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It’s getting crowded!
A critical view of what crowdsourcing can
do for terminology as a discipline.
EAFT Barcelona 2014
Ba...
Scenario
• IT industry
• Strong focus on tools/functionality
• Documentation in a TMS
• Controlled language
• Translation ...
Terminology work
• What can the crowd do?
• Help with coining new terms or names
• Vote on term/name suggestions
• Comment...
WHAT’S OLD, WHAT’S NEW,
WHAT’S OUR NEED
Terminologists and the crowd
• No change
• Terminology work has never been a
solitary endeavor.
• Change
• The type of peo...
Expert
• A subject matter expert:
• Has a documented history of working in the
area for which they are an expert;
• Has do...
Experts et al
• Who are the folks that we need to involve
in the terminology work for a software
program?
• Yes, subject m...
Terminologists and the speed
of change
“We used to manage about two concepts
a day because we had to go on field trips
to ...
Needs
• We need input.
• We need it fast.
• We need it from different audiences
(experts <-> users).
EXAMPLES
Harvesting subject matter
expertise
• System: J.D. Edwards terminology
management system
• When: Created in 1998
• Medium:...
Coining new names
• Product: Microsoft Windows Vista
(2006)
• What: German names for new games
• Medium: SharePoint site
•...
Finding target language
equivalents
• Product: Windows 8
• What: Names/terms
• Medium: Microsoft Terminology Forum
• Parti...
Example
Hype gone wrong!
• The crowd needs to be provided with correct and
useful input.
• A terminological definition
• Mandatory...
TOOLS
What do TMSs need?
What do TMSs need?
• Commenting features
• Voting features
• Statistics and evaluation
• Polished!
• Terminologists deal w...
Conclusion
• Push for new functionality in TMSs
• Awareness for terminology issues
• Access to input
• Be adamant that a t...
It’s getting crowded! A critical view of what crowdsourcing can do for terminology as a discipline
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It’s getting crowded! A critical view of what crowdsourcing can do for terminology as a discipline

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It’s getting crowded! A critical view of what crowdsourcing can do for terminology as a discipline
Barbara Inge Karsch - BIK Terminology
VII EAFT Terminology Summit. Barcelona, 27-28 november 2014

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It’s getting crowded! A critical view of what crowdsourcing can do for terminology as a discipline

  1. 1. It’s getting crowded! A critical view of what crowdsourcing can do for terminology as a discipline. EAFT Barcelona 2014 Barbara Inge Karsch
  2. 2. Scenario • IT industry • Strong focus on tools/functionality • Documentation in a TMS • Controlled language • Translation processes • Prescriptive approach • Vs. terminology work to drive, e.g. SEO
  3. 3. Terminology work • What can the crowd do? • Help with coining new terms or names • Vote on term/name suggestions • Comment on terminological entries • E.g. making definitions more precise • …
  4. 4. WHAT’S OLD, WHAT’S NEW, WHAT’S OUR NEED
  5. 5. Terminologists and the crowd • No change • Terminology work has never been a solitary endeavor. • Change • The type of people we work with has changed.
  6. 6. Expert • A subject matter expert: • Has a documented history of working in the area for which they are an expert; • Has done the work; • Exhibits the highest level of expertise in performing a specialized job, task, or skill within the organization; • Has in-depth knowledge of the subject. • Has bona fide expert knowledge about what it takes to do a particular job. • Understands a business process or area well enough to answer questions from people in other groups.
  7. 7. Experts et al • Who are the folks that we need to involve in the terminology work for a software program? • Yes, subject matter experts • Product managers • Users • …
  8. 8. Terminologists and the speed of change “We used to manage about two concepts a day because we had to go on field trips to see our SMEs.” (Hendrik Kockaert, former EU Terminologist)
  9. 9. Needs • We need input. • We need it fast. • We need it from different audiences (experts <-> users).
  10. 10. EXAMPLES
  11. 11. Harvesting subject matter expertise • System: J.D. Edwards terminology management system • When: Created in 1998 • Medium: TMS had integrated commenting and workflow functionality • Outcome: Feedback from experts in subsidiaries and others
  12. 12. Coining new names • Product: Microsoft Windows Vista (2006) • What: German names for new games • Medium: SharePoint site • Participants: German native speakers, MVPs who had special technical knowledge, but also knew the audience • Outcome: 85% of the final names originated from participant ideas
  13. 13. Finding target language equivalents • Product: Windows 8 • What: Names/terms • Medium: Microsoft Terminology Forum • Participants: Open to anyone • Problem: • Terminological data not prepared well • Outcome: [Some] crowd input wasn’t useful.
  14. 14. Example
  15. 15. Hype gone wrong! • The crowd needs to be provided with correct and useful input. • A terminological definition • Mandatory terminological data • Each project needs a specific crowd. • The crowd cannot do prescriptive terminology work. • User interface can’t do it all, but it is important, too.
  16. 16. TOOLS
  17. 17. What do TMSs need?
  18. 18. What do TMSs need? • Commenting features • Voting features • Statistics and evaluation • Polished! • Terminologists deal with dozens of entries a day.
  19. 19. Conclusion • Push for new functionality in TMSs • Awareness for terminology issues • Access to input • Be adamant that a terminologist be part of the process

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