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Accessible Moodle - UCL Education conference 2018

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Accessible Moodle - UCL Education conference 2018

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Angel Perez and Jessica Gramp preset about the UCL Accessible Moodle project. More info at: http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/digital-education/category/accessibility/accessible-moodle-project/

Angel Perez and Jessica Gramp preset about the UCL Accessible Moodle project. More info at: http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/digital-education/category/accessibility/accessible-moodle-project/

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Accessible Moodle - UCL Education conference 2018

  1. 1. Angel Perez (Student Disability Advisor) angel.perez@ucl.ac.uk Jessica Gramp (Digital Education Advisor) j.gramp@ucl.ac.uk UCL Education Conference 2018 Making Moodle more accessible for disabled staff and students
  2. 2. Introduction - Disability at UCL - Accessible Moodle project: - Disabled Student Portal - Accessible Moodle theme - Accessible Teaching Practices: UDL course - Quiz and feedback.
  3. 3. Disability in Higher Education • The Equality Act 2010 legally protects people from discrimination in the workplace and in wider society. • You’re disabled under the Equality Act 2010 if you have a physical or mental impairment that has a ‘substantial’ and ‘long-term’ negative effect on your ability to do normal daily activities. • Our duty to take proportionate action to remedy discrimination and disadvantage affecting particular groups • The Act also includes a duty to make reasonable adjustments and this duty is ‘anticipatory’.
  4. 4. Disability at UCL Approx. 3000 students with a range of disabilities including: • Mobility Impairments. • Sensory Impairments. • Specific Learning Difficulties. • Mental Health difficulties. • Autistic Spectrum Disorders. • Long Term/Chronic Medical Conditions.
  5. 5. How accessible is UCL? • Student Support and Wellbeing Services • Summary of Reasonable Adjustments (SORA). • Special Exam Arrangements. • Assistive Technology available at UCL Computer Network. • SENIT Room at UCL. • 2016 Accessibility Survey. What is missing? • First-hand account from students. • Lecturers often reported that they didn't know how to make content accessible. • Lack of information available to staff regarding accessibility practices.
  6. 6. Accessible Moodle Project • Small project to improve accessibility of Moodle. • Focus groups with disabled students and staff. • Specialist disability consultants helped us develop recommendations. • Important not to favour one disability over another – supplement with advice for how to use adaptive technologies for specific impairments. • Many of the concerns raised are around general usability that cause additional problems for those with disabilities. • A new theme solves many of the issues raised. • Making Moodle more accessible for people with disabilities will improve usability for all!
  7. 7. Which disabilities did we consider? There are four broad areas that are covered by a number of disability charities (AbilityNet): • Hearing: Auditory Disability (deafness). • Vision: Blindness and Visual impairment. • Cognitive: Cognitive and Neurological Disability (Dyslexia, Autism etc.). • Motor: Physical Disability.
  8. 8. Ten main areas of accessibility concern 1. Clutter - difficult to find information amongst irrelevant links and content. 2. Emphasis – difficult to understand what is the most important information. 3. Layout - page elements are not configurable, there is too much visible at once and the blocks are too wide. 4. Navigation and Orientation - long, disorganised pages, with links to external services not being signposted. 5. Usability - some interfaces, especially for assessments, are particularly difficult to use. 6. Awareness - useful features (skip links) & services (Moodle snapshot) remain unknown. 7. Personalisation - a lack of configurable page elements (blocks, fonts, font sizes and colours) or information about how to do this independently with browser plugins and other assistive technologies. 8. Text - Problems reading text that is overly long, too small, in a difficult to read font with poor contrast and in difficult formats both in Moodle and the resources it contains. 9. Consistency - inconsistencies between Moodle courses and conversely some courses not being adequately distinguishable from others. 10. Graphics - heavy reliance of written information that could be expressed more simply with icons and images, with appropriate alternative text for those using screen readers.
  9. 9. Accessible Moodle theme • Alerts (closed by individuals) 2, 7. • Simplified menus 1, 3, 4. • Scrolling announcements (pausable) 5. • Larger text 8. • Icons (alongside text) 10. • Grey background (helps Dyslexia) 8. • Accessibility statement / help 6, 7. • Visible tabbing through elements 2, 4, 6. n Numbers indicate mapping to area of concern listed in previous slide.
  10. 10. Accessible Moodle theme • Dockable blocks 1, 3, 4. • Hide / show blocks 1, 2, 3. • Full screen toggle 3. • Customised help depending on role 1, 7. • Wider spacing between elements 3, 8. • Simplified design 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. • More & larger icons 10. • ‘This course’ menu links to people, grades, activities 1, 2, 4, 5, 6. • Blue theme selected (more accessible for visual impairments) 5, 8. n Numbers indicate mapping to area of concern listed in previous slide.
  11. 11. Multifaceted approach Accessible Moodle Theme Disabled Student Portal Accessible Teaching Practices Course
  12. 12. Disabled Student Portal
  13. 13. Accessible Teaching Practices: Universal Design for Learning (UDL) course • A platform for lecturers to learn how to make their modules more accessible. • Raise awareness of how disabled students learn. • Accessibility benefits all, not only disabled students. • Work with UDL principles to create accessible environments. • A resource centre with tools, strategies and guides.
  14. 14. Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
  15. 15. Accessible Teaching Practices: Universal Design for Learning (UDL) course Different learning techniques help staff better understand disabilities and how they can support them: • Personas – help staff identify with and understand some of the challenges disabled students may face. • Simulations – help staff to better understand how students may experience certain disabilities. • Case studies – help staff consider what they can do to make things easier for students with particular disabilities.
  16. 16. Accessible Teaching course: personas • Anna is 20 and studying a BA in Art History. • She has moderate dyslexia, which affects her ability to read, spell and use numbers. • She modifies web pages to use brown text on sepia backgrounds to help her read. • Even then, some websites are too difficult and distracting for her to read.
  17. 17. • Course participants can get some idea of how disability affects people via the simulations. http://geon.github.io/programming/2016/03/03/dsxyliea Accessible Teaching course: simulations
  18. 18. Anna’s tutor has given her a photocopied chapter of a book to read. The quality of the photocopying is not very good and the font is very small. She finds it really difficult to read this type of documents as they require a lot of concentration. What could her tutor have done to facilitate learning? a. Give her a different text to read. b. Contact the publisher to ask for an accessible copy of the chapter. c. Suggest Anna to print the chapter in a larger format. d. Convert the text to an accessible format. Accessible Teaching course: case studies
  19. 19. Test your knowledge
  20. 20. Accessible Teaching course quiz How should you name your web links? (select one or more): a. Click here to download and complete the application form. b. Click here to download and complete the application form. c. Click here to download and complete the application form. d. Please complete the application form.
  21. 21. Accessible Teaching course quiz External website links should open in (select one): a) A new window b) The same window
  22. 22. Accessible Teaching course: launching May ‘18 The course will be launched on 9th May at the UCL Interdisciplinary Conference on Disability From this date search UCL Moodle for: Accessible Teaching Practices: Using Universal Design For Learning (UDL) to provide access to all* *Please help us by providing feedback on the course.
  23. 23. Questions? Angel Perez angel.perez@ucl.ac.uk Student Disability Advisor UCL Student Support and Wellbeing Jessica Gramp j.gramp@ucl.ac.uk Digital Education Advisor UCL Information Services Division
  24. 24. Acknowledgements The Accessible Moodle project team also included: Michele Farmer Disability IT Support Analyst UCL Information Services Division (ISD) Mira Vogel Digital Education Advisor UCL Information Services Division

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