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Catcher [AQA B Lang Lit Cwk Notes]

Teacher of Law en Queensbury School
9 de Jan de 2015
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Catcher [AQA B Lang Lit Cwk Notes]

  1. Welcome to AS Literature and Language Unit Two
  2. Miss Hart’s Essential Rules  On time & Attend  Equipped  Try your best  Complete your homework on time each week  Correct attire  Pride in your work and books Further help… all you have to do is ask! hartm@queensburyacademy.com
  3. Unit Two AS Literature & Language The basics.. Coursework 40% of AS 64 marks in total Two texts Huck Finn & Catcher in the Rye Two Essays…  One analytical essay comparing how the theme of rejection is portrayed two extracts you choose. 1200-1500 words  One creative writing piece aimed at casting new light on one or both texts. Think outside the box! 500-850 words
  4. What’s in a novel? stanza plot soliloquy setting scene chapters rhyme characterisation rhythm ballad Direct speech set design Stage directions dialogue sonnet asides costumes description Narrative perspective
  5. How’s AS different from GCSE? Basically, as well as literary analysis we also look at the novels from a linguistic approach as well. But do you know the difference? Linguistic  Of or relating to language.  Focusing on the style of the language in the novel and on the grammar using technical terminology. Literary  Of, relating to, or dealing with literature.  Focusing on the traditionally key ingredients of a novel. Can you spot the literary and linguistic terms below? Plot Verbs Characterisation Metaphors Simple Sentences Dialect You’ll need a bit of both for the coursework!
  6. How many more devices do you already know? Brainstorm your knowledge with a partner… and be ready to feedback! Literary Linguistic
  7. Catcher in the Rye Read it!
  8. Learning Objectives All of you should be able to understand the key features of everyday speech including: • Idiolect • Colloquial language • Common lexis • Contractions (elision) • Incomplete sentences (ellipsis) • Vague language/fillers Most of you should be able to identify a range of these in Chapter One. Some of you will be to apply them to analyse how Salinger creates a distinctive ‘voice’ for Holden.
  9. Holden is our narrator and his 17 year old ‘voice’ is key to the tale! What would you say are the typical elements of teen speak (in AS language the teenage vernacular!)
  10. Can you identify any of these in Chapter One? We’ll look at the first paragraph together… If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you’ll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don’t feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth. In the first place, that stuff bores me, and in the second place, my parents would have two hemorrhages apiece if I told anything pretty personal about them. They’re quite touchy about anything like that, especially my father. They’re nice and all - I’m not saying that - but they’re also touchy as hell. Besides, I’m not going to tell you my whole goddam autobiography or anything. I’ll just tell you about this madman stuff that happened to me last Christmas just before I got pretty run-down and had to come out and take it easy. I mean that’s all I told D.B. about, and he’s my brother and all. He’s in Hollywood. That isn’t too far from this crumby place, and he comes over and visits me practically every week end. He’s going to drive me home when I go home next month maybe. He just got a Jaguar. One of those little English jobs that can do around two hundred miles an hour. It cost him damn near four thousand bucks. He’s got a lot of dough, now. He didn’t use to. He used to be just a regular writer, when he was home. He wrote thizs terrific book of short stories, The Secret Goldfish, in case you never heard of him. The best one in it was ‘The Secret Goldfish.’ It was about this little kid that wouldn’t let anybody look at his goldfish because he’d bought it with his own money. It killed me. Now he’s out in Hollywood, D.B., being a prostitute. If there’s one thing I hate, it’s the movies. Don’t even mention them to me.
  11. Features of everyday speech: Features of everyday speech Incomplete sentences (ellipsis) Vague language/fillers eg “sort of”, “I mean” Use of slang and colloquial language Repetition Contractions (elision) Ordinary/common lexis Digression
  12. Student Task 2: Can you analyse the passage, brining together literary and linguistic approaches? What happens in the chapter? How might the events of this chapter link to the theme of rejection? Characterisation What do we learn about Holden from what he says/does/describes etc. Style and vocabulary How do the words, style and structure support your interpretation of Holden and his character?
