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Py 420 psychology after 9.11

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Py 420 psychology after 9.11

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  1. 1. The Psychological Impact of 9/11 2011 CAE National Security Colloquium Jarralynne Agee, PsyD Adjunct Professor University of Alabama, Birmingham Program Coordinator, JCCEO CSAPP 9/22/11
  2. 2. Psychological Impact of Trauma • Emotional • Mental • Intellectual • Psycho-Somatic
  3. 3. 9/11 Images • What we see
  4. 4. Emotional Memory • On our discussion board • Describe the images you remember most. • Discuss: − What you remember about that day − Physical details about the date or time − Mental details about information − Emotional memories about the day and event
  5. 5. The brain and traumatic images • The amygdala and pain
  6. 6. The brain and traumatic images • Emotional memory • Is emotional pain real • Images and emotion • Dealing with trauma − Individually − As a community − As a country
  7. 7. The brain and trauma • Emotional responses − Shock − Fear − Numb……..others? • Mental Response − Find meaning − “Trauma script” − Making meaning of the events • Intellectual response − Making meaning of the events
  8. 8. What influences us? Microsystem Mesosystem Macrosystem Exosystem
  9. 9. Social Ecosystem Mesosystem- A more generalized Microsystem- The most basic system, system referring to the interactional referring to an individual's most processes between multiple immediate environment (i.e., the microsystems (i. e., effects of spousal effects of personality characteristics relationships on parent-child on other family members). interactions). Ecosystem Exosystem- Settings on a more generalized level which affect Macrosystem- The most generalized indirectly, family interactions on the forces, affecting individuals and micro and meso levels (i. e., the family functioning (i.e., political, effects of parent's employment on cultural, economical, social). family interactions).
  10. 10. Brofenbenner’s eco-systemic theory
  11. 11. Processing the moment: How did the events on 9/11 impact the following? • Microsystem- An individual’s immediate environment • Mesosystem- System of interaction between multiple microsystems • Exosystem- Employment, travel etc. • Macrosystem- Cultural social and political forces
  12. 12. Post Traumatic Stress • What counts as trauma? • How close or far away to the event do you have to be to experience trauma? • Who are the people that are most susceptible to PTSD? • Can people cope, manage or heal?
  13. 13. Making meaning of what has happened? • What happens as a result of trauma? • Setbacks or carry forwards? • How does history get retold? • What have we learned that we can use in the future?

