Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.
THE
HEARST
TOWER
ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS
1Building Science
ENERGY
Energy, in building science, is a fuel or resource in building science used to operate machinery,...
2Building Science
THE HEARST TOWER
Architects: Foster and Partners
Location: Midtown Manhattan, New York City,
New York, U...
3Building Science
INTRODUCTION
Hearst Tower is a 46-storey office tower whose
landmark six-story cast stone base is orname...
4Building Science
Key Details
 First building in New York City to receive a LEED® Gold certification for New
Construction...
5Building Science
The glass and steel addition sits atop a six-story cast
stone base, which was designed by Joseph Urban i...
6Building Science
Foster and Partners pushed the boundaries with their long list of environmental considerations
which lea...
7Building Science
Another obvious way to bring down the financial and
environmental costs of the skyscraper is by optimizi...
8Building Science
BUILDING TECHNOLOGY
Victor Ganzi, president and CEO of PM's parent
company, Hearst, approved the tower j...
9Building Science
WATER CIRCULATION
Engineers tested the design of the lobby's 30-ft.-high waterfall using a model (above)...
10Building Science
CURTAIN WALL
The diagrid pattern intrinsic to the tower's basic construction
is traced on the exterior ...
11Building Science
BUILDING MATERIALS
The tower – designed by the architect Norman Foster is 46 stories tall, standing 182...
12Building Science
Exterior lighting by WE:EF; controls by Lutron
Acoustic ceilings by USG and Decoustics;
interior lighti...
13Building Science
The atrium features escalators which run through a 3-story water sculpture titled Icefall, a wide
water...
14Building Science
Structure
Obstructed views on the west side of the site forced the architects to move the elevator core...
15Building Science
16Building Science
ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Energy-saving features in the tower include:
 Glass coating to reduce solar radiatio...
17Building Science
Site + Climate:
The building envelope was designed to limit glare from low angle sun during the early m...
18Building Science
The design preserved the façade of the existing structure and establishes a creative dialogue
between t...
19Building Science
20Building Science
21Building Science
SUSTAINABILITY POLICY
"We can not ignore the damage that our buildings inflict on the natural environme...
22Building Science
BIBLIOGRAPHY
o www.fosterandpartners.com
o http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hearst_Tower_(Manhattan)
o www....
Próxima SlideShare
Cargando en…5
×

Hearst Tower

9.718 visualizaciones

Publicado el

Study of the "Hearst Tower" by Norman Foster

Publicado en: Ingeniería
  • Inicia sesión para ver los comentarios

Hearst Tower

  1. 1. THE HEARST TOWER ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS
  2. 2. 1Building Science ENERGY Energy, in building science, is a fuel or resource in building science used to operate machinery, for heating and cooling puposes. The sources of energy are broadly classified into two main groups: Renewable and Non- renewable Renewable Energy Renewable energy is the energy which is generated from natural sources i.e. sun, wind, rain, tides and can be generated again and again as and when required. They are available in plenty and by far most the cleanest sources of energy available on this planet. For eg: energy that we receive from the sun can be used to generate electricity. Similarly, energy from wind, geothermal, biomass from plants, tides can be used to fulfill our daily energy demands Non-Renewable Energy Non-Renewable energy is the energy which is taken from the sources that are available on the earth in limited quantity and will vanish fifty-sixty years from now. Non-renewable sources are not environmental friendly and can have serious affect on our health. They are called non- renewable because they cannot be re-generated within a short span of time. Non-renewable sources exist in the form of fossil fuels, natural gas, oil and coal. Efficient energy use, sometimes simply called energy efficiency, is the goal to reduce the amount of energy required to provide products and services. For energy conservation and efficiency, we can use several methods. They are mainly classified as:  Active energy  Passive energy Energy efficiency has proved to be a cost-effective strategy for building economies without necessarily increasing energy consumption.
