Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Se está descargando tu SlideShare. ×

Pks ms access unit 4_bcomcs

Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Cargando en…3
×

Eche un vistazo a continuación

1 de 67 Anuncio

Más Contenido Relacionado

Presentaciones para usted (20)

Similares a Pks ms access unit 4_bcomcs (20)

Anuncio

Más reciente (20)

Anuncio

Pks ms access unit 4_bcomcs

  1. 1. Presented by P.KALAISELVI Assistant Professor Department of Computer Science SRI VASAVI COLLEGE,ERODE (Self -Finance Wing) Department of Corporate Secretaryship MS-Office &Tally 2013 version UNIT-4-MS ACCESS III-B.Com(CS)
  2. 2. Getting Familiar with Microsoft Access 2007 for Windows  Microsoft Access is a database software package. A database is an organized collection of records.  Telephone and address books are examples of paper databases. With Access, you can create a computerized database.  For example, you can use Access to organize the students who attend a school, the courses they take, and the instructors who teach them. After you create an Access database, you can search it, manipulate it, and extract information from it.  Getting Started  You use windows to interact withAccess.To begin, startAccess 2007.You screen will look similar to the one shown here.
  3. 3.  The Microsoft Office Button  In the upper-left corner of the Access window is the Microsoft Office button. When you click the button, a menu appears. You can use the menu to create a new file, open an existing file, save a file, and perform many other tasks.  The Quick AccessToolbar  Next to the Microsoft Office button is the Quick Access toolbar. The Quick Access toolbar provides you with access to commands you frequently use. By default, Save, Undo, and Redo appear on the Quick Access toolbar. You use Save to save an object, Undo to roll back an action you have taken, and Redo to reapply an action you have rolled back.
  4. 4.  TheTitle Bar  The Title bar is located at the top in the center of the Access window. The Title bar displays the name of the database on which you are currently working.  The Ribbon  You use commands to tell Access what to do. In Access 2007, you use the Ribbon to issue commands. The Ribbon is located near the top of the Access window, below the Quick Access toolbar. At the top of the Ribbon are several tabs; clicking a tab displays related command groups. Within each group are related command buttons. You click buttons to issue commands or to access menus and dialog boxes. You may also find a dialog box launcher in the bottom-right corner of a group. When you click the dialog box launcher , a dialog box makes additional commands available.
  5. 5.  Access Objects  To view or hide the objects on the Navigation pane:  You click the double down-arrows to view objects. The double down- arrows change to double up-arrows .  You click the double up-arrows to hide objects. The double up-arrows change to double down-arrows .  As stated earlier, the Navigation pane stores the objects in your database: tables, queries, forms, reports, macros, and modules. Objects always display with an icon to the right.The icon tells you the object type: table, query, form, report, macro, and module.
  6. 6. Objects Tables InAccess, data is stored in tables.A table is a set of columns and rows, with each column referred to as a field. Each value in a field represents a single type of data. Each row of a table is referred to as a record. Queries You use queries to retrieve specific data from your database and to answer questions about your data. For example, you can use a query to find the names of the employees in your database who live in a particular state. Forms Forms give you the ability to choose the format and arrangement of fields.You can use a form to enter, edit, and display data. Reports Reports organize or summarize your data so you can print it or view it onscreen.You often use reports when you want to analyze your data or present your data to others. Macros Macros give you the ability to automate tasks.You can use a macro to add functionality to a form, report, or control. Modules Like macros, modules give you the ability to automate tasks and add functionality to a form, report, or control. Macros are created by choosing from a list of macro actions, whereas modules are written inVisual Basic for Applications.
  7. 7.  You double-click an object to open the object.You right-click an object to view a menu of options.You can use the menu to do such things as open objects, rename objects, and delete objects.  Objects that are open appear on tabs. Right-click a tab to view a menu of options you can perform, such as save the object, close the object, or change the view.