  13. Starter: Do you know your terminology? Across 1. Word which adds nothing to the sentence, but conveys the speaker's feelings. (9) 3. Term for words which are contracted together e.g. ain't (7) 6. The particular use of language and grammar by a particular geographical group or social class. (7) 8. Extreme exaggeration for effect (9) 9. Term covering a speaker who wanders away from his central topic! (10) 10. Term for words or phrases (5) Down 2. Term covering a person's language, the words they choose and any other features that characterise their speech and writing. (8) 4. Word or phrase used in informal language (10) 5. Word or sound typical of speech, but without any real meaning (6) 7. Way of pronouncing words typical to a particular area (6) 11. Non standard words used, often within a particular group (5)
  14. Literary and Linguistic features to consider in Chapter 2: In pairs, you are each going to be given one of the areas to look at in Chapter 2…
  15. Homework Write a passage describing something that happened to you in the summer holidays in the style of Holden Caulfield. It does not need to be any longer than a side of A4, and can be shorter! Due 12.09.2014 ….and read the novel!
  16. Starter: Did you Hold en to the idiolect? Boy, the whole thing was a bastard. If you really want to hear about it, what happened was it was the day of the Quidditch match with Slytherin. I was as anxious as hell; I was already all worried about what crumby thing old Voldemort was going to come up with next. I mean, his goddam death eaters had already killed my godfather, Sirius, but I don't want to talk about that. It's too depressing. Anyway, old Ron and me fly on to the pitch. The crowd below us are all going crazy. Then I fly into Malfoy, the ferret faced little sonuvadeatheater. He started griping about me grassing up his old man. He just about drove me crazy. "You're a goddamn moron, Malfoy," I screamed at him. I was about to hex him, but Ron held me back. He kills me, old Ron, he really does. You'd really like him. Guardian.co.uk Swap your homework with another. Highlight and annotate the work to show where they have captured the idiolect of Holden and how (technique)
  17. Recapping your learning on Chapter Two: In addition to collating notes on your area of the chapter, see if you can use the text to answer the following questions… How is the way Holden talks to Spencer different to the way he talks to us the reader? Why do you think this is? How does Holden react to the reading of his essay? Why do you think he reacts that way? Is he right to? Holden refers to characters as ‘old’ Spencer, ‘old’ Haas. Why do you think he does this? How does his language change during the chapter? What does this reveal about him? Holden says he and Spencer were “too much on opposite sides of the pole”. Do you agree? Why? Why not? What does Holden think of himself?
  18. Final consolidation: Holden’s Idiolect - his particular way of speaking.  What words or phrases are typical of his language so far? What does he use frequently, what are his favourite fillers etc.  How are his sentences typically constructed? New Term: Holden also likes to use a number of idioms. An idiom is a phrase which has no literal meaning, but represents something else e.g. pull your socks up. Can you spot them, and what do you think their effect on the voice is?
  19. … a bit of recap on some old knowledge! Sentence Types
  20. Alternative Homework: All of you need to find out what is meant by the terms below. Some of you will be able to explain how they may link to the novel. Bildungsroman Picaresque
  21. … and a bit of new learning! Sentence Moods Declarative sentences Interrogative sentences Imperative sentences Exclamative sentences Can you identify the mood of the following sentences?  Sit up straight and sort your uniform out  Why do I have to read a book?  I can’t stand it anymore, I’m leaving!  Holden Caulfield is not the best student at school  Do you want to live forever? Look at the section… which mood is the most common? What effect does that have on the reader’s relationship to Holden?
  22. A closer textual analysis: Applying what you have learnt so far. How does the writer show Holden’s disdain for Ossenberger in Chapter 3 (link to the theme of rejection) We will focus on:  Hyperbole  Use of sentence types and moods  Use of first person narrative  Slang and Americanisms  Aspects of everyday speech You will write this up for homework this week… and remember to keep reading!