Notas del editor

  • The expression "Shock and Awe" was officially adopted to describe the opening strategy of the 2003 attack on Iraq. Although it didn't seem to impress Iraqis, it worked brilliantly in the 9-11 incident, where its creators couldn't claim credit for it. Not only did it provide the Bush administration a pretext to attack Afghanistan, it also provided the justification for virtually removing itself from accountability to the people, and empowering itself to arrest and detain anyone of its choosing. But arrest and detention have not been necessary to win most people's silent consent (or even vocal approval) for any action deemed necessary by the government in the War on Terror. The psychological trauma, together with the mass media's refusal to air the difficult questions, has proven quite sufficient.
  • New York City Handout
  • The amygdala and persistent pain byDrevets WCNeugebauer V, Li W, Bird GC, Han JS.Department of Anatomy & Neurosciences,University of Texas Medical Branch,Galveston, 77555-1069, USA.voneugeb@utmb.edu Neuroscientist. 2004 Jun;10(3):221-34. ABSTRACTA reciprocal relationship exists between persistent pain and negative affective states such as fear, anxiety, and depression. Accumulating evidence points to the amygdala as an important site of such interaction. Whereas a key role of the amygdala in the neuronal mechanisms of emotionality and affective disorders has been well established, the concept of the amygdala as an important contributor to pain and its emotional component is still emerging. This article will review and discuss evidence from anatomical, neuroimaging, behavioral, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical data that implicate the amygdala in pain modulation and emotional responses to pain. The latero-capsular division of the central nucleus of the amygdala is now defined as the "nociceptive amygdala" and integrates nociceptive information with poly-modal information about the internal and external bodily environment. Dependent on environmental conditions and affective states, the amygdala appears to play a dual facilitatory and inhibitory role in the modulation of pain behavior and nociceptive processing at different levels of the pain neuraxis. Only recently, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical neuroplastic changes were shown in the nociceptive amygdala in persistent pain. It is conceivable, however, that amygdala plasticity plays an important role in emotional pain behavior and its modulation by affective state.
  • The amygdala and persistent pain byDrevets WCNeugebauer V, Li W, Bird GC, Han JS.Department of Anatomy & Neurosciences,University of Texas Medical Branch,Galveston, 77555-1069, USA.voneugeb@utmb.edu Neuroscientist. 2004 Jun;10(3):221-34. ABSTRACTA reciprocal relationship exists between persistent pain and negative affective states such as fear, anxiety, and depression. Accumulating evidence points to the amygdala as an important site of such interaction. Whereas a key role of the amygdala in the neuronal mechanisms of emotionality and affective disorders has been well established, the concept of the amygdala as an important contributor to pain and its emotional component is still emerging. This article will review and discuss evidence from anatomical, neuroimaging, behavioral, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical data that implicate the amygdala in pain modulation and emotional responses to pain. The latero-capsular division of the central nucleus of the amygdala is now defined as the "nociceptive amygdala" and integrates nociceptive information with poly-modal information about the internal and external bodily environment. Dependent on environmental conditions and affective states, the amygdala appears to play a dual facilitatory and inhibitory role in the modulation of pain behavior and nociceptive processing at different levels of the pain neuraxis. Only recently, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical neuroplastic changes were shown in the nociceptive amygdala in persistent pain. It is conceivable, however, that amygdala plasticity plays an important role in emotional pain behavior and its modulation by affective state.
  • EcosystemMicrosystem- The most basic system, referring to an individual's most immediate environment (i.e., the effects of personality characteristics on other family members).Mesosystem- A more generalized system referring to the interactional processes between multiple microsystems (i. e., effects of spousal relationships on parent-child interactions).Exosystem- Settings on a more generalized level which affect indirectly, family interactions on the micro and meso levels (i. e., the effects of parent's employment on family interactions).Macrosystem- The most generalized forces, affecting individuals and family functioning (i.e., political, cultural, economical, social).
  • Transcripción

    1. 1. The Psychological Impact of 9/11 2011 CAE National Security Colloquium Jarralynne Agee, PsyD Adjunct Professor University of Alabama, Birmingham Program Coordinator, JCCEO CSAPP 9/22/11
    2. 2. Psychological Impact of Trauma • Emotional • Mental • Intellectual • Psycho-Somatic
    3. 3. 9/11 Images • What we see
    4. 4. Emotional Memory • On our discussion board • Describe the images you remember most. • Discuss: − What you remember about that day − Physical details about the date or time − Mental details about information − Emotional memories about the day and event
    5. 5. The brain and traumatic images • The amygdala and pain
    6. 6. The brain and traumatic images • Emotional memory • Is emotional pain real • Images and emotion • Dealing with trauma − Individually − As a community − As a country
    7. 7. The brain and trauma • Emotional responses − Shock − Fear − Numb……..others? • Mental Response − Find meaning − “Trauma script” − Making meaning of the events • Intellectual response − Making meaning of the events
    8. 8. What influences us? Microsystem Mesosystem Macrosystem Exosystem
    9. 9. Social Ecosystem Mesosystem- A more generalized Microsystem- The most basic system, system referring to the interactional referring to an individual's most processes between multiple immediate environment (i.e., the microsystems (i. e., effects of spousal effects of personality characteristics relationships on parent-child on other family members). interactions). Ecosystem Exosystem- Settings on a more generalized level which affect Macrosystem- The most generalized indirectly, family interactions on the forces, affecting individuals and micro and meso levels (i. e., the family functioning (i.e., political, effects of parent's employment on cultural, economical, social). family interactions).
    10. 10. Brofenbenner’s eco-systemic theory
    11. 11. Processing the moment: How did the events on 9/11 impact the following? • Microsystem- An individual’s immediate environment • Mesosystem- System of interaction between multiple microsystems • Exosystem- Employment, travel etc. • Macrosystem- Cultural social and political forces
    12. 12. Post Traumatic Stress • What counts as trauma? • How close or far away to the event do you have to be to experience trauma? • Who are the people that are most susceptible to PTSD? • Can people cope, manage or heal?
    13. 13. Making meaning of what has happened? • What happens as a result of trauma? • Setbacks or carry forwards? • How does history get retold? • What have we learned that we can use in the future?