  8. 8.  ChangeViews  A view is a way of looking at an object. For example, in Access, data is stored in tables. Two of the possible ways you can view a table are Datasheet view and Design view. You can see the data contained in a table in Datasheet view. You can see the design of a table in Design view. When you open an object, buttons appear in the lower-right corner of the Access window. You can use the View button on the Home tab to change views, or you can click the proper button in the lower-right corner of the window.  Close a Database and Exit Access  This completes the introduction to Access using the Northwind database. The following describes how you close a database and exitAccess.  To close a database:  Click the Microsoft Office button.A menu appears.  Click Close Database.Access closes the database.  To exit Access:  Click the Microsoft Office button.A menu appears.  Click Exit Access.You exit Access.
  9. 9.  Create a Database  When you start Access, the Getting Started With Microsoft Office Access screen appears. You can use this screen to create a database. Within a database, you can do such things as enter data, create reports, and retrieve data. You can create a blank database or you can use one of the templates provided by Microsoft. When you use a template, Access creates forms you can use to enter data, reports you can use to retrieve data, and more. You can modify the forms, reports, and other objects to suit your needs.  The following templates are included with Access: Assets, Contacts, Events, Faculty, Issues, Marketing Projects, Projects, Sales Pipeline, Students, and Tasks. Other templates are available online. Each template creates a database related to the title. For example, the Faculty template creates a faculty database that includes tables, queries, forms, and reports related to faculty. In Access, you use tables to store data, queries to retrieve data, forms to enter data, and reports to display data.
  10. 10.  To use a template to create a database: 1. Start Access. The Getting Started With Microsoft Office Access screen appears. 2. Click Local Templates. Icons representing local templates appear in the center of the window. 3. Click the icon for the template you want to use. 4. Click the Browse button.The File New Database window appears. 5. Locate the folder in which you want to store your database. 6. Click OK. 7. Click Create.Access creates and opens your database.
  11. 11. 8. Open the Navigation pane.Access displays the tables, queries, forms, reports and other objects related to the database you selected.You may wish to display the objects by type.  How do I create a database based on the templates that are found online? Online templates fall into the following categories: Business, Education, Personal, and Non-profit.To create a database based on one of these templates: 1. StartAccess.The Getting StartedWith Microsoft OfficeAccess screen appears. 2. Make sure you are connected to the Internet. 3. Click the category for the template you want to create. Icons representing Internet templates appear in the center of the window.
  12. 12. 5. Click the icon for the template you want to use to create your database. 6. Click the Browse button . 7. Locate the folder in which you want to store your database. 8. Click Download.Access prompts you. 9. Click Continue.Access downloads and opens your database. 10. Open the Navigation pane.Access displays the tables, queries, forms, reports, and other objects related to your database.  How do I open an existing database? 1. Click the Office button.A menu appears. 2. Click Open. 3. Locate the folder in which you stored your database. 4. Click the database name. 5. Click Open.Access opens the database.
  13. 13.  Create a Blank Database  A blank database is a database with nothing in it. You must create all the tables, forms, reports, queries, and so on. If you cannot find a template that suits your needs, create a blank database. After you create the database, Access opens to a datasheet and makes available the tools you need to create objects. Creating tables is the first step in building a database.  To create a blank database: 1. StartAccess. 2. Click Blank Database. 3. Type the name you want to give your database in the File Name field. Access will automatically append .accdb to the name. 4. Click the Browse button.The File New Database window appears.
  14. 14. 5. Locate the folder in which you want to store your database. Note that the name of the file appears in the File Name field. 6. Click OK. 7. Click the Create button.Access creates the database and opens a datasheet with theTableTools available to you.  Note theTableTools in the upper-right portion of the Ribbon.
  15. 15.  Creating Microsoft AccessTables  Tables are the foundation of anAccess database.Access stores data in tables  UnderstandingTables  A table is a set of columns and rows. Each column is called a field. Within a table, each field must be given a name and no two fields can have the same name.  Each value in a field represents a single category of data. For example, a table might have three fields: Last Name, First Name, and Phone Number. The table consists of three columns: one for last name, one for first name, and one for phone number.  In every row of the table, the Last Name field contains the last name, the First Name field contains the first name, and the Phone Number field contains the phone number. Each row in a table is called a record.