  3. 3. 2Building Science THE HEARST TOWER Architects: Foster and Partners Location: Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA Architect: Foster and Partners Project Design: Norman Foster Structural Engineer: WSP Cantour Seinuk Construction: Turner Construction Project Year: 2006 Hearst Tower is the world headquarters of the Hearst Corporation, bringing together for the first time their numerous publications and communications companies under one roof, including, among others, Cosmopolitan, Esquire Marie Claire, Harper's Bazaar, Good Housekeeping and Seventeen. Hearst Tower was the first skyscraper to break ground in New York City after September 11, 2001. The building received the 2006 Emporis Skyscraper Award, citing it as the best skyscraper in the world completed that year. The original cast stone facade has been preserved in the new design as a designated Landmark site. Originally built as the base for a proposed skyscraper, the construction of the tower was postponed due to the Great Depression. The new tower addition was completed nearly eighty years later. The first “green” high rise office building to be completed in New York City, Hearst Tower accurately represents the talent and intellect that drives Foster and Partners toward innovative and ground breaking design. The building's symmetrically jagged silhouette is easily recognizable in its surroundings. The diagrid facade comprised of triangulated steel frame was designed to use 21% less steel than traditional buildings of it's type. Also impressive is the statistic which states that 90% of the 10,480 tons of steel used is derived from recycled material.
  4. 4. 3Building Science INTRODUCTION Hearst Tower is a 46-storey office tower whose landmark six-story cast stone base is ornamented with columns and allegorical statues, while the tower portions’ diagrid cladding is profiled stainless steel and low-E clear glass. Hearst Tower is located on 8th Avenue between 56th and 57th Streets. The former six-story headquarters building was commissioned by its founder, William Randolph Hearst, and awarded to the architect Joseph Urban. The building was completed in 1928. Because the building is a designated landmark site, the original cast stone facade has been preserved in the new. Originally built as the base for a proposed skyscraper, the construction of the tower was postponed due to the Great Depression. The new tower addition was completed nearly 80 years later. The tower— designed by the architect Norman Foster, developed by Tishman Speyer, and constructed by Turner Construction—is 46 stories tall, standing 597 feet with 856,000 square feet of office space. The uncommon triangular framing pattern (also known as a diagrid) required 10,480 tons of structural steel—20% less than a conventional steel frame. Hearst Tower was the first skyscraper to break ground in New York City after September 11, 2001. A number of amenities were addded to better serve tenants, including restroom upgrades, workstations, a wellness center, ongoing seminars and events on various health issues, the Club (a fitness facility), Café 57 (a 340-seat corporate cafeteria), a newsstand, function spaces (including the Joseph Urban Theater and the 44th floor), state-of-the-art technology, Studio D (a professional photography studio), and Studio 57 (a full HD broadcast studio). All 80 conference rooms on the office floors are equipped with high-standard AV technology and are set to “plug and play.” There is IPTV for employees to view television programming or a live broadcast of a presentation taking place in the Joseph Urban Theater, as well as a media lab and IT training rooms. Located two blocks south of Central Park, the building is within walking distance of Midtown Manhattan and all that New York City has to offer. The property is easily accessible by the Columbus Circle subway station and several NYC Metropolitan Bus routes.
  5. 5. 4Building Science Key Details  First building in New York City to receive a LEED® Gold certification for New Construction™ - Commerical Interiors™  Diagrid frame contains roughly 20% less steel than would a conventional perimeter frame, saving approximately 2,000 tons of steel  Each triangle in the diagrid is four stories tall, or 54 feet  Over 90% of its structural steel contains recycled material  Daylight sensors control lighting and reduce energy use  95% of office space has daylighting; 80% has views  Over one mile of glass office fronts  15 passenger elevators utilizing the Schindler Miconic 10 destination dispatch vertical transportation system  High-speed fiber-optic data transmission; fully Wi-Fi enabled  Nine-story atrium lobby with a six-story fresco, Riverlines, and a three-story glass water feature, Icefall Sustainability  LEED® Gold for Existing Buildings™  LEED® for Existing Building: Platinum  In 2011, Hearst Tower achieved an ENERGY STAR® score of 88. Efforts are now under way to improve the score further by ensuring that all possible measures are being taken to reduce energy consumption.
