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Sustainable storm water management Presentation Slides

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Sustainable storm water management Presentation Slides

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Sustainable storm water management Presentation Slides

  1. 1. B U I L D I N G S E R V I C E S I GROUP MEMBER : DARREN TAN QUAN WEN LOH MUN TONG LEONG LI JING LEW QUO MING YEE JYH LIN TAM ZHAO WEI SUSTAINABLE STORMWATER MANAGEMANT
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION • Storm water are usually water from snow/ice or from nearby stream, river or runoff surface • Natural sentiment such as forest, the soil absorbs much of the stormwater. In developed place such as cities, unmanaged stormwater can create 2 types of problem. First problem would be flooding and water pollution. • Water pollution, is due to the impervious surface such as parking lots; road and building that the stormwater are unable to be absorbed by the ground. Therefore, generating more runoff than natural sentiment. Flooding is due the objects that are collected during rain. It will all be transported to a drain causing it to block it. • To combat stormwater, a storm drain is installed throughout the cities. It is designed to drain excessive rain from impervious surfaces.
  3. 3. SUSTAINABLE STORMWATER MANAGEMANT SYSTEM • Rainwater is absorbed and soaked into the ground and then it evaporates from the surface, taken up by plants, or finding its way slowly into rivers or streams. Any development will affect and make an impact to this environment and change the natural water cycle.
  4. 4. GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE & GRAY INFRASTRUCTURE Green infrastructure functioned as water management that protects, restores, or mimics the natural water cycle. Gray infrastructure is man-made designed to move urban storm-water away from the built environment. Both infrastructure are involved in stormwater management system.
  5. 5. GREEN ROOF Green roofs are a multi-layered system with living plants growing on roof top.The most typical built up includes roof deck, waterproofing layer, protection layers, drainage layer, filter sheet, growing substrate and vegetation. Green roofs enable rainfall infiltration and evapotranspiration of stored water. The vegetation and soil absorb and filter the water.
  6. 6. ADVANTAGES Provide a barrier of greenery that helps to protect the waterproof membrane underneath and thus increase the lifespan of the roof DISADVANTAGE S An increase in weight load (require more structural support to be implemented) MAINTENANCE • Litter removal may be required • Inspection and replacement of plants will be required on a regular basis
  7. 7. Pervious surfaces can be either porous or permeable. Porous surfacing is a surface that infiltrates water across the entire surface while permeable surfaces designed to allow storm-water runoff to filter through surface voids into an underlying stone reservoir for temporary storage or infiltration. PERVIOUS SURFACE
  8. 8. ADVANTAGES Reduced need for deep excavations for drainage, which can have significant cost benefits DISADVANTAGE S Risk of long-term clogging and weed growth if poorly maintained MAINTENANCE • Periodic vacuuming • Repair and patch surfaces with similar pervious materials
  9. 9. • Shallow, broad and vegetated channels • Allow storm water to slow down and go through the process of sedimentation, filtration, evapotranspiration and partially infiltration • Located along the roadway • Drain away through the soil within several hours or days • Check dams and berms - promote settling and infiltration. GRASSED SWALES
  10. 10. Wet Swales at Sue Donaldson Dry Swales at Delaware Department of Transportation There are two types of swales: WET SWALES treat storm water through physical and biological action DRY SWALES treat storm water through infiltration
  11. 11. WET SWALES DRY SWALES
  12. 12. ADVANTAGES Pollution and blockages are visible and easy to remove DISADVANTAGE S Limit the opportunities to use trees for landscaping MAINTENANCE • Removal of trash and debris regularly • Grass cutting and removal of cuttings • Clearing of inlets, culverts and outlets to avoid clogging
  13. 13. - contains plants that can survive in soil soaked with water - collect and slow the storm-water runoff - increase the infiltration into the soil - practice mimics natural hydrology by the process of infiltrating, evaporating and transpiring - commonly found on private properties How it works? 1. Water settle on the garden surface then soak through the plants and filter media 2. Sediments are trapped on the surface of the garden 3. Soil and plant roots work together to filter the water naturally RAIN GARDENS
  14. 14. Greenest Street in America, Chicago
  15. 15. ADVANTAGES Can be designed to work in most soil types DISADVANTAGE S Not suitable for areas with steep slopes. MAINTENANCE • Vegetation management • Removal of trash and debris regularly • Inlet and outlet cleaning