  16. 16.  All of the data in a table should refer to the same subject. For example, all of the data in the Employees table should refer to employees, all of the data in the Students table should refer to students, and all of the data in the Courses table should refer to courses.  You can view an Access database as a collection of related tables. For example, in a database that contains tables for Employees, Students, and Courses, the Employees table lists the employees, the Students table lists students, and the Courses table lists the courses students can take.  After Access creates a blank database, it opens in Datasheet view and makes available the tools you need to create a table. Datasheet view displays a table as a set of columns and rows. When you view a blank database for the first time in Datasheet view, you see a column named ID. This column is by default the primary key field.
  17. 17. Creating a new database with Access  In the left pane, the template categories—including the featured local templates—are listed, as well as the categories on Office Online. Templates are prebuilt databases focused on a specific task that you can download and use immediately.  You will also see the New Blank Database option, which allows you to build your own database from scratch.
  18. 18.  When you choose the New Blank Database option at the top of the window, you will be prompted to rename the database from the default name, which is Database1.accdb. Rename the database whatever you want. In the example below, we named the database Ready2Read because it's the name of the store in our scenario.  Click Create to finish naming the database.
  19. 19. Setting up tables  The new database opens with one table showing as a default. It also defaults to naming this table Table1 in both the navigation pane and the Table tab itself.You will want to name your tables based on your database design plan.  Naming a table  To give the table a unique name, you must first click on the Microsoft Office button in the upper-left corner of the application.
  20. 20.  Next, select Save from the menu. The Save As dialog box will appear to let you save the table whatever name you want.  The new table names appear in both the navigation pane and the Table tab itself, as you can see in the picture below.
  21. 21.  To close a table:  There are several ways to close an active table. You can right- click the Table tab and choose Close from the menu.  A more common method is to click the X that appears in the top-right corner of the active database object window.  To open a table:  To open a table, right-click the Table name of the table you want to open in the navigation pane, then choose Open from the menu.
  22. 22.  A more common method is to double-click the table name in the navigation pane. The selected table will open in the active database object window.  Adding fields to a table  Access 2007 allows you to add fields to tables when you are:  Working in Datasheet view, which looks like a spreadsheet  Working in Design view, where you are able to set more controls for your fields  Either way, you need to know how to switch between the two views.  To switch views:  Select the Views command group from either the Home tab (seen below) or the Datasheet tab on the Ribbon. Select the view option you want from the menu.
  23. 23.  Adding fields in Datasheet view  By default, Access 2007 creates one field in each new table: the ID field. This field auto-numbers to give each record in the table a unique number identifier. Recall that records are the rows in a table.  To add more fields to a table in Datasheet view, double-click the Add New Field header.
  24. 24.  The Add New Field text will disappear from the header. Name the field by typing the name directly into the header. Press the Tab key on your keyboard to move to the next field.  Adding fields in Design view  In Design view, the field names are along the lefthand column instead of across the top like in Datasheet view, as seen below.  To add a new field to a table in Design view, click in the cell where you want the new field and type the field name. When you switch back to Datasheet view, your new field appears as its own column, as seen below.
  25. 25.  Moving fields  If you want to rearrange the order in which your fields appear in a table, Access 2007 lets you easily move them around. To move a field in Datasheet view, drag and drop the field to the location you want. To do this:  Click the field header for the field you want to move.  Move the mouse in the area of the header.  When the cross with arrows appears, hold down your left mouse button.  With the left mouse button still held down, move the cursor to where you want the field to appear.  Release the mouse button, and the field appears in its new location.
  26. 26.  Deleting fields  To delete a field in Datasheet view, click the field header, then select Delete from the Field & Column command group. This is found on the Datasheet tab on the Ribbon.  WARNING: You should not delete any field in a table without first knowing what impact the deletion may have on the rest of the database!  Setting the data type for a field  Access 2007 lets you control how data can be entered in each table field within your database. This is done using Data Type. The default data type is text for every field after the ID field, which was set to auto- number.You can change the DataType setting in two ways:  From the DataType & Formatting command group on the Ribbon  From the DataType column in Design view