  6. 6. 5Building Science The glass and steel addition sits atop a six-story cast stone base, which was designed by Joseph Urban in 1928 at a cost of $2 million. Founded by William Randolph Hearst, the 40,000 square feet was designated a Landmark site during the initial designs of the addition. The new tower stands 46 stories tall, housing 80,000 square meters of office space. Hearst Tower entered the scene at a very important historical moment in American history, as it was the first skyscraper to be built after September 11, 2011. Foster and Partners' dedication to incomparable design becomes clearer with each project, with the Hearst Tower receiving the 2006 Emporis Skyscraper Award as the best skyscraper of the year in the world. New York City’s Hearst Tower is largely made from recycled steel and uses rainwater for 50% of its needs
  7. 7. 6Building Science Foster and Partners pushed the boundaries with their long list of environmental considerations which lead to the designation of Hearst Tower as New York City's first LEED Gold certified skyscraper. Heat conductive limestone paves the atrium floor, covering polyethylene tubing that circulates water year round to help control the ambient temperature of the building. During the rain, water is collected on the roof and then stored in the basement. This becomes key in the floor tubing, irrigation, and the water sculpture in the lobby. Icefall, the water sculpture that reaches three stories high, is constructed with thousands of glass panels and also contributes to the thermal conditions of the building by cooling and humidifying the air using the recycled rainwater. Hearst Tower remains at a comfortable temperature for a majority of the year by natural ventilation.
  8. 8. 7Building Science Another obvious way to bring down the financial and environmental costs of the skyscraper is by optimizing the amount of natural light flowing through the building. To maximize the penetration of light, Foster limited the amount of interior walls so as to block less light. Light sensors are used to measure amounts of natural light and react automatically depending on what is needed.
  9. 9. 8Building Science BUILDING TECHNOLOGY Victor Ganzi, president and CEO of PM's parent company, Hearst, approved the tower just one month after 9/11, committing to keep its headquarters and 2000 local employees in New York. The project posed a unique challenge for British architect Norman Foster, internationally acclaimed for graceful, modernist designs. The contemporary skyscraper was to sit atop the original Hearst building, a six-story 1928 art deco landmark. Foster's solution was to leave the limestone facade intact, but to carve out the building's center to create a vast atrium, and then lift the new tower above it with huge steel-and-concrete beams. The resulting nine-story interior, with its 30-ft.-high waterfall and clerestory windows, promises to be one of the most dramatic spaces in New York. "The concept," Foster says, "was to create an 'urban living room.'" The tower's distinctive framework is a "diagrid" of interlinked triangles, so structurally efficient that the building uses 20 percent less steel than conventional designs require. Floor-to-ceiling windows cast light on 95 percent of the occupied space. Thanks to dozens of energy-saving features, from motion sensors to high-efficiency ventilation equipment, the total energy consumption of the building will be 22 percent less than that of a typical skyscraper of comparable size-a savings of 2 million kilowatt-hours of electricity a year. Elements throughout the building reduce the use of resources: Carpets, ceiling tiles and furnishings were made with recycled materials; rainwater collected in 14,000-gal. tanks will humidify the atrium. The tower is on track to become the first commercial skyscraper in New York to receive a "gold" rating under the U.S. Green Building Council's program for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design.
  10. 10. 9Building Science WATER CIRCULATION Engineers tested the design of the lobby's 30-ft.-high waterfall using a model (above). The full- scale version flanks both sides of the escalator, contributing to aesthetics and important building functions. Replenished by rainwater collected on the roof, the water feature helps maintain an ideal relative humidity of 30 to 50 percent, depending on the season, and cuts the atrium's summer air-conditioning load by 5 percent. Water circulating through polyethylene pipes embedded in the atrium floor provides radiant heating and cooling (below). In winter, this system warms the granite floor to 78 F, supplying 36 percent of the atrium's heating. During the summer, it chills the floor to 72 F, supplying 10 percent of the atrium's cooling. GOING UP An escalator will lead employees from the street-level entrance to the third-floor atrium level. Manufactured in one piece, the 56-ft.-long escalator had to be hoisted into the gutted interior of the 1928 building while the roof was off. It sat protected by plywood for more than a year before it was installed. Water feature
  11. 11. 10Building Science CURTAIN WALL The diagrid pattern intrinsic to the tower's basic construction is traced on the exterior by stainless steel cladding. "By expressing the structure in a sculptural way and casing it in reflective stainless steel, it becomes the identity of the tower," Foster says, "especially from a distance." Installing the cladding required a custom-built, double-tier monorail scaffold system that could move side to side as well as up and down. Because of the building's shape, the installation of windows proved tricky, too. "On any given floor you can have as many as 30 different window configurations," says Syed Alkarimi, the architectural coordinator in charge of the facade. The double-pane glass has a low-E coating to let visible light through while reflecting heat-causing wavelengths. Laminate on the inner pane is twice as thick as is typical; it should remain intact in the event of a disaster, while the outer pane is designed to shatter. MULTIFACETED The 46-story edifice incorporates the original Hearst building, finished in 1928, which was intended to support a tower that was never built. "The challenge was to respond, at some 70 years' remove, to the original vision of the building," Foster says. He did so by creating a transition zone of clerestory glass that floods the atrium with daylight. "By lifting the tower up 10 floors, we achieved a separation from the original building, and the tower appears to float above it." Because there are no columns on the perimeter, the corners instead form eight-story-high "bird's mouths." Cleaning them requires a custom-built scaffold. The system has a raised track on the roof and articulating arms to move the platforms in and out with the glass. "It's like a ride at Disneyland," Borland says. Adds Alkarimi, "It's a little scarier than that."
