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The Impact of Instructional Design on Medical School Curriculum

SLATE Conference 2016

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The Impact of Instructional Design on Medical School Curriculum

  1. 1. The Impact of Instructional Design on Medical School Curriculum Max Anderson, MLIS, MS @maxlibris Instructional Designer University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago - Office of Curricular Affairs 1
  2. 2. Take-Aways • What determined the need for an Instructional Designer at UI College of Medicine - Chicago? • Role of the Instructional Designer at UI COM - Chicago • Evidence-based best practices are suggested to faculty • Feedback loops • Future plans for improvement 2
  3. 3. Snapshot of UI College of Medicine - Chicago • Largest medical school in the country (in terms of student population) • Change in campus structure • Other campuses • Curricular redesign looming 3
  4. 4. “How Did We Ever Function Without an Instructional Designer!?” 4 IKR?
  5. 5. 5 Me French —> Librarian —> Instructional Designer —> Instructional Technology Or, how did I get from here to there, or there to here?
  6. 6. 6 Challenges • Teaching faculty who were never trained to be educators • Faculty who are ‘meh’ about new teaching methods • Slow moving bureaucracy • Low or stagnant board scores • Faculty evaluated poorly (and no follow-up)
  7. 7. ADDIE Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation Backward Design Photo Credit: ©iStockphoto.com/arcady_31 • Merrill’s First Principles of Instruction • Dick and Carey Model • Kemp’s ID Model • Gagne’s Nine Events of Instruction • Bloom • Kirkpatrick • Etc. 7
  8. 8. 8
  9. 9. Analysis • What types of learning constraints exist? • What are the delivery options? • What are the pedagogical considerations? • What is the timeline for project completion? 9
  10. 10. Design • Documentation of the project’s instructional, visual, and technical design strategies • Apply instructional strategies to outline/create course content • Create storyboards • Design the user interface and user experience • Prototype creation • Apply visual design 10
  11. 11. Getting there… 11
  12. 12. Much better… 12
  13. 13. Development • Developers create and assemble the content assets • Programmers work to develop and / or integrate technologies • Testers perform debugging procedures • Project is reviewed and revised according to feedback from team 13
  14. 14. Development • Populate modules with content (tables, videos, images, text, etc.) • Blackboard tools: Blog, discussion board, quizzes, group tools, mashups, etc.) • Integrated tools: Echo360, Collaborate, Explain Everything, Sharestream, etc. 14
  15. 15. Implementation • TAs and Instructors prepared to use new tools used in course • Learners prepared to use new tools, mode of delivery, and pedagogical approach • ID ensures that the learning materials (books, hands-on equipment, tools, and software) are in place and course site is functional 15
  16. 16. Evaluation • Formative evaluation • Informing the design • Present in each stage of ADDIE process • Summative evaluation • Informs instructional design improvements • Conducted after course implementation is over • Need data from systems and users 16
  17. 17. 17 Result of focus groups Course directors have limited ‘power’ In ‘complex’ courses, CD don’t know exactly where to make changes Frustration with low student attendance at lecture Time-management - feeling of being overwhelmed Photo from http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=13829
  18. 18. UICOM - Chicago Course & Instructor Evaluations: Continuous Quality Improvement In AY 2015-2016 196 individual instructor reports 16 course reports 3,855 pages of documentation 16 meetings with Course Directors and Department Heads 9 meetings with Deans, Department Heads and Course Directors 18 Evaluation Cycle for One Fall Course September January April July Faculty Workshops Faculty Teaching Observations TBL Observations Course Director ‘Pre- ‘Meeting Deans, Department Head, Course Director ‘Pre- ‘Meeting Student Curricular Board (SCB) Report summarizing ongoing feedbackInnovations on Deck • Automate report production via Benware • Contextualize data to improve decision- making • Document instructor response to feedback • Rapid evaluations by students Fall 1. Each instructor is evaluated by students as the course progresses • Instruction events • Evaluation of instructors 2. Students evaluate the course when it ends • Evaluation of course • Educational materials analysis (best practices for presentations) • Instructor & Course Evaluation (last year & this year) • Course Director receives reports to distribute to instructors • Course Director meets with Curriculum Dean and Instructional Designer; develops plan • Course Director discusses plan with Deans • SCB: Course & Faculty reports • Faculty workshops • Course Director implements modified course elements Spring
  19. 19. 19 Best Practices Guidelines Conceived of, and approved by students, faculty, staff in December 2013 and updated with additional evidence-based content in July 2015 & July 2016
  20. 20. Multimedia Design Medical Education Volume 45, Issue 8, pages 818-826, 14 JUL 2011 DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.03988.x http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.03988.x/full#f1 20
  21. 21. (Meta) Analysis Phase 21
  22. 22. 22 Problem(s) Solution(s) Process 1. Student dissatisfaction with LMS organization 2. Student dissatisfaction with educational materials 3. Faculty resistance to facilitation and design improvements 1. LMS organization cleaner and consistent across courses 2. Educational materials more student-centered and easy-to- digest 3. Faculty more engaging and interactive 1. Focus groups with students and faculty on reorganization 2. ID reviews educational materials and offers specific feedback to instructors 3. ID meets with faculty, observes teaching and collaborates on improvement
  23. 23. 23 Evaluation Data (Raw) ‘Pretty’ Evaluation Data
  24. 24. 24 Examples of Feedback from ID
  25. 25. 25 Team-Based Learning
  26. 26. 26 Feedback Loops • Course Reviews • Summary by Course Director • Graduation questionnaire (AAMC) • Student feedback • Evaluation data • Instructional Designer feedback • Board scores Photo by https://www.flickr.com/photos/dbrekke/159390694 via Create Commons License
  27. 27. Faculty Development Learning Environment • Best Practices in Learner-Centered Instruction • Creating Effective Independent Learning Assignments • Best Practices in Creating Powerful PowerPoint Presentations • Setting the Stage: Meeting LCME Standard 6.3 • Hands on with Explain Everything • Poll Everywhere • Approaches to the Flipped Classroom: Achieve Student Engagement with Active Learning Techniques • http://www.medicine.uic.edu/education/faculty_learning___environment 27
  28. 28. Educational Methods: Ways of Delivering Content • Readings • Lecture • Discussion • Reflection • Small group • Team-based learning • Standardized patients • Clinical experiences • Etc. 28
  29. 29. 29
  30. 30. Blackboard Please, no. Please, no. Yes, please! Yes, please! 30
  31. 31. Observation of Lecture 31
  32. 32. Flipped Classroom & Active Learning https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wont2v_LZ1E Active Learning Exercises • Teamwork • Debates • Self-reflection • Case Studies / Poll Everywhere • Team-Based Learning • Problem-Based Learning McLaughlin, et al. (2014). The flipped classroom: A course redesign to foster learning and engagement in a health professions school. Academic Medicine (89),2. 236-242. Flipped Classroom • Instructors prerecord lectures and post online for students to watch • Class time is dedicated to student- centered learning activities 32
  33. 33. Team-Based Learning (TBL) 33
  34. 34. 34 essons Learned Through This Process • Objective view! • First year, ID reviewed evaluations and then looked at materials • Second year +, ID does analysis and then looks at evaluations
  35. 35. 35 Plans for the Future • Use of Tableau for data visualization • Shorter evaluations • Evaluation sampling Photo from https://www.flickr.com/photos/buckaroobay/3721809183 via Creative Commons License
  36. 36. Max Anderson, MLIS, MS Instructional Designer & Apple Certified Education Trainer University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago Office of Curricular Affairs max@uic.edu 312-996-5898 36

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  • NealWeber1

    Jan. 22, 2018

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