  23. Where I lived at Pencey, I lived in the Ossenburger Memorial Wing of the new dorms. It was only for juniors and seniors. I was a junior. My roommate was a senior. It was named after this guy Ossenburger that went to Pencey. He made a pot of dough in the undertaking business after he got out of Pencey. What he did, he started these undertaking parlors all over the country that you could get members of your family buried for about five bucks apiece. You should see old Ossenburger. He probably just shoves them in a sack and dumps them in the river. Anyway, he gave Pencey a pile of dough, and they named our wing alter him. The first football game of the year, he came up to school in this big goddam Cadillac, and we all had to stand up in the grandstand and give him a locomotive--that's a cheer. Then, the next morning, in chapel, be made a speech that lasted about ten hours. He started off with about fifty corny jokes, just to show us what a regular guy he was. Very big deal.
  24. Then he started telling us how he was never ashamed, when he was in some kind of trouble or something, to get right down his knees and pray to God. He told us we should always pray to God--talk to Him and all-- wherever we were. He told us we ought to think of Jesus as our buddy and all. He said he talked to Jesus all the time. Even when he was driving his car. That killed me. I just see the big phony bastard shifting into first gear and asking Jesus to send him a few more stiffs. The only good part of his speech was right in the middle of it. He was telling us all about what a swell guy he was, what a hot-shot and all, then all of a sudden this guy sitting in the row in front of me, Edgar Marsalla, laid this terrific fart.
  25. It was a very crude thing to do, in chapel and all, but it was also quite amusing. Old Marsalla. He damn near blew the roof off. Hardly anybody laughed out loud, and old Ossenburger made out like he didn't even hear it, but old Thurmer, the headmaster, was sitting right next to him on the rostrum and all, and you could tell he heard it. Boy, was he sore. He didn't say anything then, but the next night he made us have compulsory study hall in the academic building and he came up and made a speech. He said that the boy that had created the disturbance in chapel wasn't fit to go to Pencey. We tried to get old Marsalla to rip off another one, right while old Thurmer was making his speech, but be wasn't in the right mood. Anyway, that's where I lived at Pencey. Old Ossenburger Memorial Wing, in the new dorms
  26. Self-Assessment yes/no/not sure 1. I am confident I can explain how Salinger creates Holden’s voice. 2. I can identify features of everyday language. 3. I can study a text using literary and linguistic techniques.
  27. Starter: Literary or linguistic? 10 terms. All of them are either literary or linguistic terms. Can you find them and put them in the right place?
  28. Starter: Confidence in Linguistic and Literary Analysis I'm the most terrific liar you ever saw in your life. It's awful. If I'm on my way to the store to buy a magazine, even, and somebody asks me where I'm going, I'm liable to say I'm going to the opera. It's terrible. So when I told old Spencer I had to go to the gym and get my equipment and stuff, that was a sheer lie. I don't even keep my goddam equipment in the gym. 1. Can you spot the filler? What is its purpose? 2. What is the impact of the declarative sentence in the first line? 3. Look at the two short sentences. What does the lexis have in common and what impact does this have? 4. How might the adjective ‘sheer’ contradict the earlier statement that he is a ‘terrific’ liar? 5. What does the reader learn about Holden’s character?
  29. First Assessment
  30. Reading Chapter Three: Chapter Three: In addition to collating notes, see if you can use the text to answer the following questions… What is Holden’s impression of Ackley? How do we know this? Using what you learnt about sentence moods, look at Ackley’s sentences. What mood does he tend to use? What might that reveal about Holden and Ackley’s relationship What do you think the importance of the horsing around is? Again, we hear about the football game. The recurring image of the game may link to the theme of rejection how? What do you think the hat symbolises?
  31. Literary and Linguistic features to consider in Chapter 3:
  32. Self-Assessment yes/no/not sure 1. I am confident I can explain how Salinger creates Holden’s voice. 2. I can identify features of everyday language. 3. I can study a text using literary and linguistic techniques.
