Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.

Dollymount flood wall review feb 2016 rev2

Report by independent expert on Dollymount Flood Defence

  • Sé el primero en comentar

  • Sé el primero en recomendar esto

Dollymount flood wall review feb 2016 rev2

  1. 1.     Dollymount Flood Wall  External Review    Draft Report    Prepared   By  Dr. Jimmy Murphy  MaREI Centre, UCC    February 2016 
  2. 2. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   2      Table of Contents Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 3  Expert Reviewer Profile........................................................................................................................... 4  Site visit. .................................................................................................................................................. 4  Public Input ............................................................................................................................................. 4  Design Assessment .................................................................................................................................. 4  Extreme Water Levels ......................................................................................................................... 4  Sea Level Rise (SLR) ............................................................................................................................. 6  Wave Conditions ................................................................................................................................. 7  Minimum Freeboard ......................................................................................................................... 12  Recommended Wall Level .................................................................................................................... 12  Alternative Wall Solutions .................................................................................................................... 12  Demountable barriers ....................................................................................................................... 13  Glass Walls ........................................................................................................................................ 13  Increase Road Levels ......................................................................................................................... 14  Water Level Control .......................................................................................................................... 14  Modify Design Criteria ...................................................................................................................... 14  Crest Re‐design ................................................................................................................................. 14  Conclusion and Recommendation ........................................................................................................ 15  Documents and correspondence reviewed .......................................................................................... 16  Appendix 1 – Review Brief .................................................................................................................... 18     
  3. 3. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   3      Introduction This review of the wall height of the Dollymount promenade was carried out to assess if the current  crest level of 4.25m ODM (Ordnance Datum Malin Head) is appropriate for this location.  A number  of documents relevant to the promenade design and the determination of extreme values for the  Dublin  Bay  area  were  assessed  in  this  review.    A  listing  of  all  documents,  communications,  presentations etc used in this review are listed at the end of this report.      The basis of design of the wall was to protect against a two hundred year event in relation to water  levels and winds in Dublin Bay and to provide a level of safety against anticipated sea level rise.  The  final height of the wall is made up of 4 components as shown in figure 1 [7].  The initial designed  level was 4.6m ODM however this was reduced to lessen the visual impact.  The resultant wall height  of 4.25m ODM is considered an interim solution which may, depending on the rate of sea level rise,  need  to  be  increased  to  the  original  designed  values  in  the  future.    In  relation  to  the  existing  defences the new wall height ranges from being equal in height to being at a maximum 0.85m higher  than existing defences.  The impact of the increased height is minimal to pedestrians and cyclists  using the promenade and slightly restricts views of the lagoon from the footpath on the St Annes  Park side.  It does however restrict views in places from standard cars travelling along the road.    The primary issue of public concern is in relation to the height of the wall, that it is not in line with  other flood defences in Dublin and it obscures views of Bull Island.   The analysis carried out in this  review only considers the appropriateness of the design decisions made in terms of the wall height  and examines other options to provide the same level of protection.  No comment is made about  any other flood scheme in the Dublin area as that is not part of the current remit.        Figure 1 Designed wall Configuration [7] 