  16. 16. - Similar with rain gardens - Specially designed and engineered to manage and treat stormwater runoff - Shallow landscape depressions which included soil mixes and control structures such as • under drains to aid the control of flow • catch basins to filter sediment • check dams to slow the water flow - Commonly found on commercial properties or any public areas BIORETENTION AREAS
  17. 17. Baltusrol Crescent, Melbourne
  18. 18. ADVANTAGES Provide wildlife habitats DISADVANTAGE S Require extra maintenance MAINTENANCE • Regular inspection • Removal of trash and debris regularly • Replacement of mulch layer • Vegetation management
  19. 19. DETENTION AND RETENTION PONDS DETENTION BASINS (DRY POND) • Open and flat areas of grass • Normally dry during low flow periods • Allow filtration and sedimentation process to take place • Provide temporary storage • Works by allowing a large basin area for water and the water slowly drains out through the outlet at the bottom as designed RETENTION PONDS (WET POND) • Open areas of shallow water • Accommodate water and provide temporary storage for excess water • Improve the quality of water through settling, often employed as flood control devices • Water level rises temporarily and retain a permanent pool of water • Allows large amounts of water to enter the pond and allows small amounts of water drains out through the outlet Detention Pond Retention Pond
  20. 20. ADVANTAGES Surrounding areas have vegetative buffer that can withstand dry or wet conditions. DISADVANTAGE S Breeding grounds for mosquitoes and other diseases MAINTENANCE • Removal of trash and debris regularly • Inlet and outlet cleaning • Vegetation management DETENTION POND
  21. 21. ADVANTAGES Provide wildlife habitats DISADVANTAGE S Negative water quality impacts if not properly designed MAINTENANCE • Removal of trash and debris regularly • Inlet and outlet cleaning • Vegetation management RETENTION POND
  22. 22. • Consists of shallow ponds and marshy areas, covered almost entirely in aquatic vegetation WETLANDS Treated by the process of Sedimentation Filtration Digestion Oxidation Reduction Absorption Precipitation
  23. 23. There are two types of wetlands: NATURAL WETLANDS filter the contaminated water running into the stream, river or ocean CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS filter the water flow from inlet pipe and gravel through wetland plants and flow out from outlet pipe and gravel for further treatment. Natural Wetlands at Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District Constructed Wetlands from Gold Coast City Council
  24. 24. NATURAL WETLANDS CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS
  25. 25. ADVANTAGES Can tolerate both great and small volumes of water DISADVANTAGE S Unable to treat highly toxic modern wastewater MAINTENANCE • Removal of trash and debris regularly • Inlet and outlet cleaning • Vegetation management to retain high vegetation coverage
  26. 26. RILLS AND CHANNELS • Allow to collect water, slow down and provide storage for slit and oil. • Outlets are designed as a mini oil separator, so it is very effective at treating pollution. • Allow water flows along with the variety of cross sections rills and channels
  27. 27. ADVANTAGES Very effective in water & pollution treatment DISADVANTAGE S Need to give careful consideration to crossings MAINTENANCE • Removal of trash and debris regularly • Routine maintenance • Intensive maintenance required one every five years
  28. 28. • Underground storage tank system is a storage tank with underground piping connected • Carry storm water from detention or retention ponds. • The system consists of storage structures, inlet and outlet pipes • Addition features at the inlet pipes helps to improve the water quality by removing floatable, oils and grease, and sediments. • Cooperate with other storm water system to achieve the best result. UNDERGROUND STORAGE
  29. 29. ADVANTAGES Protected damage from animals and natural disasters DISADVANTAGE S Relatively expensive due to their specialised construction MAINTENANCE • Inspection and prevention of leakage and spills • Clean up by soil and groundwater investigation and remediation • Corrosion protection for tanks and piping
  30. 30. • Consists of internal components which are permanent pool for sedimentation • Inlet and outlet pipes which able to create flow patterns and flow conditions that aids in sediments removal. • An underground storage structure smaller than underground storage tank system. HYDRODYNAMIC SEPARATORS
  31. 31. ADVANTAGES Space saving since it is installed underground DISADVANTAGE S Only can remove limited amounts of pollutants MAINTENANCE • Cleaning and disposal of sediments and oils • Removal of trash and debris regularly • Inspection and prevention of leakage or spills
  32. 32. STORMWATER MANAGEMENT ADVANTAGES CHEMICAL HOME PROTECTION ROAD SAFETY TECHNOLOGY
  33. 33. MAINTENANCE STORMWATER MANAGEMENT DISADVANTAGES DAMAGE ROOT SYSTEM
  34. 34. CASE STUDY UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA DULUTH
  35. 35. The University of Minnesota Duluth discharges storm-water to several waters, including Lake Superior and two trout streams. Lake Superior Trout Stream
  36. 36. WATERSHED The main portion of UMD campus is in three watersheds.