    Notas del editor

  • The expression "Shock and Awe" was officially adopted to describe the opening strategy of the 2003 attack on Iraq. Although it didn't seem to impress Iraqis, it worked brilliantly in the 9-11 incident, where its creators couldn't claim credit for it. Not only did it provide the Bush administration a pretext to attack Afghanistan, it also provided the justification for virtually removing itself from accountability to the people, and empowering itself to arrest and detain anyone of its choosing. But arrest and detention have not been necessary to win most people's silent consent (or even vocal approval) for any action deemed necessary by the government in the War on Terror. The psychological trauma, together with the mass media's refusal to air the difficult questions, has proven quite sufficient.
  • New York City Handout
  • The amygdala and persistent pain byDrevets WCNeugebauer V, Li W, Bird GC, Han JS.Department of Anatomy & Neurosciences,University of Texas Medical Branch,Galveston, 77555-1069, USA.voneugeb@utmb.edu Neuroscientist. 2004 Jun;10(3):221-34. ABSTRACTA reciprocal relationship exists between persistent pain and negative affective states such as fear, anxiety, and depression. Accumulating evidence points to the amygdala as an important site of such interaction. Whereas a key role of the amygdala in the neuronal mechanisms of emotionality and affective disorders has been well established, the concept of the amygdala as an important contributor to pain and its emotional component is still emerging. This article will review and discuss evidence from anatomical, neuroimaging, behavioral, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical data that implicate the amygdala in pain modulation and emotional responses to pain. The latero-capsular division of the central nucleus of the amygdala is now defined as the "nociceptive amygdala" and integrates nociceptive information with poly-modal information about the internal and external bodily environment. Dependent on environmental conditions and affective states, the amygdala appears to play a dual facilitatory and inhibitory role in the modulation of pain behavior and nociceptive processing at different levels of the pain neuraxis. Only recently, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical neuroplastic changes were shown in the nociceptive amygdala in persistent pain. It is conceivable, however, that amygdala plasticity plays an important role in emotional pain behavior and its modulation by affective state.
  • The amygdala and persistent pain byDrevets WCNeugebauer V, Li W, Bird GC, Han JS.Department of Anatomy & Neurosciences,University of Texas Medical Branch,Galveston, 77555-1069, USA.voneugeb@utmb.edu Neuroscientist. 2004 Jun;10(3):221-34. ABSTRACTA reciprocal relationship exists between persistent pain and negative affective states such as fear, anxiety, and depression. Accumulating evidence points to the amygdala as an important site of such interaction. Whereas a key role of the amygdala in the neuronal mechanisms of emotionality and affective disorders has been well established, the concept of the amygdala as an important contributor to pain and its emotional component is still emerging. This article will review and discuss evidence from anatomical, neuroimaging, behavioral, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical data that implicate the amygdala in pain modulation and emotional responses to pain. The latero-capsular division of the central nucleus of the amygdala is now defined as the "nociceptive amygdala" and integrates nociceptive information with poly-modal information about the internal and external bodily environment. Dependent on environmental conditions and affective states, the amygdala appears to play a dual facilitatory and inhibitory role in the modulation of pain behavior and nociceptive processing at different levels of the pain neuraxis. Only recently, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical neuroplastic changes were shown in the nociceptive amygdala in persistent pain. It is conceivable, however, that amygdala plasticity plays an important role in emotional pain behavior and its modulation by affective state.
  • EcosystemMicrosystem- The most basic system, referring to an individual's most immediate environment (i.e., the effects of personality characteristics on other family members).Mesosystem- A more generalized system referring to the interactional processes between multiple microsystems (i. e., effects of spousal relationships on parent-child interactions).Exosystem- Settings on a more generalized level which affect indirectly, family interactions on the micro and meso levels (i. e., the effects of parent's employment on family interactions).Macrosystem- The most generalized forces, affecting individuals and family functioning (i.e., political, cultural, economical, social).
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