  33. No Crumby students allowed! To prove your lack of phoniness, you are going to produce a visual representtation of chapters 4-6 in pairs. Aim is to answer the following question for your extract: “Explain how Salinger presents Holden Caulfield and his voice in the chapter from Catcher in the Rye” All of you should be able to identify a range of literary and linguistic devices which clearly mark Holden’s idiolect, and summarise the main actions of the chapter. Most of you should be able to look at how the actions and responses of Holden reveal his characteristics in the extract and select one section to produce a focused annotation on. Some of you should be able to support this with reference to well identified examples, beginning to use literary and linguistic terminology accurately to support them. It must also include:  One visual representation of part of Holden’s idiolect  One pun
  34. No Crumby students allowed! To prove your lack of phoniness, you are going to produce a visual representation of chapters 1-4 in pairs. Aim is to answer the following question for your extract: “Explain how Salinger presents Holden Caulfield and his voice in the early part of Catcher in the Rye” All of you should include: • Key characteristics • What he thinks of other people • Key markers of his idiolect. (terms and examples!) Most of you should include: • An annotated section of chapter four, looking at the markers of his idiolect and their impact • How he is rejected or rejects others so far (links to theme) Some of you should be able to: • Identify and explain how Holden’s voice changes to determine his view of other characters. • Explain Holden’s narrative view point and how he establishes a relationship with the reader. It must also include:  One visual representation of part of Holden’s idiolect  One pun
  35. Starter: Challenge – can you name all 11 main types of punctuation? 1. Exclamation mark 2. Question mark 3. Apostrophe 4. Full stop 5. Comma 6. Speech Marks 7. Hypen/dash 8. Colon 9. Semi-colon 10. Parentheses 11. Ellipsis
  36. Who’s rejecting who? Evidence Holden rejects Stradlater Evidence Stradlater rejects Holden
  37. Exploding a quotation… “Take her… She’s too old for you” Imperative verb suggesting control and that Stradlater is in the position of power – he controls woman as a possession. Elliptical punctuation suggesting Stradlater is rethinking it and dismissing (rejecting) Holden Contrast of pronouns – start and end of sentence, suggests a dismissive tone and contrast between Stradlater (who is accepted by the girl) and Holden (who is rejected). Adverb emphasising Holden’s youth the fact he doesn’t fit in with Stradlater’s world. Much more confident tone than the uncertain frustration of Holden’s first person narration, shown through declarative sentence. Extension: Compare it to Holden’s “Give her to me, boy. No kidding. She’s my type.”
  38. Cut it out Holden, for Chrissake! So let’s do this one together….
  39. Stradlater wasn’t hardly listening. He was combing his gorgeous locks And now you have a go…
  40. He had his coat on, and he was all ready to go. And now you have a go…
  41. Chapter Four: Consolidation Using what we have talked about this lesson, and the exploded quotations, answer the question below in your note books. • What is Holden’s relationship with Stradlater like? • How do we know this? • How does this link to the theme of rejection in the chapter? Challenge: Can you develop your response further by comparing it to how Holden rejects Stradlater?
  42. Homework: Read Chapter 5 1. What do we discover about Holden from his description of Allie’s death? 2. What else do we learn about Holden from the other actions in the chapter? It should be a summary, and so in note form, which you are ready to discuss in Monday’s lesson.
  43. Starter: Terminology snap! You all have 17 terms, their definitions and examples. All of you should be able to match the term to the definition. Most of you should be able to match it to the example Some of you should be able to use the quote to explain the impact or consequence of using that device there.
  44. New terminology: Determiners Nouns are often preceded by the words the, a, or an. These words are called DETERMINERS. They indicate the kind of reference which the noun has. If it is the, it can be known as the definite article. If an, it is the indefinite article. The articles the and a/an are the most common determiners, but there are many others: any taxi that question those apples Many determiners express quantity: all examples both parents many people And some even express numbers! Using your knowledge: Can you spot the determiners in this paragraph? All people think that they are the only ones who have to suffer. There is no escape for a person who studies many books. They have to read each text and pay attention to this teacher so that they obtain whichever grade they need to move forward. One day they will thank me!
  45. Firstly today, we need to read the end of Chapter 6 and all of Chapter 7… … but let’s start with chapter 6! What are we going to do? At least in lesson one!