  27. 27.  Setting the data type for a field  Access 2007 lets you control how data can be entered in each table field within your database. This is done using Data Type. The default data type is text for every field after the ID field, which was set to auto- number.You can change the DataType setting in two ways:  From the DataType & Formatting command group on the Ribbon  From the DataType column in Design view  To change data type from the Ribbon:  Click the field header, then select the data type you want from the drop- down menu next to the DateType command.
  28. 28.  To change data type in Design view:  Click the field name, then press the Tab key on your keyboard. From the drop-down menu under the Data Type column, select the format you want.  The data type is more noticeable when the database is being populated with records. It will cause data to be formatted for currency, text, number, and date and time just like it does in Microsoft Excel.
  29. 29. Creating Forms  Access forms are much like paper forms: you can use them to enter, edit, or display data. They are based on tables. When using a form, you can choose the format, the arrangement, and which fields you want to display.  Using the Form Button  Access can automatically create several types of forms. For example, when you click the Form button on the Create tab, Access places all fields in the selected table on a form. If the table has a one-to-many relationship with one other table or query, Access creates a stacked form (the records are displayed in a column) for the primary table and a datasheet for the related table. If there are several tables with a one- to-many relationship,Access does not create the datasheet.
  30. 30.  To create a form: 1. Open the Navigation pane. 2. Click the table or query on which you want to base your form. 3. Activate the Create tab. 4. Click Form in the Forms group.Access creates a form.
  31. 31.  You can use the Navigation bars to move through the records on a form.  Tip: After you create a form, you can save it. You can open a saved form at any time. 1 Go to First Record 2 Go to Previous Record 3 The Current Record 4 Go to Next Record 5 Go to Last Record 6 Create a New (Blank) Record
  32. 32.  To save a form:  Click the Save button on the Quick Access toolbar. Access saves the form unless you are saving for the first time. If you are saving for the first time, the SaveAs dialog box appears.  Type the name you want to give the form.  Click OK. Access saves the form. You can now access the form by using the Navigation pane.  You can also save by right-clicking a form’s tab and then selecting Save from the menu that appears. Access saves the form unless you are saving for the first time. If you are saving for the first time, the Save As dialog box appears. Type the name you want to give the form and then click OK. Access saves the form.You can now access the form by using the Navigation pane.  Create a Split Form  A split form is a form in which the same data is displayed in two views simultaneously. One part of the form displays in Form view (stacked fields), while the other part displays in Datasheet view.
  33. 33.  The two views are synchronized, so as you select a field in one view, it is automatically selected in the other view. You can add, change, or delete the data in either view. Using a split form gives you the benefits of two types of forms in a single form. For example, you can use the datasheet portion to locate records and the form portion to edit records.  To create a split form:
  34. 34. 1. Open the Navigation pane. 2. Click the table or query on which you want to base your form. 3. Activate the Create tab. 4. Click Split Form in the Forms group.Access creates a split form.
  35. 35.  Create a Multiple Items Form  You can use the Multiple Items button on the Forms tab to create a form that displays multiple records, one record per row.  To create a multiple items form: 1. Open the Navigation pane. 2. Click the table or query on which you want to base your form. 3. Activate the Create tab. 4. Click Multiple Items in the Forms group.Access creates a multiple items form.
  36. 36.  Tip: A view is a way of looking at an Access object. Forms have three views: Form view, Layout view, and Design view. You can enter, edit, and view data in Form view. You can modify a form in Layout view or Design view. In Layout view, you can see your data, and the form you see closely resembles what your form will look like when you view it in Form view. You can make most, but not all, changes to your form in Layout view. Design view displays the structure of your form. In this view you cannot see the underlying data, but you can perform some tasks in Design view that you cannot perform in Layout view. This tutorial focuses on Layout view.