  12. 12. 11Building Science BUILDING MATERIALS The tower – designed by the architect Norman Foster is 46 stories tall, standing 182 m (597 ft) with 80,000 m² (856,000 ft²) of office space. The uncommon triangular framing pattern (also known as a diagrid) required 9,500 metric tons (10,480 tons) of structural steel – reportedly about 20% less than a conventional steel frame. The Hearst Tower has a host of features that contribute to it's gold LEED rating, including low- emitting glass, light sensors to control the amount of artificial light used based on the amount of natural light available from outside, high-efficiency HVAC systems, Energy Star appliances, and the use of outside air for cooling and ventilation during 75 percent of the year. Rainwater collection and reuse provides about half of the watering needs while also humidifying and chilling the 10-story atrium as necessary. Low-vapor and low- toxicity paints are used on walls and concrete surfaces, and furnishings are formaldehyde-free. Floors and ceilings were manufactured with recycled content and wood from sustainable forests. The Hearst Tower is designed to be 26% more energy-efficient than a standard office building. The tower is supported by 12 raking mega-columns. Exterior cladding by Permasteelisa with Avesta linen- finish stainless steel and Guardian Luxguard glass
  13. 13. 12Building Science Exterior lighting by WE:EF; controls by Lutron Acoustic ceilings by USG and Decoustics; interior lighting by Zumtobel Demountable partitions by IOC; pin-up wall by Maharam Carnegie
  14. 14. 13Building Science The atrium features escalators which run through a 3-story water sculpture titled Icefall, a wide waterfall built with thousands of glass panels, which cools and humidifies the lobby air Hearst Tower is the first green building completed in New York City, with a number of environmental considerations built into the plan. The floor of the atrium is paved with heat conductive limestone. Polyethylene tubing is embedded under the floor and filled with circulating water for cooling in the summer and heating in the winter. Rain collected on the roof is stored in a tank in the basement for use in the cooling system, to irrigate plants and for the water sculpture in the main lobby. The building was constructed using 80% recycled steel. Overall, the building has been designed to use 25% less energy than the minimum requirements for the city of New York, and earned a gold designation from the United States Green Building Council’s LEED certification program. The atrium features escalators which run through a 3-story water sculpture titled Icefall, a wide waterfall built with thousands of glass panels, which cools and humidifies the lobby air. The water element is complemented by a 70-foot (21.3 m) tall fresco painting entitled Riverlines by artist Richard Long.
  15. 15. 14Building Science Structure Obstructed views on the west side of the site forced the architects to move the elevator core from the center to the west side of the building. However, by doing this, it meant that the east side of the facade may have been left unstable and vulnerable to lateral wind forces. The solution was either a hefty moment frame or a visually and physically lighter diagrid. The diagrid solution reduces the total amount of steel by 20 percent (then a conventional steel frame)while increasing structural rigidity and reducing weight. It also has the effect of allowing 40 foot spans, maximizing column, free space and permitting the elimination of corner supports. The structure utilizes an impressive 85 percent of recycled steel. Climate-Control System, Reflective Pavers, Low-E Glazing & Sensors The climate control system incorporates “free air-cooling”, using filtered outside air without temperature adjustment 75 percent of the year. Reflective pavers are utilized to increase energy efficiency by reducing solar absorption in the in roof, while low-E coated glass ushers in daylight without heat-producing radiation. Sensors are used throughout the building to conserve both electricity and water.
