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BACKGROUND THE	QUESTIONMETHOD TAKE	AWAY		 TAKE	AWAY	 IMPLICATIONS
Dissecting	Informed	Learning
A	Birds-Eye	View	of	Informa...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Teaching	Information	Literacy
Seven Faces of
Information L...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Conceptions	of	Information	Literacy
Phenomenography			
10	...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Conceptions	of	Information	Literacy
Phenomenography			
Out...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE	QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Faculty	Experiences
Describe how you use information in th...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE	QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Faculty	Experiences
Describe your approach to teaching stu...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE	QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Faculty	Experiences
When do you feel as if you have been s...
BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Themes	of	Expanded	Awareness
OVERLOAD
Managing the Informat...
BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Themes	of	Expanded	Awareness
ACCESSIBILITY
Navigating the ‘...
BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Themes	of	Expanded	Awareness
DIVERSITY
Utilizing various ty...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Teaching	Information	Literacy
CONSUMER		CONCEPTION
4
Devel...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Teaching	Information	Literacy
CONSUMER		CONCEPTION
CRITICA...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Provide	guides
Model	strategies
Scaffold	Instruction
Criti...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Facilitate	Discussion
Model	Fact-Checking
Peer	Review
Eval...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Deconstructing	
Arguments	&	Theories
Complementing	
textbo...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Assign		case	studies
Problem	Solving
Theory	Applications
S...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
The	Act	of	Learning
I'm reading and I forget that I'm read...
18
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
What will the students need to know?
What do the studen...
19
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Informed	Learning
Teach the Discourse in the Discipline...
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Informed	Learning
MISCONCEPTIONS?
21
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Questions?
TEACHING	
INFORMATION	
LITERACY
Behavioral
C...
22
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Further	Reading
TEACHING	
INFORMATION	
LITERACY
23
BACKGROUND TAKE	AWAY	 TAKE	AWAY	THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS
Further	Reading
References
Davis, J. R., & Arend, B. D....
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Dissecting informed learning: a birds - eye view of information literacy in first year college courses - Lorna Dawes

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Dissecting informed learning: a birds - eye view of information literacy in first year college courses - Lorna Dawes

  1. 1. BACKGROUND THE QUESTIONMETHOD TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY IMPLICATIONS Dissecting Informed Learning A Birds-Eye View of Information Literacy in First-Year College Courses Lorna Dawes| Assistant Professor | University of Nebraska| ldawes2@unl.edu
  2. 2. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Teaching Information Literacy Seven Faces of Information Literacy BRUCE (1998) Do We Speak the Same Language. COPE (2015) Faculty Perceptions of Student’s Information Literacy Competences. DUBICKI (2013) Is There an Information Literacy Gap to be Bridged? DACOSTA ( 2010) HOW DO FACULTY Experience TEACHING INFORMATION LITERACY THE PROBLEM
  3. 3. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Conceptions of Information Literacy Phenomenography 10 Female 14 Male 4 Professors. 4. Assoc. Prof. 4 Assist. Prof. 3 Assoc. POP 2 Assist. POP 3 Lecturers 1 Postdoc. 11 Science 5 Social Science 8 Humanities Years Teaching First-Year 3yrs-24 yrs. Years Teaching specific class 1yr-15yrs Experience a phenomenon
  4. 4. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Conceptions of Information Literacy Phenomenography Outcome Space Themes of Expanding Awareness Dimensions of Variation Conceptions of a phenomenon Teaching Information Literacy Categories of Description
  5. 5. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Faculty Experiences Describe how you use information in this first year class. Can you think of any key concepts or big ideas that you think your students struggle to understand in relation to information use in your class (Hofer, 2012). CONTENT
  6. 6. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Faculty Experiences Describe your approach to teaching students how to use information effectively in this course. Describe how you design your course to help students use information effectively. APPROACH
  7. 7. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Faculty Experiences When do you feel as if you have been successful in teaching students how to use information effectively in this class (Larson, 2007). How do you know when students have used information effectively in your course? PRODUCT
  8. 8. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Themes of Expanded Awareness OVERLOAD Managing the Information ‘glut’ o Finding information within the sources o Managing organized and un-organized information o Discipline information practices o Researcher information discovery 1
  9. 9. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Themes of Expanded Awareness ACCESSIBILITY Navigating the ‘flow’ of information. o Matching need to suitable sources o Discriminating and filtering o Discipline specific information practices o Accessing experiential information 2
  10. 10. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Themes of Expanded Awareness DIVERSITY Utilizing various types and formats of information. o Knowing the value of each different source in the discipline/course o Critically assign value to sources o Participating in the discipline discourse o Using a variety of sources to create new understandings 3
  11. 11. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Teaching Information Literacy CONSUMER CONCEPTION 4 Developing students who understand the varied nature of information, appreciate and evaluate the range and quality of the information and select to satisfy their needs at any particular time. DISCOURSE CONCEPTION Teaching students how to use information to participate in scholarly discussions and conversations through written, oral and visual contributions. BEHAVIORAL CHANGE PARTICIPATORY DISCOURSE VALUE ASSESSMENT CRITICAL SELECTION