  37. 37.  To change the view:  Open the form.  Activate the Format tab.  Click the down-arrow under theView button.A menu appears.  Click the view you want.  Modify a Form  After you create a form, it opens in Layout view, where you can modify it.  To change the size of a field: 1. Click a side of the field and drag to change the width of the field. 2. Click the top or bottom of a field and drag to change the height of a field.  To move a datasheet: 1. Click the datasheet to select it. 2. Click and drag the four-sided arrow in the upper-right corner to move the datasheet.  To resize a datasheet: 1. Click the datasheet to select it. 2. Click a side of the datasheet and drag to change the width.  Click the top or bottom of the datasheet and drag to change the height.
  38. 38.  To apply an AutoFormat:  TheAutoFormat option on the Format tab enables you to apply formats quickly, such as background colors, field colors, field label colors, and fonts. 1. Activate the Format tab. 2. ClickAutoFormat.TheAutoFormat menu appears. 3. Click the format you want to apply.  To change a form title:  When you create a form, by default,Access uses the form name as the title. You can change the title. 1. Activate the Format tab. 2. Click theTitle button. 3. Type the new title.  To add the date and time:  You can easily add the date and time to your form. 1. Activate the Format tab. 2. Click the Date andTime button.The Date andTime dialog box appears. Select the date and time format you want.The date and time appear on your form.
  39. 39. Change Fonts and Formats You can use options on the Format tab to manually apply individual formats to your report. However, before you can apply a format to a field or field label, you must select it. To select a field or field label, click it. To select multiple items, hold down the Shift key and then click each item you want to select. A box surrounds selected items.
  40. 40. Creating Reports  Reports organize and summarize data for viewing online or for printing. A detail report displays all of the selected records. You can include summary data such as totals, counts, and percentages in a detail report. A summary report does not list the selected records but instead summarizes the data and presents totals, counts, percentages, or other summary data only. Access has several report generation tools that you can use to create both detail and summary reports quickly. This lesson teaches you how to create reports.  Use the Report Button  The Report button creates a simple report that lists the records in the selected table or query in a columnar format.
  41. 41. 1. Open the Navigation pane. 2. Click the table or query on which you want to base your report. 3. Activate the Create tab. 4. Click the Report button in the Reports group.Access creates your report and displays your report in Layout view.You can modify the report.
  42. 42.  Tip:After you create a report, you can save it. 1. Click the Save button on the Quick Access toolbar. Access saves the report unless you are saving for the first time. If you are saving for the first time, the Save As dialog box appears. 2. Type the name you want to give your report. 3. Click OK. Access saves the report. You can now access the report by using the Navigation pane.  As with other objects, you can also save a report by right-clicking the reports tab and selecting Save. Saved reports appear in the Navigation pane. Tip: Reports created by using the Report button are plain and simple.The Modify a Report section of this lesson teaches you how to customize a report to meet your needs.
  43. 43.  Tip: Access reports created simply by using the Report button have several sections.They are detailed in the following table. Sections of a Report Report Header Appears at the top of the first page and displays the report title. Page Header Appears at the top of every page and displays the headings (field labels) for each column. Page Footer Appears at the bottom of every page and displays the page number and total number of pages. Detail Section Appears between the page header and page footer and displays the records from the table or query. Report Footer This section is optional. Appears on the last page of the report and displays summary information such as grand totals.
  44. 44.  Use the ReportWizard  You can also use the Report Wizard to create a report.The Report Wizard provides you with more flexibility than you get by using the Report button. You can choose the tables and fields, group the data, sort the data, summarize the data, choose a layout and orientation, apply a style, and title your report. Follow the steps shown here to create a report by using the ReportWizard:
  45. 45.  To create a report by using the ReportWizard:  Open the ReportWizard 1. Activate the Create tab. 2. Click ReportWizard in the Reports group.The ReportWizard appears.  Select tables, queries and fields  When using the Report Wizard, you can use fields from multiple tables and/or queries if the tables/queries have a relationship.
