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Lesson 6 • Portraits & Lighting

Lesson 6 • Portraits & Lighting

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Lesson 6 • Portraits & Lighting

  1. 1. P O R T R A I T S TIPS + LIGHTING
  2. 2. O U R G O A L … • A great portrait captures the personality of the subject. • You want your subject to look “good”; the best version of themselves. • However, you also want them to look interesting. • Typically portraits are shot at eye level angle and framed as mid or close-up shot
  3. 3. K E E P I T S I M P L E … • Many portraits tend to have a neutral background so as not to distract from the subject. • Background colours are also important. Try to find colours that will bring out the colours in your subject (clothes, skin tone, eye- colour) • Try not to clash with your subject.
  4. 4. U S E A L A R G E A P E R T U R E ! Using a large aperture (i.e. f1.4 - 4) will create a narrow DoF to blur out the background, drawing focus to your subject.
  5. 5. T I P S HERE ARE SOME TIPS TO HELP IMPROVE YOUR PORTRAITS AND MAKE THEM VISUALLY INTERESTING.
  6. 6. CHANGE YOUR ANGLE / PERSPECTIVE • Most portraits are taken with the camera at (or around) the eye level of the subject. • While this is good common sense – completely changing the angle that you shoot can present a creative perspective of your subject.
  7. 7. P L AY W I T H E Y E C O N TA C T • Looking off camera: • Have your subject focus their attention on something unseen or outside the field of view of your camera. • This can create a feeling of candidness and also create a little intrigue and interest as the viewer of the shot wonders what they are looking at.

  8. 8. P L AY W I T H E Y E C O N TA C T • Looking within the frame • Alternatively, you could have your subject looking at something (or someone) within the frame. • For example, a child looking at a ball, a woman looking at her new baby, a man looking hungrily at an amazing burrito from Burrito Boyz
  9. 9. L I G H T I N G
  10. 10. H O W D O Y O U T H I N K T H I S P H O T O I S L I T ? T H O U G H T S ?
  11. 11. L I G H T I N G • Typically, portraits are lit from the front using soft or diffused lighting • Harsh, bright light is not flattering • Soft light tends to make subjects look good
  12. 12. E X P E R I M E N T W I T H L I G H T I N G • There are almost unlimited possibilities when it comes to using light in portraits. • Directions of light: front, back, top, bottom, and side lighting can create different moods • Using different directions of light can create different patterns of light • Various results can be achieved using natural and studio lighting
  13. 13. T RY T W O , O R T H R E E S O U R C E S O F L I G H T
  14. 14. L I G H T I N G F O R P O R T R A I T S • As we watch the following video clip, take notes on the lighting patterns and how the lights are positioned in each pattern
  15. 15. S P L I T L I G H T I N G • Half of the face is lit, creating dramatic shadow on other side
  16. 16. L O O P L I G H T I N G • Loop lighting is made by creating a small shadow of the subjects noses on their cheeks. To create loop lighting, the light source must be slightly higher than eye level and about 30-45 degrees from the camera
  17. 17. • Loop shadow created under nose • Nose shadow never touches cheek shadow
  18. 18. R E M B R A N D T L I G H T I N G • Rembrandt lighting is identified by the triangle of light on the cheek.
  19. 19. B U T T E R F LY L I G H T I N G • Butterfly lighting is named for the butterfly shaped shadow that is created under the nose by placing the main light source above and directly behind the camera.
  20. 20. B R O A D L I G H T I N G • Broad lighting is not so much a particular pattern, but a style of lighting. Any of the following patterns of light can be either broad or short: loop, Rembrandt, split.
  21. 21. S H O R T L I G H T I N G • Short lighting puts the side turned towards the camera (that which appears larger) in more shadow.
  22. 22. FA M O U S P O R T R A I T P H O T O G R A P H E R S
  23. 23. Y O U S U F K A R S H FA M O U S P O R T R A I T P H O T O G R A P H E R S
  24. 24. A N N I E L E I B O V I T Z FA M O U S P O R T R A I T P H O T O G R A P H E R S
  25. 25. S T E V E M C C U R RY FA M O U S P O R T R A I T P H O T O G R A P H E R S
  26. 26. L E E J E F F R I E S FA M O U S P O R T R A I T P H O T O G R A P H E R S
  27. 27. J I M M Y N E L S S O N FA M O U S P O R T R A I T P H O T O G R A P H E R S
  28. 28. E R I C L A F F O R G U E FA M O U S P O R T R A I T P H O T O G R A P H E R S
  29. 29. D AV I D L A Z A R FA M O U S P O R T R A I T P H O T O G R A P H E R S
  30. 30. J O E L S A N T O S FA M O U S P O R T R A I T P H O T O G R A P H E R S
  31. 31. R I C H A R D AV E D O N FA M O U S P O R T R A I T P H O T O G R A P H E R S
  32. 32. D O R O T H E A L A N G E FA M O U S P O R T R A I T P H O T O G R A P H E R S
  33. 33. P R A C T I C E E X E R C I S E • In a small group or pairs, practice creating each of the lighting patterns: • butterfly lighting • loop lighting • Rembrandt lighting • split lighting • Remember to show both broad lighting and short lighting – for each of the different patterns, where applicable. • Use light from a window, a floor lamp with a bare bulb (take the shade off) or the sun • This works best to start out with the subject facing the camera directly, no turning except to create the broad and short. • Share your results please and share any challenges or problems you encountered.

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