  4. 4. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   4    Expert Reviewer Profile Dr Jimmy Murphy is a senior Research Engineer in the MaREI Centre in University College Cork and  has over 20 years experience in marine projects in relation to the design and evaluation of coastal  and  harbour  structures.    This  work  involves  the  use  of  such  tools  as  physical  model  testing,  numerical modelling and field measurements to optimise the layout and design of marine structures.    He lectures in the School of Engineering in UCC on the subjects of Environmental Hydrodynamics  and  Harbour  and  Coastal  Engineering.    In  addition  he  supervises  a  number  of  PhD  and  masters  students and has a number of publications in the areas of coastal engineering and ocean energy.    Site visit. A site visit took place on Friday 18th  December 2015 where in the presence of Mr. Gerard O’Connell  from Dublin City Council (DCC) the promenade scheme and the wall design were explained.  Where  access was available we examined the wall and drove along the section of road most affected by its  construction.  We also visited the Bull Island biosphere via both the causeway and wooden bridge  and generally discussed flood defence levels in the local area and the impacts of previous extreme  events.    This  visit  clarified  the  issues  in  relation  to  the  visual  impacts  and  the  flood  defence  requirement.     Public Input I have reviewed officially submitted documents from the public ([15] and [16]) as well as kept in  touch with media reports ([18], [19] and [20]) while working on this review.  This has highlighted to  me  the  importance  of  this  issue  to  the  local  community  and  the  connection  they  have  with  the  physical environment.  Thus I feel that I am aware of the significant public concerns in relation to the  flood wall although many issues raised are outside the remit of my review (as outlined in Appendix  1), which focuses on the engineering justification for the current wall height.  After submission of  this draft report it is planned that I meet with DCC and public groups and subsequently finalise the  document.     Design Assessment This section considers each of the elements that determine the wall height.  I should state to begin  with that even though all the relevant information was available, I did not find a clear consistent  design document and the information provided, as used to determine the wall height, sometimes  differed between documents, i.e. [4] and [7].    Extreme Water Levels The  extreme  water  levels  are  the  most  dominant  component  in  terms  of  determining  the  wall  height. In Figure 1 this has a value of 3.2m ODM (in this report I will only use Ordnance Datum Malin  as the reference for the vertical datum) which represents the 200 year return condition.  Extreme  water levels are made up of a combination of astronomical and meteorological (surge) components,  the former can be predicted well in advance whilst the latter is dependent on the weather.  If the  astronomical component is first considered it can be seen from Figure 2 (column labelled mODM)  that the design water level for the wall is 1.21m higher than the highest astronomical tide (HAT).  
  5. 5. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   5    This  indicates that there  is  a  high surge component to the water levels  in  Dublin Bay and this  is  borne out by the number of extreme water levels in recent years.  The 2002 event had a water level  of 2.97m ODM twhich was the highest ever recorded water level up to that point whilst the tide of  3rd January 2014 reached a recorded level of 3.014m ODM at Alexandra basin in the Docklands with  unconfirmed information of a level of , 3.047m ODM at Dollymount.  A study undertaken by Royal  Haskoning [9] after the extreme event of 2002 showed that the 200 year event had a value of 3.13m  ODM which differs slightly from the value indicated in Figure 1.  A re‐evaluation of extreme levels in  2015  [5]  using  the  most  up  to  date  data  showed  that  the  magnitudes  were  largely  unchanged.   However when taking account of sea level rise in the period between 2003‐2015 and more accurate  tide level data there is an adjustment of the 200 year water level to 3.25m ODM.  This is stated as  follows in [5];  The residual mean water level of the tidal analysis gives an indication of the changes in  Mean  Sea  Level  (MSL)  that  have  occurred  over  the  years.  Based  on  the  additional  tide  gauge  data,  an  increase  of  0.13m  was  observed  in  the  last  13  years  (Svasek  Hydraulics  2015)  Although the analysis has shown that to date in Dublin the extreme water levels are stable there is a  risk  that  they  could  change  due  to  climate  influences.    Changes  in  storm  duration,  intensity  and  frequency  as  well  as  sea  level  rise  can  contribute  to  surge  levels  increasing  and  this  has  been  highlighted by the IPCC.  The text below is taken from [14].   In summary, dynamical and statistical methods on regional scales show that it is very likely  that there will be an increase in the occurrence of future sea level extremes in some regions by  2100, with a likely increase in the early 21st century. The combined effects of MSL rise and  changes in storminess will affect future extremes. There is high confidence that extremes will  increase with MSL rise yet there is low confidence in region‐specific projections in storminess  and storm  Gregory [13] also concludes that   It is very likely that there will be a significant increase in the occurrence of future sea level  extremes.  It is not suggested that any change be made to the extreme values due to possible future changes  but in terms of the wall height the freeboard allowance can incorporate this risk.  The 200 year design criterion for coastal flood defences is standard for Ireland and I am satisfied that  the data available and methods of analysis used were satisfactory for determining the level to be  used for the flood defence wall.  The most relevant value to use in this case would be 3.25m ODM  and not the 3.13m ODM or the 3.2m ODM values that are indicated in some documents ([4] and [7]).      