  16. 16. 15Building Science
  17. 17. 16Building Science ENERGY EFFICIENCY Energy-saving features in the tower include:  Glass coating to reduce solar radiation and therefore cooling load - the glass has a special 'low-E' coating that allows for internal spaces to be flooded with natural light while keeping out the invisible solar radiation that causes heat  A limestone atrium floor with embedded polyethylene tubing for circulating water for cooling in the summer and heating in the winter  Sensors that control artificial light based on the amount of natural light  Motion sensors to turn off lights and computers when an area is unoccupied  High-efficiency heating and air-conditioning equipment that uses outside air for cooling and ventilation for 75% of the year  A roof that collects rainwater in a 14,000gal basement reclamation tank, which then replaces water lost to evaporation in the office air-conditioning system and feeds into a pumping system to irrigate plantings and trees inside and outside of the building  The 'Icefall,' a two-storey waterfall that chills the ten-storey atrium, drawing off warm- season heat using rainwater from the roof  Few internal walls and low workstation partitions to maximise natural light  Walls are coated with low-vapour paints  Low-toxicity furniture, finishes and carpeting have content that is recycled or harvested from sustainable forests  Concrete surfaces are treated with low-toxicity sealants
  18. 18. 17Building Science Site + Climate: The building envelope was designed to limit glare from low angle sun during the early morning and evenings. Form + Massing: The massing was predetermined by the footprint of the existing Hearst building. The design of the tower, sought to protect the existing podium, whilst extending the building with a distinctive new tower. Passive Design: To minimise solar gain, the building envelope contains high performance low emission glass, with integral roller blinds which can be used to reduce glare. The building is naturally overshadowed by the surrounding buildings so large skylights were used at the podium level to bring daylight into the atrium space. Environmental Systems: The atrium contains a radiant floor, a tempered water wall and temperature controlled walls. In the office spaces, an economiser cycle on the AHUs provide fresh air ventilation for 75% of year. Mobility + Connectivity: The design included an upgrade to the local subway station, and reinstated an entrance within the building, giving employees direct access to public transport. Materials + Waste: The diagrid structure uses 20 per cent less steel than a conventionally framed structure, and it was built using 85 per cent recycled steel. Locally sourced materials are used throughout. Water: Harvested rainwater from the roof is fed into a central tank and used for irrigation and to feed the water feature. This, alongside water efficient fixtures and fittings, has led to a 30% reduction in water usage compared to a typical building. Land + Ecology: The design ensured that all existing trees on site were protected, and to ensure their long term vitality, they are now irrigated through the rainwater harvesting system. Culture + Heritage:
  19. 19. 18Building Science The design preserved the façade of the existing structure and establishes a creative dialogue between the old and new. The forty-two-storey tower rises above the old building and has resulted in an award winning addition to the New York Sky Line. Wellbeing: At the base of the tower, there is a large atrium space for the building users. A water feature helps enhance the microclimate by thermally tempering the space, providing acoustic dampening and humidity control. Daylight floods the space through high level sky lights, helping to create a healthy, vibrant space. Prosperity: Local construction firms were chosen where possible, to enhance the local economy. In operation, the building has helped to regenerate the surrounding area. Performance in Use: First LEED Gold commercial office building in New York. Since completion it has gone on to achieve LEED Platinum for its operation and maintenance.
  20. 20. 19Building Science
  21. 21. 20Building Science
  22. 22. 21Building Science SUSTAINABILITY POLICY "We can not ignore the damage that our buildings inflict on the natural environment. As the consequences of our past inaction becomes ever more apparent, designing for a sustainable future becomes a necessity, not a choice. Sustainable design means doing the most with the least means. Following the logic of ‘less is more,’ it employs passive architectural means to reduce energy consumption, minimising the use of nonrenewable fuel and reducing the amount of pollution. Responsible sustainable design is not simply about individual buildings; it should be implemented at all scales - from product design to the design of cities. In the final analysis, sustainability is about good design. The higher the quality of design, and the more efficient the project is, the longer the project will have a role, and in sustainability terms, longevity is a good thing. The following Sustainability Policy outlines Foster + Partners’ approach to sustainable design." – Norman Foster
  23. 23. 22Building Science BIBLIOGRAPHY o www.fosterandpartners.com o http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hearst_Tower_(Manhattan) o www.hearst.com o www.sustainablecitiescollective.com o www.designbuild-network.com o www.building.co.uk o archnet.org o www.archdaily.com o www.slideshare.net

×