  46. Word classes and their meaning… Nouns Adjectives Verbs Adverbs Conjunctions Pronouns Why do you need to be able to identify these in the text?
  47. Homework: Read Chapters 7-9 inclusive.  Make a ten bullet point list of the plot;  How does Salinger characterise Holden (so, what do we discover about him and what does this imply?);  How is the theme of rejection portrayed here (you may find the analysis grid we have used in the early chapters useful to organise your findings)? Detailed analysis of the section in your handout… Go through this extract and identify all the adjectives and verbs you can. (Clue – look at phrases with verbs in). Can you explain what type of verbs are being used and why? Do you notice any patterns in the verbs and adjectives (do they have anything in common?) If so, what effect do they have?
  48. A more creative approach… You have an extract from two first person narrative books in front of you. You might have read one of these! What sort of person wrote them?  Age?  Gender?  Key characteristics? Can you breakdown the idiolect of each narrator?  Markers of written speech?  Word class usage? Use the terms from last lesson and this course so far to annotate!
  49. Challenge: Can you Hold en to a voice? Imagine that Holden has met Georgia, and/or Adrian. Write the text of that meeting and conversation from the viewpoint of one of the characters! What would they think of each other? What would they think about other people? All of you should be able to easily replicate Holden’s idiolect Most of you should be able to transfer that knowledge to replicate another Character’s idiolect Some of you should be able to cast new light on Holden’s character through your writing. Be prepared to share! Each of you will contribute your best lines to our class depiction*. *There will be a small prize for the best conversation!
  50. The best bit of your conversation…
  51. Words are everything Synonyms for rejection If you are rejected, how would you feel? If you are rejecting someone or thing, how would you feel?
  52. Starter: Chapter 11: Holden thinks of Jane…  What patterns or links do you notice between the following words?  How might they link to a theme of the novel?  What might they reveal about the character using them? Whory-looking Tired Depressing Big fat colored guy Terrific Big shot Corny Funny Goddam *No homework handed in, or done incorrectly? Leave and return with it complete at 9.35
  53. So that’s the adjectives, what about the verbs? …is there a pattern? Consolidation: Explain why “Holden’s language is the language of rejection”.  All of you should be able to identify three reasons with clear examples to answer the question.  Most of you should be able to support the explanation with reference to the literary or linguistic form.  Some of you will be able to look at patterns of language to justify your response.  Getting the hell out  Went up  Put on  Took a look out the window  Lights and all were out now  Prostituted himself  He used to take me  I don’t know  Feel like turning his goddam piano over.  I went down in the elevator again  He won’t hardly even talk to you
  54. Introduction: What do the exam board want you to be able to do? Working through with a partner, tick off what you have covered so far and what you will be able to do in an assignment. Ignore the italics…that’s coursework two!
  55. Student Task: Factors affecting production and reception You will be working in small groups of two or three to produce a short presentation, which you will present to the rest of the class. You will have no more than two hours to research and prepare it. It must contain:  A PowerPoint of no more than five slides (plus a title one)  A hand out summarising the key information you have discovered and a consolidation task. You will present back your work as a team, and all members must contribute. Further detail on the hand out  No more than two sides of A4.  Must include how your topic links to the novel (the characterisation of Holden and the theme of rejection)  Must have one evaluative task which will allow you to check that the other students have understood your information. And its relevant) Further detail on the PowerPoint Each slide must contain no more than 25 words in total. Your final slide must also cite the three most useful sources you used in finding your information. One of your slides must comment on the links between your topic and the book.
  56. Group One: Salinger and the Reception of the Book.  Who was J D Salinger?  What sort of texts did he write?  Why did he write Catcher in the Rye?  How was the book received when it was first published? Why? Challenge: How far do you think that the Character of Holden reflects Salinger?
