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Asturian 
Horreo 
IES El Batán 
Department of Technology
Horreo 
● A movable construction used to protect 
the harvest from moisture and mice.
History 
● The oldest references to horreos appear in roman 
documents from the 1st century b. C. The word “horreo” 
comes...
Structure 
● The horreo is mainly made from chestnut wood but 
some parts must be made from stone. Depending 
on the area,...
Base 
● The horreo rests on four or six pillars called “pegoyos”. 
They are upon four stones partially digged into the 
gr...
Stairs 
● “Subidoria” is the name of 
the stairs, made usually 
from stone. They make a 
massive structure apart 
from the...
Body 
● “Colondras” are wooden 
boards that fit on the 
trabes to make the walls 
of the horreo. 
● “Liño” is the name of ...
Roof 
● “Aguilones” are the beams that make the edges of the 
roof. The “tijeras” is the group of logs that support the 
s...
Corners 
● Form the ends of the trabes to the ends of aguilones 
there are eight wooden bars called “tentemozos”. 
Tentemo...
Indoor & Top 
● From liño to liño there are a group of thin beams called 
“durmientes” and “vigas del quesu”. They are the...
Balcony 
● From 17th century some horreos have their 
“corredor”, a balcony that surrounds the 
main body.
Roof 
Materials 
● Roof materials may vary among straw, 
slate or, most commonly, Arabic roof tiles.
Roof Materials 
Distribution 
● Roof style depends on a geographic 
distribution troughout Asturias, shown 
approximately ...
Movable 
● Every part of an Asturian horreo is 
detachable, so an horreo isn't considered 
as a building, and can be sold ...
Decoration 
● It's usual to find some Celtic symbols and 
carvings on the horreo walls.
Conclusion 
● Asturian horreos are one important part of 
Asturian country landscape, specific in 
shape and structure, a ...
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Asturian Horreo

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A brief study of the Asturian Horreo, a traditional structure used as barn built upon four or six pillars, to avoid moisture and mice.

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Asturian Horreo

  1. 1. Asturian Horreo IES El Batán Department of Technology
  2. 2. Horreo ● A movable construction used to protect the harvest from moisture and mice.
  3. 3. History ● The oldest references to horreos appear in roman documents from the 1st century b. C. The word “horreo” comes from latin “horreum”, barn. ● Horreos are represented for the first time in a codex form 13th century. ● The oldest detailed description of an Asturian horreo was written by the Asturian writer and politician Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos in 1792. ● The amount of horreos grew up during Renaissance. In the 17th century a new form is developed: the “panera” with six pillars and a rectangular shape. ● Along the 18th century the new horreos and paneras start to have a balcony all around them: the “corredor”.
  4. 4. Structure ● The horreo is mainly made from chestnut wood but some parts must be made from stone. Depending on the area, roof materials can be Arabic roof tile, slate or straw.
  5. 5. Base ● The horreo rests on four or six pillars called “pegoyos”. They are upon four stones partially digged into the ground called “pilpayos”. On the pegoyos we can see the “muelas”, a flat slate stone put there to prevent the mice from getting into the horreo. Finally a wooden block called “taza” prepares the place for the main beams. These four elements work under compression. ● The “trabes” are the main support of the rest of the horreo. They are four square-shaped wooden beams with half lap joints at their ends. Trabes are subjected to flexure.
  6. 6. Stairs ● “Subidoria” is the name of the stairs, made usually from stone. They make a massive structure apart from the horreo. ● There is a big gap between the end of the stairs and the floor of the horreo to avoid rodents jumping from the ground. ● “Tenobia” or “tenovia” is the footstep fixed to the trabe side.
  7. 7. Body ● “Colondras” are wooden boards that fit on the trabes to make the walls of the horreo. ● “Liño” is the name of the beam that lay on them. ● The “sobigaño” is a wooden beam that goes side to side under the “pontas” or “sollas”, the boards that make the floor of the horreo. Sobigaños work on flexure. ● The door is usually south-oriented. The door itself and colondras at their sides are sometimes decorated with Celtic carvings or drawings.
  8. 8. Roof ● “Aguilones” are the beams that make the edges of the roof. The “tijeras” is the group of logs that support the system of beams on the middle of liños. ● “Tercias” and “carríos” are used to make the base of the roof. The bottom of the roof is finished with the “agüero” or “aguadero”.
  9. 9. Corners ● Form the ends of the trabes to the ends of aguilones there are eight wooden bars called “tentemozos”. Tentemozos are not present if the horreo has a corredor.
  10. 10. Indoor & Top ● From liño to liño there are a group of thin beams called “durmientes” and “vigas del quesu”. They are the only elements that work on tension. ● “Moño”, “obispo”, “curuto” or “ontera” is the piece of stone or wood that forms the top of the roof.
  11. 11. Balcony ● From 17th century some horreos have their “corredor”, a balcony that surrounds the main body.
  12. 12. Roof Materials ● Roof materials may vary among straw, slate or, most commonly, Arabic roof tiles.
  13. 13. Roof Materials Distribution ● Roof style depends on a geographic distribution troughout Asturias, shown approximately in the map below. Thatched roof is limited to a very small area on southwestern mountains.
  14. 14. Movable ● Every part of an Asturian horreo is detachable, so an horreo isn't considered as a building, and can be sold apart form the land where is built on.
  15. 15. Decoration ● It's usual to find some Celtic symbols and carvings on the horreo walls.
  16. 16. Conclusion ● Asturian horreos are one important part of Asturian country landscape, specific in shape and structure, a traditional construction used as granary.

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