  6. 6. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   6      Figure 2 Dublin (North Wall) Tidal Levels [4]  Sea Level Rise (SLR) There are no fixed rules in terms of the application of a sea level rise allowance in the design of  coastal structures in Ireland.  I have experience from various projects where values chosen range  from 0 – 1m with the most common value used being 0.5m.  The choice is determined by what the  client or the design engineer considers to be the most appropriate.  There is a lot of uncertainty in  terms of the long term rate of SLR but best estimates from the IPCC research indicate that it is very  likely  that  the  21st‐century  mean  rate  of  SLR  will  exceed  that  of  1971‐2010.    Figure  3  indicates  possible  SLR  based  on  different  climate  parameters.    Given  that  there  is  clear  evidence  that  sea  levels are rising and for Dublin Bay, taking land submergence into account, the rate is greater than  4mm/year it is important that an allowance be made in any flood defence design.    In 2011 the OPW issued guidelines whereby a sea level rise of 0.5 metres could be used when using  Mid‐Range  Future  Scenario  (MRFS)  and  a  sea  level  rise  of  1  meter  for  High  End  Future  Scenario  (HEFS)  [5].  In  relation  to  Dublin  Bay  the  Roughan  O  Donovan  report  [4]  base  the  sea  level  rise  allowance  on  the  findings  from  the  Intergovernmental  Panel  on  Climate  Change  (IPCC,  2007).    A  recommendation for sea level rise of 0.4m is used for the year 2100.  Therefore the combination of  sea level rise and extreme water levels taken from [4] gives a value of 3.53m ODM which is lower  than  the  value  of  3.7m  ODM  taken  from  Figure  1.    The  Royal  Haskoning  report  [5]  provide  a  combined value of 3.76m ODM.    My assessment for a design horizon up to 2100 and using a 200 year extreme level of 3.25m ODM  (which  includes  SLR  up  to  2015)  is  that  a  value  of  0.4m  for  SLR  would  be  appropriate.    This  corresponds to an average sea level rise of about 4.7mm/year which is higher than the current rate.   Combining the extreme water level with sea level rise gives a total water level of 3.66m ODM.  This  value is broadly in line with the value provided in Figure 1.      
  7. 7. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   7      Figure 3 Sea Level Rise Trends [13]  Wave Conditions The analysis of wave conditions for the determination of design conditions was not fully clear so I  carried  out  a  separate  analysis  which  will  be  presented  in  this  report.    The  Roughan  O  Donovan  report [4] indicate that given the restricted nature of the fetch (distance over which the wind blows)  and the shelter provided by local topography it is likely that the 1 year return significant wave height  (Hs) values along the Dollymount frontage to be of the order of 0.47m with a potential maximum  wave height of 0.8m .  My assessment would be that such wave magnitudes are very high in relation  to the length of the fetch and may not consider that direction of propagation as this has a significant  influence on how the waves interact with the flood defence.  For instance the highest waves are  likely to be generated along the longest fetch which is orientated in a circa SW‐NE direction.  Waves  propagating in this direction will be confined by the wall but will not break or reflect from it.  This is  different from waves generated from easterly winds which are directly incident on the wave wall but  are likely to be much reduced in height due to the shorter fetch.  The analysis to clarify the wave  conditions incident on the wall used two different sets of empirical formulae for determining the Hs  and Tp (peak wave period).  The first method is as outlined in the Coastal Engineering Manual whilst  the second formulation was developed by Donegan and Walsh.     Input information includes wind speed, fetch length and water depths and which this information  the  design  wave  conditions  on  the  wave  wall  can  be  is  determined.    In  this  analysis  three  wind  directions were considered as can be seen from figure 4‐6.  The fetch lengths used in each case are  shown in these figures and in the analysis the average water depth over the fetch for a 3.66m ODM  water level was chosen as 3.0m.  Also I used the same wind speeds for all directions as used by [4]  even though there are slight variations that I considered not to be significant. I should note that 
