes and Image: http://history.nasa.gov/SP-4225/imagery/patches/sts/p-sts60.htm
  • Five NASA astronauts and a Russian Cosmonaut take a break from training for their scheduled flight in space to pose for the traditional crew portrait. In the front (left to right) are Astronauts Kenneth S. Reightler Jr., and Charles F. Bolden Jr., pilot and commander, respectively. On middle row are Astronauts Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and N. Jan Davis, mission specialists. On back row are Astronaut Ronald M. Sega (left) and Russia&apos;s Sergei K. Krikalev, both mission specialists.
    Source: http://images.jsc.nasa.gov/index.html
  • Launch Complex 39 is in partial darkness as the Space Shuttle Discovery heads toward an eight-day mission in Earth orbit. Liftoff occurred as scheduled at 7:10 a.m., February 3, 1994.
    Source: http://images.jsc.nasa.gov/index.html
  • Thank you, Dan, for that kind introduction
    I’m delighted to be here today
    As the Under Secretary of the Air Force, I wear a couple of hats
    The last couple of days I’ve been down in Colorado Springs for the 23rd National Space Symposium as the Executive Agent for DoD Space
    The other hat I wear is the Air Force’s Senior Executive for Energy
    Finding alternative fuel sources and conserving energy is a good news story for the Air Force
    And I’m proud of what the AF is doing as we implement our energy strategy
    Today, I’ll give you a quick overview of our AF Energy Strategy and then give you a sense of where we’re going with respect to biofuels
    Let me show you why energy savings is so important to the AF
  • The National Aerospace Initiative (NAI) is a technology framework for transforming our nation’s aerospace capabilities. The NAI incorporates three areas: (1) Hypersonics, (2) Space Access, and (3) Space Technology.
    Hypersonics is motivated by time-critical targeting and the Nuclear Posture Review. Space Access is motivated by the joint NASA/AF requirements for responsive and reusable access to space. Space Technology is motivated by the implementation of the Space Commission recommendations.
    Synergistic benefits can be realized by integrating and working these three areas together.
  • 4-stage process
    Disciplined Approach – starting with requirements
    Increased System Engineering – people in the plant
    Develop standards
    Designs for testability
    Redistribute risk: take high risk early in the process and minimize risk as we approach production
    Produce space systems that work based in mature, proven technology
    Emerging technologies, not mature enough for production, get incorporated in to the next iteration or Block
    Workforce – people in the plant
    Cost Estimation – 80% in most cases
    At the end of the process, we produce Block 1
  • Bottom left – Evolved Launch Vehicle Secondary Payload Adapter: can mount 6 400-lb satellites
    This mission will validate this concept of innovatively saving the taxpayer’s money while at the same time increasing small satellite launch capability to the maximum potential
    Top left – night launch last week marked the 50th successful operational launch, which includes the 15th straight successful EELV launch
    What can we learn from this success?
    First, look at how we’ve come since our last launch mishaps in 1998
    The fixes – beefed up FFRDC support (around an additional 100 people)
    Emphasis on system engineering and integration
    Implemented a disciplined approach
    Many of the tenets we are employing to get space acquisitions back on track
    The picture on the right is a testament to the integration effort
    Send patch from the bottom represents the USAF’s 60th Anniversary
    I’d like to leave you with a story from our heritage
  • One of the first fruits from the Space Development and Test wing was the successful TacSat-2 Experimental launch on 16 Dec from Wallops Island
    S&amp;T effort: demonstrated dynamic tasking among other things at a cost of only $63M and launched within an 18 month development launch cycle
    S&amp;T efforts like this are important
    During my time as DDR&amp;E, funding for S&amp;T doubled during my tenure from 2001 – 2005
    Putting satellites on-orbit quickly and at low cost are tenants in our Operationally Responsive Space initiative
  • Another national security issue is energy consumption
    Energy consumption constitutes a supply and demand issue
    AF Strategy
    Improve supply by finding additional energy sources for Aviation and Installations
    Decrease demand by enhancing energy efficiency in both aviation and infrastructure
    Create a culture among our Airmen to conserve energy
    Supply
    For 2005 #1 purchaser of renewable energy n nation; #3 on planet
    FY04/05 Green Power Partnership Award
    2006 EPA Climate Protection Award
    Synthetic fuel – B-52 flight, talk about later
    Demand
    Replacing inefficient jet engines
    Second order effect: fewer refueling sorties
    Optimizing aircraft loading and routing
    Refining tactics, techniques, and procedures
    Culture
    Updating AF Policy Document on Energy Management
    Sept 2006: Letter to Airmen: Energy Conservation
    Sept 2006: VCSAF ltr – Energy Awareness Month
  • Dyess
    100% green power
    Developing Waste-to-Energy plant
    Lowest CONUS AF facility energy intensity (w/renewable credit)
    Nellis
    18 MW photovoltaic array (world&apos;s largest)
    Edwards
    Largest AF purchaser of green power
    Robins
    Advanced Power Technology fuel cell demo site
    Lowest facility energy intensity of AF Depots
    F E Warren
    Wind power generation site
    Luke
    370 KW photovoltaic membrane roof
    Hill
    1.3 MW generation from landfill gas
    APTO
    Mission: Lead, and Manage the identification, assessment, transition, and integration of Advanced Power technologies into the Warfighter’s Support Equipment, Vehicles, and BEAR base equipment
