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Designing FOR User Experience

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A basic overview of modern UX techniques and concepts. Originally presented at Destination Summit 2014, a conference for destination and ski industry marketing professionals.

A basic overview of modern UX techniques and concepts. Originally presented at Destination Summit 2014, a conference for destination and ski industry marketing professionals.

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Notas

  • Thanks to Ryan Solutions, Inntopia, and mTrip
    Thanks to the ski industry
  • It’s a relationship.
    It’s pervasive – it colors future interactions
    Can’t be completely controlled
  • Designing for UX is a balance between sweating the big stuff and the small stuff.
  • Not “affordable”. A knob affords twisting and pushing. Which is different than opening a door. That’s function.
  • Doing it right: Flickr, Vimeo, Mailchimp
    Shout out to Jay Peak: ads, door hangers
  • Sympathy creates new standards:
    open-source technology, responsive web design, gestural interfaces
    Help new guests find their way to the hill, from home, from the highway, from the parking lot.
  • People FREAK OUT when things change.
    Gmail’s about to change to focus more on the mail experience.
  • Everyone’s an expert. There’s no one solution. Let the numbers decide.
  • HUGE challenge.
    Design, development, budget, Q.A., content strategy.
    I’m not here to sell you on an approach.
  • Help the user. Guide the user. Don’t Trap the user.
    Quality of interactive experience plays a role in purchase decisions.
    Has a lasting psychosomatic impact user’s ultimate satisfaction with the product.
  • Make sure your team feels empowered to improve UX.
    Provide feedback that speaks to specific rationale.
    “Because Bob likes it.” is NOT a good reason to do something.
  • This conversation has died down a bit. But it’s worth noting.
  • Has become the standard for modern web design.
    But thinking critically about it helps produce an better end result.
    Don’t default to it.
  • Browsing on mobile is only ONE possibility. What about arriving from a social media app, or email link?
    Many sites and blogs are being built mobile-only.
  • Two different animals. But you cannot afford to ignore your mobile web presence. An app alone is not a mobile strategy.
    Can they work together?
  • We’ve been doing this all along. We just didn’t know it.
    Wordpress widgets are another example.
  • We’re actually not using as many graphics these days anyway.
    CSS effects, image sprites, 24-bit pngs (alpha channels), flexible background images.
  • We got really good at designing with Helvetica.
    Reduces load time and workarounds, but creates a slew of new issues.
  • Where do we start.
  • This is becoming a standard part of your research process.
    Plenty of dev folks here to help with analytics.
  • What can you infer from analytics?
    What anecdotal evidence do you have?
  • You don’t know what every user needs.
    But you can build a few common scenarios and build a flow to suit.
  • I know, I know. Navigation grows out of control for a number of reasons. This is your chance. Don’t blow it!
  • Not a huge difference, but a style guide can be strictly visual, while a pattern library is usually coded, contextual, semantic.
  • New methods, new challenges, new roles.
  • Let’s talk about what you can do to prepare for a redesign.
  • I start my project kickoffs with this question.
    Other questions: Why should a guest choose you? Why would a guest NOT choose you? What could cause this process to fail? Who are the stakeholders? Who’s doing day-to-day maintenance? What are their proficiencies?
  • Don’t bury your head in the sand. You know your organization. Be realistic.
    Restrictions are fine. They give us structure. As a designer I don’t mind having my hands tied. Go ahead. Please. Tie my hands.
  • Content Strategy is a buzz word too, but for good reason. Someone has to figure out how to tell the story.
  • Copywriting isn’t just the body of the page. It’s navigation. It’s helpful calls to action that set a proper and honest expectation for an action. (affordance) Don’t say “submit” on a button. Who the hell wants to submit? Say “Save now” or “Next Step” or “OK I’m Done”. But don’t be too cute either.
  • Make a guest feel safe. Confident. Secure. Reduce their instinct to panic and they’ll enjoy their time more.
  • Good Design can only happen once you’ve covered all the angles.
  • Thanks.
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