  57. Group Two: Social Factors affecting the novel  What was life like in America in the 1950s?  What was American society like?  How was it changing?  Why is the consumer culture relevant to the 1950s? Challenge: How does the reception of the book and its treatment reflect the social pressures of its time? Terms to consider… Consumerism economic materialism
  58. Group Three: Historical & Cultural Factors affecting the novel  The book was published in 1951 and appeared in serial form between 1495 and 1946. What is relevant about those dates?  What historical events took place at the time of the novel?  What sort of films and music were people going to see?  What other literature and arts were in effect at the time? Challenge: How far is Catcher part of a larger pattern of rebellion in the 1950s context? Beatniks Communism
  59. Group Five: Life for the 1950s teenager  What was life like for a teenager in the 1950s?  What were boys and girls expected to do?  In what ways was life changing for them?  Why is the term ‘teenager’ relevant to the 1950s life? Challenge: How has Holden influenced others since?
  60. Definitions and understanding…. 1. Characterisation. 2. Narrative method. 3. Style. 4. Vocabulary 5. Literary and linguistic features. 6. Factors affecting production and reception. Thinking… What do each of these mean? Which can you comment on? Which can you not comment on yet?
  61. Plenary: Do you agree with each of the statements? 1. I can explain what idiolect means. 2. I can explain how Holden’s idiolect is created by Salinger and the effect it has on the reader. 3. I can explain the features of everyday conversation and their effect in Holden’s narrative. 4. I can explain the importance of the first person narrative in Catcher. 5. I can identify sentence types and moods and explain how they are used in Catcher for effect. 6. I can explain how dialogue/direct speech is used by Salinger and why it is important.
  62. Adverbs, Prepositions & Listing Syndetic listing (using a conjunction, eg and). Asyndetic listing (using a comma or semi- colon) A preposition usually indicates place, time or direction. Eg: The book is ON the table. The book is BENEATH the table. She threw the book THROUGH the window. He threw the book ACROSS the table. Adverbs – in addition to words like ‘angrily’, ‘happily’, where the lexical choice describes the verb, there are other adverbs, eg, next, now, then, which add extra information to the sentence – how does Twain use them in the extract?
  63. PLAGARISM
  64. Homework Produce a summary of the assigned chapter from Catcher in the Rye, suitable for the other members of the class to use as a guide and support to their learning. It must cover:  Plot  Characterisation  Links to Theme  Linguistic and literary terms used  Links to context (factors affecting production and reception)  Relevant key quotes Those whose homework is unacceptable will also have to redo their notes for the lesson on Monday. Chapter 21 Chapter 22 Chapter 23 Chapter 24 Chapter 25 Chapter 26 Peter Emily T Andrew Emily Eryn Antonietta Lydia Sarah Sophie Josh Hayley Stephen Due 21.11.2014

Notas del editor

  1. idiolect Term covering a person's language, the words they choose and any other features that characterise their speech and writing. (8)Elision Term for words which are contracted together e.g. ain't (7)filler Word or sound typical of speech, but without any real meaning (6)dialect The particular use of language and grammar by a particular geographical group or social class. (7)Colloquial Word or phrase used in informal language (10)Lexis Term for words or phrases (5)Hyperbole Extereme exaggeration for effect (9)Slang Non standard words used, often within a particular group (5)Accent Way of pronouncing words typical to a particular area (6)Expletive Word which adds nothing to the sentence, but conveys the speaker's feelings. (9)Digression Term covering a speaker who wanders away from his central topic! (10)
  2. CHARACTERISATION DECLARATIVE EXPLETIVES HYPERBOLE IDIOLECT INTERROGATIVE METAPHOR SLANG SYMBOLISM VERNACULAR
  3. Idiom exclamative mood expletive.
  4. Irregular grammar emphasising lasck of listenting. Adverb hardly. Implied sarcasm?
  5. Not ‘his’ coat. Handed over authority and understanding.
  6. A preposition usually indicates place, time or direction. Eg: The book is ON the table. The book is BENEATH the table. She threw the book THROUGH the window. He threw the book ACROSS the table. Adverbs – in addition to words like ‘angrily’, ‘happily’, where the lexical choice describes the verb, there are other adverbs, eg, next, now, then, which add extra information to the sentence – how does Twain use them in the extract?
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