  46. 46. 1. Click the down-arrow next to the Table/Queries field and then click the table from which you want to select fields. 2. Click a field and then click the single-right arrow to select a single field, click the double-right arrows to select all fields, click a field and then click the single-left arrow to deselect a single field, or click the double-left arrow to deselect all fields. 3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for each table from which you want to select fields. 4. Click Next.The ReportWizard moves to the next page.  Group  When using the Report Wizard, you can group data. Grouping puts all of the values in a field into a group based on the field’s value. For example, if your data is grouped by the Department field and the records in the Department field have values such as Administration, Computer Science, and English. Access will group all of the data for the Administration department together, all of the data for the Computer Science department together, and all of the data for the English department together.
  47. 47. 1. Click to select the field by which you want to group your data.You may not see this page of the wizard if you are selecting data from a single table. 2. Click Next.The ReportWizard moves to the next page. 3. Click a field you want to group by. 4. Click the right-arrow to select a field; click a field and then click the left arrow to deselect a field. Use the up- and down-arrows to change the order of the groupings. If you are only using one table, this may be your first opportunity to select a field to group by. 5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for each field you want to group by. 6. Click Next.The ReportWizard moves to the next page.
  48. 48.  Sort and summarize  By using the Report Wizard, you can create up to four levels of sort. Access sorts the first level, and then sorts the second level within that sort, and so on. If you have grouped your data, you can summarize it by displaying the sum, average, and minimum or maximum value for each numeric field. You can choose to have your report display just the summary data or each detail line and the summary data. There is also an option that allows you to display the percent the sum of each group is of the grand total. All of the fields in your report may not fit on a single page. You can haveAccess automatically adjust the size of the font so that every field fits.
  49. 49. 1. Click the down-arrow and then select the field you want to sort by. 2. Click the button to choose ascending or descending order. Clicking the button toggles betweenAscending and Descending.You can sort up to four levels. 3. Click the Summary Options button.The Summary Options window appears.
  50. 50. 4. Click to select the summary data you want. 5. Click to select whether you want detail and summary data or if you want summary data only. 6. Click if you want to calculate the percent to the total for sums. 7. Click OK.The Summary Options window closes. 8. Click Next.The ReportWizard moves to the next page.
  51. 51.  Layout and orientation  You can choose the layout and orientation of your report. The layout determines where each field appears on the page. Access provides three options to choose from: Stepped, Block, and Outline. When you choose an option, the left side of the window displays a graphic of the layout.  Orientation determines whether Access creates the report in portrait or landscape. Most paper, such as paper sized 8 1/2 by 11, is longer on one edge than it is on the other. If you print in Portrait, the shortest edge of the paper becomes the top of the page. Portrait is the default option. If you print Landscape, the longest edge of the paper becomes the top of the page.
  52. 52. 1. Click to select a layout. 2. Click to select a page orientation. 3. Choose the Adjust The Field Width So All Fields Fit On A Page option if you want all fields to fit on a single page. 4. Click Next.The ReportWizard moves to the next page.  Style  A style is a set of formats consisting of such things as background colors, fonts, font colors, and font sizes. Access supplies predesigned styles that format titles, labels, and more. When you choose a style, the left side of the window displays a preview.
  53. 53. 1. Click to select a style. 2. Click Next.The ReportWizard moves to the next page.  Create a title  On the final page of the Report Wizard, you can title your report. The title appears at the top of the report and on the Navigation pane. 1. Type the title you want to give the report. 2. Click Finish.Access creates, saves, and opens your report in Layout view.
  54. 54.  Tip: Reports created with the Report Wizard may have the following two sections in addition to the sections found in reports created by using the Report button. Sections of a Report Group Header Appears before a group and displays information about the group. Group Footer Appears after a group and summarizes the group data.
  55. 55. Create Mailing Labels  InAccess, the easiest way to create a mailing label is to use the Label Wizard.The LabelWizard extracts name and address data from your database and formats it so you can print it on commercially available labels.  Each time you view or print labels, the data are extracted from the database, so as you update your database,Access updates your labels.  To create labels:  Open the LabelsWizard