  12. 12. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Teaching Information Literacy CONSUMER CONCEPTION CRITICAL SELECTION 4 Teaching to develop strategies that are varied and unique to specific information formats and research purposes. Teaching how to judge the relevance, credibility and authenticity of the information, in different contexts. VALUE ASSESSMENT DISCOURSE CONCEPTION Teaching how to analyze, and integrate information with personal research and contributions, using the information to communicate within a specific discourse community. Teaching how to use information to develop new understandings that change behavior or impact the society. BEHAVIORAL CHANGE PARTICIPATORY DISCOURSE
  13. 13. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Provide guides Model strategies Scaffold Instruction Critical Selection “But they can if I walk through. ‘What does a scientific paper look like? What are the pieces? What are the components of it? What are we looking for when we read through it? What can we get from this paper, even if we can't get all the details of the paper ?’” (Biological Science, Associate Professor.) “So, with undergrads…I do a combination at the beginning of semester of providing them with information. So, things like the textbook and a few videos at the beginning of the semester and maybe a few articles that I find that I think are really good examples of the topics that we're discussing… my goal is that they know where to find the kind of information that's important to them.” (Agricultural Science Associate Professor) “I think most students you know if it’s a video or something like that, no problem; they can find that on YouTube or whatever. But if you refer them to an article, or you refer them to something, boy they're completely lost.” (Veterinary Science, Assistant Professor of Practice). Overload Accessibility Diversity 5
  14. 14. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Facilitate Discussion Model Fact-Checking Peer Review Evaluating content in course textbook “ Students don’t understand that because the information is available it may not be useful or accurate, and understanding what is the important and relevant information within the sources, seems to be difficult for them to do Value Assessment “…one of the big parts of the class is helping them understand the difference between information that's derived from science and information that is not and to judge the quality of information that is derived from science based on how the science is conducted. How that knowledge may differ from sort of everyday conventional wisdom or religious beliefs or just beliefs in general values whatever..”(Agricultural Science Associate Professor) So, I do have students who have a bit of a hard time distinguishing…(like a press release…there's a lot of science blogs out there that are just reporting press releases) that which sounds scientific 'cause it often has the scientist giving quotes, and there are citations in there, in the papers, but they have a hard time distinguishing that from the primary paper. So, there's a mis-categorizing information.” (Life Science Associate Professor. Overload Diversity Accessibility 6
  15. 15. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Deconstructing Arguments & Theories Complementing textbook with relevant articles Stimulating questions Argumentative papers Background research- literature reviews “I'm trying to instill in the students a feel for what it means to be a scientist… a researcher. Somebody who reads what other people have done before them, and comes up with ideas from the results of the other people's research.” (Biological Science. Associate Professor) Participatory Discourse …they're starting to learn to see text as part of a larger conversation, and so a kind of an ecology of texts. You know, looking at text as belonging to the world in a certain context. (English, Lecturer) “So all of that to me involves information conversation, where and who has contributed to the conversation gathering, sometimes it involves understanding what you know, thinking about what, who else has tried to say something of these kinds of things in this moment. Who else has tried to raise these concerns with this audience in the past, and how they have done that right?”. (English, Associate Professor) Diversity Accessibility Overload 7
  16. 16. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Assign case studies Problem Solving Theory Applications Service Learning “…bridging the sociology discipline with your life experiences…” (Sociology, Research Associate Behavioral Change “…teaching students that all of these separate pieces of information that they get during the semester and all of the separate units are part of their 'palette of tools' to help them understand more holistically the world that they live in.” (Geography, Lecturer) Well I teach it that way because I don't want them going through life thinking that everything that they read on the internet and they read in the textbooks is absolutely true and they can’t just say "Alright I've taken biology class in 201 so I don't ever have to study biology again the rest of my life because I learned it, there's nothing more to learn." (Biochemistry, Full Professor). Accessibility Diversity Overload 8
  17. 17. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS The Act of Learning I'm reading and I forget that I'm reading a student paper. “… students come in with information that I wasn't aware of, or when students are able to add additional information, when they are able to contribute above and beyond what I had brought to the class.” They'll read something and instead of answering the question, they're starting to think of other things that it brings to mind. 9 I'm reading this but I'm reading this work and it's challenging and it's asking questions and its researching those questions and it's analyzing data research and I get lost in it…
  18. 18. 18 BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS What will the students need to know? What do the students need to do? How do the students need to think? How do students learn? How do I facilitate the learning? Informed Learning Davis, J. R., & Arend, B. D. (2013). Facilitating Seven Ways Of Learning: A Resource For More Purposeful, Effective, and Enjoyable College Teaching. What do the students need to do? How do the students need to think? How do students learn? How do I facilitate the learning?