  8. 8. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   8    there is a high level of uncertainty regarding determining the wave conditions in such enclosed and  restricted short fetches and some wave measurement would be very useful.    If waves that propagate towards the wall are first considered (Table 1) then it can be seen that the 1  year significant wave height (corresponding to the 18.2m/s wind speed) is of the order of 0.3m with  an associated wave period of 1.7s.  These waves are relatively minor in terms of their size and do not  represent a major loading on the wall structure.  The manner in which these waves interact with the  wall is important as because they are low in height and short in length they will not break against the  wall but reflect from it.  Therefore overtopping from wave breaking should not generally occur for  this structure although it would be likely that the high wind speeds would lead to whitecapping of  the waves.  Previous physical model testing on vertical structures that I have undertaken indicated  whilst the waves are largely reflective occasional breaking can occur that can lead to overtopping.     When a non breaking wave interacts with a vertical wall a standing wave can be established in front  of the structure which means that wave oscillations at the wall increases and are doubled in many  cases (known as clapotis).  Therefore instead of the water level oscillating around the mean level by  0.15m (for a 0.3m wave) it now oscillates with an amplitude of 0.3m.  Therefore a minimum of 0.3m  is required to be added to the wall height to ensure that water does not consistently overtop the  structure.  This allowance is also sufficient to cater for waves propagating along the length of the  lagoon as their maximum height of 0.47m (Table 3) results in an amplitude of oscillation of 0.235m.   Table 3 also shows that the causeway experiences the largest waves generated in the lagoon.   Therefore the recommended allowance for wave action on the wall is 0.3m    
  9. 9. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   9      Figure 4 Fetch length 1 [11]    Table 1 Calculated Wave Conditions for fetch 1  CEM Donegan Wind SpeeDepth (m)Fetch (m) Hs (m) Tp (s) Hs (m) Tp (s) 18.2 3 833 0.29 2.06 0.30 1.71 23.4 3 833 0.39 2.25 0.38 1.89 27.3 3 833 0.47 2.37 0.45 2.01 29 3 833 0.51 2.42 0.48 2.06 30.7 3 833 0.54 2.46 0.50 2.11 32.9 3 833 0.59 2.52 0.54 2.16
  10. 10. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   10      Figure 5 Fetch length 2 [11]    Table 2 Calculated Wave Conditions for fetch 2    CEM Donegan Wind SpeeDepth (m)Fetch (m) Hs (m) Tp (s) Hs (m) Tp (s) 18.2 3 671 0.26 2.06 0.27 1.60 23.4 3 671 0.35 2.25 0.34 1.77 27.3 3 671 0.42 2.37 0.40 1.88 29 3 671 0.46 2.42 0.43 1.93 30.7 3 671 0.49 2.46 0.45 1.97 32.9 3 671 0.53 2.52 0.48 2.03
  11. 11. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   11      Figure 6 Fetch length 3 [11]      Table 3 Calculated Wave Conditions for fetch 3    CEM Donegan Wind SpeeDepth (m)Fetch (m) Hs (m) Tp (s) Hs (m) Tp (s) 18.2 3 2040 0.45 2.06 0.47 2.23 23.4 3 2040 0.61 2.25 0.60 2.47 27.3 3 2040 0.74 2.37 0.70 2.63 29 3 2040 0.79 2.42 0.74 2.69 30.7 3 2040 0.85 2.46 0.79 2.75 32.9 3 2040 0.93 2.52 0.84 2.83
  12. 12. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   12    Minimum Freeboard Freeboard is required to provide a level of safety in the design particularly when there is uncertainty  regarding  input  values  that  were  used.    The  application  of  safety  factors  is  standard  engineering  practice so it is justifiable to use them for the wall design.   In this case the main uncertainty relates  to the determination of the design wave conditions and their interaction with the wall.   Examples of  uncertainties are provided below;   Given that the wind speed used to generate the wave conditions is the average hourly value  and the short length of this fetch would indicate that the 10 minute wind speed would be  more appropriate to use.  Therefore wave conditions are expected to be slightly higher than  indicated.     The exact nature of wave interaction with the wall is dependent on a number of factors that  cannot  be  fully  quantified.    In  this  case  field  monitoring  should  be  carried  out  and  also  physical modelling testing in order to better understand what is happening.     Uncertainty regarding extreme water levels as previously outlined  I consider a value of 0.3m freeboard as used in the design to be appropriate.  Generally in exposed  coastal locations higher freeboards are required mainly to cater for wave action.  Given that wave  conditions  are  benign  in  the  lagoon  and  the  type  of  wave  interaction  with  the  wall  this  level  of  freeboard is acceptable.    Recommended Wall Level The overall assessment of the wall height is made up of the following components  Extreme water level (200 yr)    3.25m   Sea Level Rise      0.4m   Wave Action      0.3m   Freeboard      0.3m   Total Height Required    4.25m ODM  Therefore  I  consider  the  selected  wall  height  of  4.25m  ODM  to  be  appropriate  in  terms  of  the  criteria set out for the design. It is interesting that even though the components that makeup the  wall height in this review differ from the design the overall value remains the same.    Alternative Wall Solutions The  previous  analysis  indicates  that  the  currently  designed  wall  height  is  justified  based  on  the  information on various analyses of the extreme conditions and the design criteria that was used.   This section outlines possible alternative solutions that would not have the same visual impact but  would in general provide the same level of protection from flooding.  It would be the intention that  such solutions if implemented will be applied along a 450m section of the road where the maximum  increase in wall height is 0.69m.  The introduction of these options is not a recommendation for their  use as each would require full design and planning.     
