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The nano world

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Descripción

The fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology are known for their contributions to the economy of all countries and almost every human life. They have the capability to foster new developments in science, technology and innovation through the dissemination of new knowledge and applications.

Transcripción

  1. 1. THE NANO WORLD By Prof. Liwayway Memije-Cruz
  2. 2. Nano World • the global market leader for tips for Scanning Probe Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. • sphere of influence of nanotechnology
  3. 3. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) • a branch of microscopy that forms images of surfaces using a physical probe that scans the specimen. • founded in 1981, with the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope, an instrument for imaging surfaces at the atomic level.
  4. 4. Atomic Force Microscopy. • is a type of scanning probe microscopy (SPM), with demonstrated resolution on the order of fractions of a nanometer, more than 1000 times better than the optical diffraction limit. The information is gathered by "feeling" or "touching" the surface with a mechanical probe.
  5. 5. Origin of Nanoscience • in 1959 it was discussed by the renowned physicist Richard Feynman in his talk There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom, in which he described the possibility of synthesis via direct manipulation of atoms. • in 1960, Egyptian engineer Mohamed Atalla and Korean engineer Dawon Kahng at Bell Labs fabricated the first MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field- effect transistor) with a gate oxide thickness of 100 nm, along with a gate length of 20 µm. • in 1962, Atalla and Kahng fabricated a nanolayer- base metal–semiconductor junction (M–S junction) transistor that used gold (Au) thin films with a thickness of 10 nm.
  6. 6. Origin of nanotechnology • the term "nano-technology" was first used by Norio Taniguchi in 1974. • In 1986, K. Eric Drexler used the term "nanotechnology" in his book Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology, which proposed the idea of a nanoscale "assembler" which would be able to build a copy of itself and of other items of arbitrary complexity with atomic control. • In 1980, the emergence of nanotechnology as a field in occurred through convergence of Drexler's theoretical and public work • in 1986, Drexler co-founded The Foresight Institute to help increase public awareness and understanding of nanotechnology concepts and implications.
  7. 7. Nanoscience and technology • branch of science that studies systems and manipulates matter on atomic, molecular and supramolecular scales/ultra-small scale (the nanometre scale).
  8. 8. Nanotechnology • study of what happens when things get very, very small – only a few atoms in size. • refers to the science, engineering, and technology conducted at the nanoscale, which is about 1 to 100 nanometers. • employs the study and application of exceptionally small things in materials science, engineering, physics, biology and chemistry.
  9. 9. Nanotechnology is a very diverse field that is having bigger and bigger impacts on the world. • has applications in medicine, cars, spacecrafts, food, electronics, and materials science just to name a few. • refers broadly to a field of applied science and technology whose unifying theme is the control of matter on the molecular level in scales smaller than 1 micrometer, normally 1 to 100 nanometers, and the fabrication of devices within that size range. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uUDWK4MGcr0
  10. 10. nanometer • a unit of spatial measurement that is 10-9 meter, or one billionth of a meter. • commonly used in nanotechnology, the building of extremely small machines.
  11. 11. Nanoscale and nanostructures
  12. 12. TYPES OF MICROSCOPES USED IN NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY
  13. 13. Electron microscope • a microscope that uses a beam of accelerated electrons as a source of illumination. • In 1930, German engineers Ernst Ruska and Max Knoll built the first electron microscope.
  14. 14. Atomic Force Microscope • a type of high resolution scanning probe microscope that has a resolution that you can measure in fractions of a nanometer. • was pioneered in 1986 by Nobel Prize Winner Gerd Binnig along with Calvin Quate and Christoph Gerber.
  15. 15. Scanning Tunneling Microscope • an instrument for imaging surfaces at the atomic level. • its development in 1981 earned its inventors, Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer (at IBM Zürich), the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1986.
  16. 16. Possible Applications of Nanotechnology in the Philippines: • Information and Communication Technologies and semiconductors • Health and medicine • Energy • Food and agriculture • Environment
  17. 17. Nanotech Roadmap for the Philippines • Information and Communication Technologies and semiconductors • Health and biomedical • Energy • Agriculture and food • Environment • Health and environmental risk • Nano-metrology • Education and public awareness
  18. 18. Advantages and Disadvantages of Nanotechnology Advantages • offers the potential for new and faster kinds of computers • more efficient power sources: • and life-saving medical treatments. Disadvantages • economic disruption • possible threats to security, privacy, health and the environment.
  19. 19. Nanotechnology and Environment Benefits • improved detection and removal of contaminants • development of benign industrial processes and materials Concerns • High reactivity and toxicity • Pervasive distribution in the environment • No nano-specific EPA regulation
  20. 20. Nanotechnology and Health Benefits • improved medicine • could save lives by making diagnosis and treatment far more effective. Concerns • ability to cross cell membranes and translocate in the body. • No FDA approval needed for cosmetics and supplements
  21. 21. Nanotechnology and Economy Benefits • better products • new jobs Concerns • redistribution of wealth • potential costs of clean-ups anf health care • accessibility to all income levels
  22. 22. On 22 November 2018, ten eminent scientists and scientific institutions received the UNESCO Medals for contributions to the development of nanoscience and nanotechnologies during a ceremony held at UNESCO headquarters, Paris. The medal is awarded each year by the Director-General of UNESCO to prominent scientists, public figures and organizations that contributed to the development of nanoscience and nanotechnologies in the spirit of UNESCO’s priorities. • https://en.unesco.org/news/eighth- unesco-medals-contributions- development-nanoscience-and- nanotechnologies
  23. 23. TOP TEN USES AND APPLICATIONS OF NANOTECHNOLOGY by UNESCO 1. Energy storage, productions and conversion. 2. Agricultural productivity enhancement. 3. Water treatment and remediation. 4. Disease diagnosis and screening. 5. Drug delivery systems. 6. Food processing and storage. 7. Air pollution and remediation. 8. Construction. 9. Health monitoring 10. Vector and pest detector and control.
  24. 24. Assignment 1. What are other examples of nanostructures? 2. What tools can manipulate nanostructures? 3. How can nanotechnology address problems in the environment? 4. How can nanotechnology be used in the prevention and treatment of illnesses? 5. What is another example of nanotechnology and how does it works?
  25. 25. References: • http://www.emm-nano.org/what-is-nanoscience- nanotechnology/ • https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/0 90610192431.htm • https://www.ntnu.edu/nano/nanostructured- materials • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30672766 • https://smallbusiness.chron.com/advantages- disadvantages-nanotechnology-37398.html • https://en.unesco.org/news/eighth-unesco- medals-contributions-development-nanoscience- and-nanotechnologies