  19. 19. 19 BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Informed Learning Teach the Discourse in the Disciplines: What researchers communicate, how they communicate and disseminate their information internally and externally. e.g.. How information is organized TeachHowtoEvaluatetheDiscourse: Understandhowpublicationsarereviewedandacceptedforpublication, purposeof differentformsof communication. e.g.Scholarlyvs.popular,bias,evaluatingtweets,blogs,articles, Teachhowtomaintaintheintegrityof thediscourse: Understandhowresearchstandardsaremaintainedinthediscipline community. e.g.Citationmanagement,definingandavoidingplagiarism, etc. Teaching “Information literacy is the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning” ACRL Framework. 2015.
  20. 20. BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Informed Learning MISCONCEPTIONS?
  21. 21. 21 BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Questions? TEACHING INFORMATION LITERACY Behavioral Change Participatory DiscourseValue Assessment Critical Selection Consumer Conception Discourse Conception Lorna M. Dawes Assistant Professor Liaison for Teaching, Learning and Teacher Education First-Year Experience & Learning Communities Liaison for Science Literacy. University Libraries University of Nebraska–Lincoln 402 472 4408 ldawes2@unl.edu
  22. 22. 22 BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Further Reading TEACHING INFORMATION LITERACY
  23. 23. 23 BACKGROUND TAKE AWAY TAKE AWAY THE QUESTIONMETHOD IMPLICATIONS Further Reading References Davis, J. R., & Arend, B. D. (2013). Facilitating Seven Ways Of Learning: A Resource For More Purposeful, Effective, And Enjoyable College Teaching. Stylus Publishing. Virginia. Badke, William. ( 2010). “Why Information Literacy Is Invisible.” Communications in Information LIteracy4 (2): 129–141. Bruce, C. (1998). “The Phenomenon of Information Literacy.” Higher Education Research & Development 17 (1): 25–43. Bruce, C., Hughes H and Somerville, M. (2012) Supporting Informed Learners in the Twenty-First Century. Library Trends 60(3):522-545. Cannon, A. (1994). Faculty Survey On Library Research Instruction. Research Quarterly, 33(4), 524–541. Cope, Jonathan, and Jesus E. Sanabria. 2014. “Do We Speak the Same Perceptions of Information Literacy.” Portal: Libraries and the Academy. 14(4):475-502. Dacosta, Jacqui Weetman. (2010). “Is There An Information Literacy Skills Gap To Be Bridged ? An Examination Of Faculty Perceptions And Activities Relating To Information Literacy In The United States And England.” College & Research Libraries 71(3), 203–222. Dubicki, Eleonora. (2013) Faculty Perceptions of Student’s Information Literacy Skills Competencies. Journal of Information Literacy 7(2) :97-125. Leckie, G. J., & Fullerton, A. (1999). Information Literacy In Science And Engineering Undergraduate Education : Faculty Attitudes And Pedagogical Practices. College And Research Libraries, 60(1), 9–29. Nilsen, Christina. (2012). “Faculty Perceptions Of Librarian-Led Information Literacy Instruction In Postsecondary Education.” World Library and Information Congress: 75th IFLA General Conference And Assembly. Helsinki, P1–25.

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