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Digital culture

  1. 1. Academy 2.0? The Emerging Digital Culture within Higher Education Thursday, 4 April 13
  2. 2. Social Media within Universities National organizations - RCUK, AHRC, ESRC, NCRM, professional associations etc University groups Universities Research projects University services Academic departments Individual scholars Thursday, 4 April 13
  3. 3. So what purpose does this serve? Enhancing institutional reputation and prestige. Social media engagement coming to be seen as integral to marketing and communications strategies in some institutions. Need to ‘differentiate’ from other institutions in increasingly competitive higher education market. Need to build and sustain relations with students (former and current) and alumni Careful management of reputation integral to this - social media as opportunity AND threat Thursday, 4 April 13
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  5. 5. But how are researchers using social media...? • Take-up of most institutionally-provided and open web technology tools and applications is low among doctoral students overall • Generation Y doctoral students are more likely than older doctoral students to use technology to assist them in their research • Generation Y doctoral students tend to use technology applications and social media in their research if they augment, and can be easily absorbed into, existing work practices • Levels of use of social media and other applications helpful in retrieving and managing research information are steadily rising among Generation Y doctoral students, but those applications most useful for collaboration and scholarly communications remain among the least used • Fellow students and peers are the major influence on whether or not Generation Y doctoral students decide to use a technology application and are their main source of hands-on help (JISC Researchers of Tomorrow) Thursday, 4 April 13
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  7. 7. If you build it, will they come? How researchers perceive and use web 2.0 - Research Information Network (2010) Thursday, 4 April 13
  8. 8. Nigel Thrift on emergence of speculative realism 1.Facilitate activity that goes on ‘beneath the radar’ of ‘disciplinary policing’. 2.Allow established figures to communicate in a more immediate way. 3.Allow researchers to become established more quickly. 4.They loosen disciplinary boundaries, allowing material to be imported more easily from other disciplines. 5.They make it easier for researchers to communicate, allowing the exploration and development of topics that may later come to be profoundly important. 6.New material reaches audiences more rapidly than it would in traditional scholarly communication. Thursday, 4 April 13
  9. 9. How are researchers using blogs...? Describing PhD ‘journey’, messy reality of Journey Blogs research Aiding research productivity, pedagogical Self Help or ‘Survival’ Blogs and directed at PhD students Articulating and reflecting on academic Academic Practice Blogs practice Academic Blog Aggregators Aggregating a range of content Research Communication Communicating research and debates Blogs HTTP://PATTHOMSON.WORDPRESS.COM/BLOGGING-PAPER-IN-PROGRESS/ Thursday, 4 April 13
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  15. 15. What sort of blog...? “We don’t think single-author blogs are a sustainable or genuinely useful model for most academics – although all praise to the still many exceptional academics who can manage to keep up the continuous effort involved. By joining together and forming multi-author blogs, academics can mutually reinforce each other’s contributions.” - Chris Gilson and Patrick Dunleavy Thursday, 4 April 13
  16. 16. What is ‘publishing’? “By publishing we mean simply the communication and broad dissemination of knowledge, a function that has become both more complex and more important with the introduction and rapid evolution of digital and networking technologies. There is a seeming limitless range of opportunities for a faculty member to distribute his or her work, from setting up a web page or blog, to posting an article to a working paper website or institutional repository, to including it in a peer-reviewed journal or book.” - Laura Brown, Rebecca J. Griffiths, Matthew Rascoff & Kevin Guthrie Thursday, 4 April 13
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  18. 18. At root it’s a WEIRD business model... “Publishers have a mediating role in the industry. They collect, package and disseminate the articles produced by faculty authors. The primary user of the journals is the very same group that produced journal content – faculty of colleges and universities. After journal content is consumed by the faculty/scholars, new knowledge and research is produced and continues the cycle.” McGuigan and Russell (2008) And this weird business model has very real day-to-day consequences for researchers... Thursday, 4 April 13
  19. 19. “universities have been translated from collegial collectivities, supporting intra- and inter-psychic freedom for community members, to managed power hierarchies that govern (a broader spectrum of) individuals through techniques of accounting, audit and surveillance” Boden, R. and Epstein, D. (2011) “A flat earth society? Imagining academic freedom”.The Sociological Review, 59:3, pp.478-479 Thursday, 4 April 13
  20. 20. The tension between using social media to communicate and using social media because ‘we have to these days’ The tension between marketing/communications and research-led use of social media The institutional recognition of ‘non-traditional’ digital outputs The possibility of a ‘new collegiality’ facilitated through increasingly autonomous networks The changing public role of academics, as well as broader ramifications of an extended communicative repertoire Thursday, 4 April 13
  21. 21. FURTHER READING LSE Impact Blog - http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/ Cameron Neylon- http://cameronneylon.net/ The Scholarly Kitchen - http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/ Bjorn Brembs - http://bjoern.brembs.net/ Stephen Curry - http://occamstypewriter.org/scurry/ Scholarly Publishing Bundle - http://bundlr.com/b/scholarly-publishing-open-access- and-the-academic-spring @MARK_CARRIGAN MARK@MARKCARRIGAN.NET WWW.MARKCARRIGAN.NET Thursday, 4 April 13

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