Descripción

The fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology are known for their contributions to the economy of all countries and almost every human life. They have the capability to foster new developments in science, technology and innovation through the dissemination of new knowledge and applications.

Transcripción

  1. 1. THE NANO WORLD By Prof. Liwayway Memije-Cruz
  2. 2. Nano World • the global market leader for tips for Scanning Probe Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. • sphere of influence of nanotechnology
  3. 3. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) • a branch of microscopy that forms images of surfaces using a physical probe that scans the specimen. • founded in 1981, with the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope, an instrument for imaging surfaces at the atomic level.
  4. 4. Atomic Force Microscopy. • is a type of scanning probe microscopy (SPM), with demonstrated resolution on the order of fractions of a nanometer, more than 1000 times better than the optical diffraction limit. The information is gathered by "feeling" or "touching" the surface with a mechanical probe.
  5. 5. Origin of Nanoscience • in 1959 it was discussed by the renowned physicist Richard Feynman in his talk There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom, in which he described the possibility of synthesis via direct manipulation of atoms. • in 1960, Egyptian engineer Mohamed Atalla and Korean engineer Dawon Kahng at Bell Labs fabricated the first MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field- effect transistor) with a gate oxide thickness of 100 nm, along with a gate length of 20 µm. • in 1962, Atalla and Kahng fabricated a nanolayer- base metal–semiconductor junction (M–S junction) transistor that used gold (Au) thin films with a thickness of 10 nm.
  6. 6. Origin of nanotechnology • the term "nano-technology" was first used by Norio Taniguchi in 1974. • In 1986, K. Eric Drexler used the term "nanotechnology" in his book Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology, which proposed the idea of a nanoscale "assembler" which would be able to build a copy of itself and of other items of arbitrary complexity with atomic control. • In 1980, the emergence of nanotechnology as a field in occurred through convergence of Drexler's theoretical and public work • in 1986, Drexler co-founded The Foresight Institute to help increase public awareness and understanding of nanotechnology concepts and implications.
  7. 7. Nanoscience and technology • branch of science that studies systems and manipulates matter on atomic, molecular and supramolecular scales/ultra-small scale (the nanometre scale).
  8. 8. Nanotechnology • study of what happens when things get very, very small – only a few atoms in size. • refers to the science, engineering, and technology conducted at the nanoscale, which is about 1 to 100 nanometers. • employs the study and application of exceptionally small things in materials science, engineering, physics, biology and chemistry.
  9. 9. Nanotechnology is a very diverse field that is having bigger and bigger impacts on the world. • has applications in medicine, cars, spacecrafts, food, electronics, and materials science just to name a few. • refers broadly to a field of applied science and technology whose unifying theme is the control of matter on the molecular level in scales smaller than 1 micrometer, normally 1 to 100 nanometers, and the fabrication of devices within that size range. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uUDWK4MGcr0
  10. 10. nanometer • a unit of spatial measurement that is 10-9 meter, or one billionth of a meter. • commonly used in nanotechnology, the building of extremely small machines.
  11. 11. Nanoscale and nanostructures
  12. 12. TYPES OF MICROSCOPES USED IN NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY
  13. 13. Electron microscope • a microscope that uses a beam of accelerated electrons as a source of illumination. • In 1930, German engineers Ernst Ruska and Max Knoll built the first electron microscope.
  14. 14. Atomic Force Microscope • a type of high resolution scanning probe microscope that has a resolution that you can measure in fractions of a nanometer. • was pioneered in 1986 by Nobel Prize Winner Gerd Binnig along with Calvin Quate and Christoph Gerber.
  15. 15. Scanning Tunneling Microscope • an instrument for imaging surfaces at the atomic level. • its development in 1981 earned its inventors, Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer (at IBM Zürich), the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1986.
  16. 16. Possible Applications of Nanotechnology in the Philippines: • Information and Communication Technologies and semiconductors • Health and medicine • Energy • Food and agriculture • Environment
  17. 17. Nanotech Roadmap for the Philippines • Information and Communication Technologies and semiconductors • Health and biomedical • Energy • Agriculture and food • Environment • Health and environmental risk • Nano-metrology • Education and public awareness
  18. 18. Advantages and Disadvantages of Nanotechnology Advantages • offers the potential for new and faster kinds of computers • more efficient power sources: • and life-saving medical treatments. Disadvantages • economic disruption • possible threats to security, privacy, health and the environment.
  19. 19. Nanotechnology and Environment Benefits • improved detection and removal of contaminants • development of benign industrial processes and materials Concerns • High reactivity and toxicity • Pervasive distribution in the environment • No nano-specific EPA regulation
  20. 20. Nanotechnology and Health Benefits • improved medicine • could save lives by making diagnosis and treatment far more effective. Concerns • ability to cross cell membranes and translocate in the body. • No FDA approval needed for cosmetics and supplements
  21. 21. Nanotechnology and Economy Benefits • better products • new jobs Concerns • redistribution of wealth • potential costs of clean-ups anf health care • accessibility to all income levels
  22. 22. On 22 November 2018, ten eminent scientists and scientific institutions received the UNESCO Medals for contributions to the development of nanoscience and nanotechnologies during a ceremony held at UNESCO headquarters, Paris. The medal is awarded each year by the Director-General of UNESCO to prominent scientists, public figures and organizations that contributed to the development of nanoscience and nanotechnologies in the spirit of UNESCO’s priorities. • https://en.unesco.org/news/eighth- unesco-medals-contributions- development-nanoscience-and- nanotechnologies
  23. 23. TOP TEN USES AND APPLICATIONS OF NANOTECHNOLOGY by UNESCO 1. Energy storage, productions and conversion. 2. Agricultural productivity enhancement. 3. Water treatment and remediation. 4. Disease diagnosis and screening. 5. Drug delivery systems. 6. Food processing and storage. 7. Air pollution and remediation. 8. Construction. 9. Health monitoring 10. Vector and pest detector and control.
  24. 24. Assignment 1. What are other examples of nanostructures? 2. What tools can manipulate nanostructures? 3. How can nanotechnology address problems in the environment? 4. How can nanotechnology be used in the prevention and treatment of illnesses? 5. What is another example of nanotechnology and how does it works?
  25. 25. References: • http://www.emm-nano.org/what-is-nanoscience- nanotechnology/ • https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/0 90610192431.htm • https://www.ntnu.edu/nano/nanostructured- materials • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30672766 • https://smallbusiness.chron.com/advantages- disadvantages-nanotechnology-37398.html • https://en.unesco.org/news/eighth-unesco- medals-contributions-development-nanoscience- and-nanotechnologies

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