  56. 56. 1. Click the table or query you want to use to create a label. 2. Activate the Create tab. 3. Click Labels in the Reports group.The LabelsWizard appears.  Choose a product number  Most commercially available labels have a product number.You should be able to find the number on the box.You use the product number to tell Access the dimensions of your labels and the number of columns and rows that are on a page. 1. Click to select the Product Number in the Product Number field. 2. Click Next.The LabelWizard moves to the next page.
  57. 57.  Choose a font, font size, font weight, and color  A font is a set of characters (text) represented in a single typeface. Each character within a font is created by using the same basic style.The LabelWizard has options that allow you to select a font, font size, weight, and color.You can also choose to italicize or underline the text in your labels. 1. Click the down-arrow next to the Font Name field and then select the font.A preview appears in the Sample box. 2. Click the down-arrow next to the Font Size field and then select the font size.A preview appears in the Sample box. 3. Click the down-arrow next to the FontWeight field and then select the font weight.A preview appears in the Sample box. 4. Click the button next to theText Color field and then select a color you want your text to have.A preview appears in the Sample box. 5. Click the Italic box if you want to italicize.A preview appears in the Sample box. 6. Click the Underline box if you want to underline.A preview appears in the Sample box. 7. Click Next.The LabelWizard moves to the next page.
  58. 58.  Create a layout  You create the layout of your labels by selecting fields and placing them in the Prototype Label box.You type any text or spaces that you want to appear on your label. 1. Click a field name and then click the right-arrow to place the field on the prototype label. 2. Press the spacebar to leave spaces. 3. Press the Enter key to move to a new line. 4. Type any text you want to appear on the label. 5. Click Next.The LabelWizard moves to the next page.
  59. 59.  Sort  When creating labels, you can sort on any field and you can have multiple levels of sort. For example, you can sort by last name and then by first name. 1. Click to choose the fields you want to sort by. Click the single right- arrow to select a single field, click the double right-arrow to select all fields, click the single left-arrow to deselect a single field, click the double left-arrow to deselect all fields. 2. Click Next.The LabelWizard moves to the next page.
  60. 60.  Title the report 1. Type a title for your report.The title will appear in the Navigation pane. 2. Click Finish.Access displays the labels in Print Preview.  Tip:When you view labels in Report view, they may appear in a single column. To see how your labels will appear when printed, use Print Preview
  61. 61.  Print a Report  Often, the people who useAccess data only see a printed report. In Print Preview, you can see exactly how your report will look when printed, you can make changes to it, and you can print it.To print, click the Print button in the Print group.The Print dialog box opens and you can select your print options.  To change to Print Preview:  Open your report.  Activate the Home tab.  Click the down-arrow under theView button.A menu appears.  Click Print Preview.Access changes to Print Preview.
  62. 62. Using the Query Design command  Once you've planned out your query, you can build and run it using Access 2007's query tools.  To build a query using the Query Design command:  Select the Query Design command from the Create tab on the Ribbon.  Use the ShowTable dialog box to select which tables and/or queries to include in the query. Our plan called for all three tables.
  63. 63.  Drag and drop the fields you want to see in your results to the bottom portion of the query design screen.  Enter the condition in the Criteria row for the condition field. For our query, we typed Technology in the cell labeled Criteria for the Category field.As seen above,Access 2007 puts quotation marks around the term to show that it is looking for exactly that term within the designated field.  Once the condition is set, click Run! in the Results group on the Ribbon.
  64. 64.  View your results to determine if they match your desired results.  Hiding fields or other information in the results  Sometimes the results of a query will include information that is seemingly unnecessary to you.Access 2007 allows you to easily hide these fields.
  65. 65.  To hide part of the query result:  In the query design window, deselect the Show option by clicking it.  When you run your results, the field you chose will be hidden, as seen below.
  66. 66. Saving the query  Sometimes you will not need to save your results or your query design, and other times you may want to keep it to run again later or to modify it slightly. Saving a query is easy to do.  To save a query:  Right-click the Query tab.  When the Save As dialog box opens, give your query a meaningful name.  Click OK.  The query will now be listed in the object list on the left side of the Access window.
  67. 67. PKS Asst.Prof Dept. of Computer Science SVCSFW,Erode

×