  37. 37. University of Minnesota Duluth have more than 60 preventative storm water features in place to treat the runoff to varying degrees before it discharges to streams.
  38. 38. WET PONDS Eric Clarke Pond Fire Hall Pond Rock Pond Swenson Science Research Pond
  39. 39. FILTRATION PONDS Lot L-3 Filtration Basins Ianni Hall Volleyball Court
  40. 40. Glensheen Plan SWALE Glensheen Parking Lot
  41. 41. Modifying soil surface by adding geo-grids, mesh, sand or rock to stabilize surface to prevent ponding. The gravel road surface of Rock Hill Road is replaced with geoweb mesh, and crushed rock or topsoil mixture to stabilize surface and prevent rutting. MODIFIED SOILS
  42. 42. RAIN GARDEN/ BIO-RETENTION PONDS The Lot B UMD Rain Garden was built to help protect Oregon Creek by slowing, cooling and filtering the runoff water from the adjacent parking lot. It was designed and engineered as a bioretention pond and is composed of plantings, a drain tile system, and a water level control system. Lot B UMD Rain Garden
  43. 43. The Rain Garden in University Minnesota Duluth is one third acre in size. It handles stormwater from 2.5 acres of Parking Lot B and can hold as much as 60,000 US gallons of water.
  44. 44. HYDRODYNAMI C SEPARATORS The UMD campus has installed hydrodynamic separator in LOT G, Sports Health Centre, Chester Park and Swenson Civil Engineering Centre to separate oils and solids from moving stormwater by gravity.
  45. 45. The parking lot was refurbished in 2004 to include an underground “vault” consisting of large diameter pipes to temporarily store stormwater parking lot runoff. Lot G, behind UMD Library UNDERGROUND TANK
  46. 46. For the past five years, University of Minnesota Duluth campus have had installed a few pervious pavement including concrete pavers, recycled rubber pavers and pervious surface. PERVIOUS SURFACES
  47. 47. The lower tier is a green roof that helps to insulate the building as well as curb storm water runoff. A view of the partial green roof from top of a stairwell in Civil Engineering. Bagley Outdoor Classroo GREEN ROOF
  48. 48. A majority of these plantings are in areas that would hold sod, a high maintenance method of landscaping. Low maintenance alternative plantings help to diversify the appearance of the campus as well as reduce carbon footprint. ALTERNATIVE PLANTINGS
  49. 49. Objective : To reduce the quantity and to improve the quality of storm water runoff. SWPPP requires SIX minimum control measures : 1. Public Education and Outreach 2. Public Involvement and Participation 3. Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination 4. Construction Storm Water Runoff Control 5. Post Construction Storm Water 6. Pollution Prevention and Good STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRAM
  50. 50. • Provide educational storm water resources for its campus and greater community • Protect and enhance the region’s shared water resources through storm water pollution prevention • UMD Educational materials : 1. Illicit Discharge Poster (2015) 2. Illicit Discharge Quiz Slideshow (2013) 1. PUBLIC EDUCATION AND OUTREACH
  51. 51. 2. PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT AND PARTICIPATION • UMD welcomes involvement from the public including the employees, students, and contractors that make up the campus community. • Strongly encourage the involvement in creation, implementation and evaluation. IDEAS : - Include storm-water information to be taught in classes - Welcome the assistance in reviewing their best management practices - Assistance in hands-on clean ups / special projects
  52. 52. 3. ILLICIT DISCHARGE DETECTION AND ELIMINATION Illicit discharge is any discharge to the municipal separate storm server system (MS4) that is not composed entirely of storm water. STEPS TAKEN BY UMD TO DETECT AND ELIMINATE ILLICIT DISCHARGES : • UMD has developed and continue to maintain storm sewer system maps. • Physical observations (odour, colour and condition) during stormwater outlet inspections. • Programs like the UMD Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures Plan can identify potential illicit discharges. • Building-by-building document allows the determination of potential interconnections for the buildings.