    Goal: Provide increased capabilities to the Warfighter; Support the AF’s environmental policy requirements; Reduce dependency on foreign energy sources with the insertion of Advanced Power Technology
    Focus Areas:
    Field multi-task capable equipment
    Reduce airlift and logistic support requirements
    Create joint advanced power initiatives
    Meet environmental policy requirements
    Share/transfer capabilities to Homeland Defense
    Provide dual use capability – Commercial/Military
    SHAW AFB:
    Shaw AFB: $100K Purchased 13 LSVs FY05
    AF will purchase $35M worth of LSVs FY07-FY11
    FY07 588 units/FY08-FY10 1365 units per year—will reach 30% or higher goal
    (LSV # Source: AF/A4RM, Vehicle Support Branch as well as VEMSO)
    Grand Forks AFB: Demonstrate H2 Production &amp; Military Fuel Cell Vehicle
    Goal: Facilitate USAF/CERL joint effort to develop a JP8 based field portable reformer with integrated dispensing system and a fuel cell forklift at Grand Forks AFB
    Milestones
    Evaluate JP-8 Supercritical Water Hydrogen Reformer
    Design Rapid Hydrogen Dispensing for Commercial/Military Applications
    Integrate Fuel Cell into HYSTER forklift
    Demonstration at Grand Forks AFB, ND
    Selfirdge ANGB: Selfridge ANGB H2 Fuel Cell/Electric Warehouse Tractor
    Goal: Facilitate USAF/NAC joint effort to demonstrate and validate the latest fuel efficient and environmentally compliant technologies for use in Air Force support equipment, Basic Expeditionary Airfield Resources (BEAR), and ground vehicle fleets and establish a Cold Region Demonstration Center
    Milestones
    Introduce fuel cell technology at Selfridge ANGB
    Develop and evaluate fuel cell powered vehicles
    Determine hydrogen infrastructure requirements
    Develop fuel cell maintenance requirements
    Establish model for future Air Force/Army procurement
  • Thank you, Dan, for that kind introduction
    I’m delighted to be here today
    As the Under Secretary of the Air Force, I wear a couple of hats
    The last couple of days I’ve been down in Colorado Springs for the 23rd National Space Symposium as the Executive Agent for DoD Space
    The other hat I wear is the Air Force’s Senior Executive for Energy
    Finding alternative fuel sources and conserving energy is a good news story for the Air Force
    And I’m proud of what the AF is doing as we implement our energy strategy
    Today, I’ll give you a quick overview of our AF Energy Strategy and then give you a sense of where we’re going with respect to biofuels
    Let me show you why energy savings is so important to the AF
  • The STS-76 crew patch depicts the Space Shuttle Atlantis and the Russian Space Station Mir as the two space ships prepare for a rendezvous and docking. The &quot;spirit of 76&quot;, an era of new beginnings, is represented by the Space Shuttle rising through the circle of 13 stars in the Betsy Ross flag. STS-76 begins a new period of international cooperation in space exploration with the Shuttle transport of a U.S. astronaut, Shannon Lucid, to Mir for extended joint space research.
    Notes: http://grcitc.grc.nasa.gov/stuff/patch/patch.cfm
    Image: http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/missions/sts-76/mission-sts-76.html
  • Source: c
  • Source: http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/missions/sts-76/images/images.html
  • 23 MARCH 1996 NM21-727-030 JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS MIR-21 VIEW OF ATLANTIS --- This view of the Space Shuttle Atlantis was taken by the two Mir-21 cosmonaut crew members onboard Russia&apos;s Mir Space Station, during rendezvous and docking operations on March 23, 1996. The Orbiter Docking System (ODS), the connective tunnel and the Spacehab module can be seen in Atlantis&apos; cargo bay.
    Source: http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/mirrors/images/images/pao/STS-76/
  • 23 MARCH 1996 STS076-713-083 JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS STS-76 VIEW OF MIR --- Backdropped against a massive array of clouds over the south Pacific Ocean and the Tasman Sea, Russias Mir Space Station is seen from the aft flight deck of the Space Shuttle Atlantis. The two spacecraft were in the process of making their third docking in Earth-orbit. With the subsequent delivery of astronaut Shannon W. Lucid to the Mir, the Mir-21 crew grew to three, as the mission specialist quickly becomes a cosmonaut guest researcher. She will spend approximately 140 days on Mir before returning to Earth.
    Source: http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/mirrors/images/images/pao/STS-76/
  • 22 - 31 MARCH 1996 STS076-401-009 JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS STS-76 ONBOARD VIEW --- This photo of the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Atlantis was taken from Russias Mir Space Station as the two spacecraft jointly orbited Earth in late March 1996. Earths horizon and clouds over the Indian Ocean form part of the backdrop for the scene. The large rectangular object in the immediate foreground is one of the solar array panels for Mir.
    Source: http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/mirrors/images/images/pao/STS-76/
  • Adjusted Fall 2012 text box so the graph could be cropped excluding the “legend”
  • Used Spring 2013 for ME (discrepancy needs to be addressed btwn Spring and Fall 2013 registered), used Fall 2013 census for MS and PhD. 34 Admitted and Registered
  • Enquires were from Contact tracking spreadsheet
  • Enquires were from Contact tracking spreadsheet
  • Enquires were from Contact tracking spreadsheet
  • Enquires were from Contact tracking spreadsheet
  • ENGR 567 Spring 2012 Enrollment (29, 27 completed)
  • 05/13/13 For Abt meeting slides 3 and 5 were used.
    PPTX were as of April 1
    May 10, 2013:
    PhD 35 in process with 9 advisors confirmed, 27 enquiries

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