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Social and Emotional Health for Families with Children Birth to Age 8

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Social and Emotional Health for Families with Children Birth to Age 8

  1. 1. Social and Emotional Health For  Families  with  Children  Birth  to  Age  8   Brought  to  you  by:                                                                                                           the  Michigan  Great  Start  Systems  Team    
  2. 2. Our Objectives Learn  what  Social  and  Emo2onal  Health  Is     Iden2fy  Simple  Strategies  to  Support  the   Social  and  Emo2onal  Health  of  Children  Birth   up  to  Age  8  
  3. 3. What Skills Do Children Need to Succeed?
  4. 4. When Can We Start?
  5. 5. Social Health Trust Show Kindness Enjoy Others Make and Keep Friends Form Relationships Seek Out Connections
  6. 6. Emotional Health Express Emotions Manage Strong Feelings Turn to Caregivers When Unsure Calm Down Safely Work Through Conflicts  
  7. 7. Explore  and  Learn!   Social   Emo?onal  
  8. 8. Ready to Learn Children  do  well  in  school  if  they  can:   •  Get  along  with  others   •  Make  friends   •  Share  and  take  turns   •  Care  about  how  other  people  feel   •  Communicate  feelings   •  Calm  themselves  when  upset   •  Ask  for  what  they  need    
  9. 9. Reflection Do  You  Want  Your  Child  To:     "   Like  school  and  be  eager  to  learn?   "   Have  self-­‐confidence?   "   Form  and  keep  healthy  rela?onships?   "   Bounce  back  from  life’s  disappointments?  
  10. 10. Is My Child Ready to Learn?
  11. 11. Young Infants (birth to 12 months) •  Cry,  coo  and  smile   •  Look  at  faces   •  Accept  comfort          from  a  familiar  adult     •  Seek  comfort   •  Show  excitement   •  Show  curiosity  about   other  people    
  12. 12. Older Infants (12 months to 18 months) •  Explore  with  enthusiasm   •  Are  curious  about  other  people   •  Laugh  out  loud   •  Enjoy  books,  songs  and  simple                                                                                               games   •  Express  many  feelings                                                                                                                                 (sad,  happy,  scared,  angry,  etc.)    
  13. 13. Toddlers (18 months to 3 years) •  Show  shyness  in  unfamiliar   places   •  Smile  and  laugh   •  Enjoy  simple  books  and                                             games   •  Are  playful  with  others  
  14. 14. Preschoolers (Age 3-5) •  Begin  to  show  feelings  for  others   •  Express  many  feelings  (sad,  happy,  scared,  angry,   etc.)   •  Listen  to  gentle  reminders   •  Accept  changes  in  rou?nes   •  Try  new  things   •  Show  curiosity  about  people  and  things   •  Make  up  imaginary  games  and  may  enjoy   imaginary  play  with  others   •  Ask  many  ques?ons:  who,  what,  where,  when,   why,  how?    
  15. 15. School Age (5 up to Age 8) •  Begin  to  work  independently   •  Start  to  see  the  point-­‐of-­‐view  of  others     •  Show  respect  and  kindness  to  others     •  Develop  and  keep  friendships   •  Think  through  their  ac?ons   •  Talk  through  problems  to  solve  them   •  Enjoy  challenges   •  Focus  aQen?on  and  take  the  ?me  needed  to   complete  tasks    
  16. 16. What Can I do To Grow Children Social and Emotional Skills?
  17. 17. Birth to Age 5 Strategies 1.  Gently  hold  and  cuddle  your  child  oSen.   2.  Respond  to  your  child’s  efforts  to  communicate   with  you.       3.  Enrich  your  child’s  daily  rou?nes.       4.  Follow  your  child’s  lead.  Join  her  in  one-­‐on-­‐one   play  and  talk  with  her  about  her  ac?vi?es   whenever  possible.   5.  Gently  guide  your  child  through  social  situa?ons.   6.  Be  sure  your  expecta?ons  match  what  your  child  is   socially  and  emo?onally  ready  to  do.    
  18. 18. 1.  Be  consistent.     2.  Be  open  and  honest  with  your  child.       3.  Model  the  words  and  ac?ons  you  want  to  see  in  your  child.       4.  Get  involved.     5.  Let  your  child  make  mistakes.       6.  Show  affec?on.       7.  Encourage  responsibility  and  independence.       8.  Help  your  child  speak  up  for  herself.         Age 5-8 Strategies
  19. 19. All Ages! 1.  Celebrate  your  child’s  strengths.         2.  When  your  child  “acts  up,”  try  to  uncover  the  real   reason  for  her  behavior.   3.  Do  not  let  your  child  witness  family  violence.  Do  not   let  anyone  physically  abuse  or  hurt  your  child  with   words.   4.  Take  care  of  your  own  social-­‐emo?onal  health.    
  20. 20. Positive Guidance Infants            Safety     Toddlers  and  Preschoolers      Limits,  Consistency     School-­‐Aged  Children      Problem-­‐Solving       Social  and  Emo2onal  Skills  Take   Prac2ce!  
  21. 21. Taking Care of Your Children Means Taking Care of….
  22. 22. Thank You for Attending Social and Emotional Health For  Families  with  Children  Birth  to  Age  8   Brought  to  you  by:                                                                                                           the  Michigan  Great  Start  Systems  Team    

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