  53. 53. 4. CONSTRUCTION SITE RUNOFF CONTROL Sediment runoff rates from construction sites are typically 10-20 times greater than those of agricultural lands, and 1000-2000 times greater than those of forest lands. Hence, in time it may cause serious impact to water bodies. Cause: contractor flushes newly installed hydrant near an unprotected catch Effect: Sediment plumb in a nearby trout stream is polluted.
  54. 54. Hence, UMD construction projects are required to have provisional and sediment control measures incorporated in the design. The construction documents must identify relevant details as well as contractor execution and inspection responsibilities.
  55. 55. 5. POST CONSTRUCTION STORM WATER Post construction storm water has brought significant impact to water bodies. Prior planning and design can minimise pollutants and it’s the most cost- effective approach to storm water quality management. Examples: - A green roof on Bagley Outdoor Classroom designed to reduce storm water inputs to Tischer Creek.
  56. 56. 6. POLLUTION PREVENTION AND GOOD HOUSEKEEPING UMD is establishing a system of good housekeeping practices that recognise that the campus operates in an urban area.
  57. 57. POSSIBLE PROBLEMS & RECOMMENDATIONS
  58. 58. GREEN ROOF Problems Plant Selection • Type of plant factors in the performance of the green roof. • If chosen poorly, the plant would not be able to survive the climate • Maintenance would be costly as consistently require to change the plant Dead Plants
  59. 59. GREEN ROOF Recommendation • Species that are able to accumulate nutrients and use water effectively • Herbaceous Species - Tulbaghia Violacea • Shrubby Species - Leonotis Leonurus.
  60. 60. UNDERGROUND Problems • Allowing direct recharge of groundwater • Infiltration system underground would be affected hence restricting the movement of water.
  61. 61. UNDERGROUND Recommendation • Only soils which are suitable for infiltration able to allow a direct recharge • Acceptable soils for underground system include sand, sandy loam and loam. • Sandy soils are permeable while soils with clay should be avoided because it restricts the movement of water. Sand Sandy Loam
  62. 62. SWALES Problems • Not effective enough in reducing the bacteria levels and pollutants alone • Wet swales will be a nuisance by allowing mosquito breeding Polluted Swales
  63. 63. SWALES Recommendation • Check dams can be constructed with the swales • Prevent erosion and promote sedimentation by decreasing runoff volume, rate, and velocity • More effective at mitigating runoff quantity and quality than those without. Grass Swales with Rock Check
  64. 64. POND Problems Effectiveness of pollutant removal • Settling area being relative small hence harder to separate sediments. • Problems in Impede flow and trap remaining pollutants • Unable to remove pollutant alone Pond Infiltration System Problem
  65. 65. POND Recommendation • The addition of a sediment forebay increase the settling area for sediments. • Construction of shallow ledges along the edge to have aquatic plants that prevents the entering of flow and trapped pollutants.
  66. 66. CONCLUSION
  67. 67. THANK YOU

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