  13. 13. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   13    Demountable barriers Demountable barriers are a well proven solution and have been successfully used in a number of  flood schemes in Ireland.  There are a number of different types of solutions and a design study  would be required to determine which would be most appropriate for this site and how it could be  incorporated into the existing structure.  These barriers would need new planning permission and  the  costs  would  be  relatively  high  as  they  would  need  to  include  modifying  the  existing  wall,  purchasing  the  barriers  and  providing  a  storage  location.    Also  their  erection  would  require  significant  resources  during  a  flood  event  from  DCC  as  this  scheme  would  double  Dublin’s  total  length of such barriers.    Glass Walls Constructing all or part of the wall using glass panels has been suggested as a potential option to  preserving the views from the road.  To date glass walls have been used primarily in riverine and  sheltered  estuarine  locations  and  there  are  examples  in  Germany,  UK  and  Ireland  with  the  Waterford City Flood Alleviation Scheme the most commonly referenced site in Ireland.  There is no  doubt  that  glass  panels  could  be  designed  to work  for  the Dollymount  site  even  though  there  is  limited knowledge as to how they would behaviour when subject to regular wave action.  Although  this should not really be an issue as, if only the top 0.5m of the wall was glass then wave action at  this level would be rare.  There are other factors that should be taken into consideration in relation  to glass walls and these include    Cost  –  The  overall  cost  of  glass  panel  system  can  wary  depending  on  the  particular  application but figures up to €5k per linear meter have been suggested.     Maintenance – They would require regular cleaning    Possible Vandalism in the form of breaking and graffiti    Environmental impacts – it is possible that reflections and glare from the glass may have a  negative impact on this sensitive costal ecosystem and this would need to be investigated.       Figure 7 Glass Floodwall in Waterford City [10] 
  14. 14. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   14    Increase Road Levels This relatively simple solution would involve raising the road level such that the views from the road  would be at least partially restored.  Given an average eye height for car drivers as being 1.1m then  the road level would need to be above 3.15m ODM to enable views beyond the wall.  DCC state that  this option has been already assessed at an area Committee briefing and it was estimated that it  would cost of the order of €0.5m which was considered to be impractical.    Water Level Control This  solution  would  involve  controlling  the  level  of  water  entering  the  Dollymount  lagoon  by  constructing a barrier type structure at the Dollymount bridge location.  This would be  activated  during extreme events and would prevent waters from reaching high levels in the lagoon and so  reduce the required height of the wall.  Such a scheme would be expensive, require planning and  potentially  be  disruptive  to  the  existing  natural  environment  so  is  unlikely  to  be  a  feasible  alternative.     Modify Design Criteria An important point relates to the use of the 200 year condition in the design process.   This is a very  extreme value and a level that has never been recorded in Dublin Bay in over 90 years of records.  I  queried DCC regarding the use of this return period in this case.  For instance the 100 year extreme  water level is 0.1m lower and if used would have a positive impact in terms of the visual aspects.   DCC responded by stating that their advice from the OPW is that coastal flood defence designs as  undertaken  by  them  should  be  to  the  200  year  return  period  and  this  is  in  line  with  all  recent  schemes  designed  in  Dublin.    Their  view  is  that  damages  from  tidal  flooding  are  generally  significantly worse than river flooding for a number of reasons including associated wave action, salt  water content, ground water contamination, overloading of combined sewer networks, etc.  A  200  year  design  event  could  occur  due  to  a  number  of  different  combination  of  events  –  the  design case chosen used the 200 year water level with the 1 year wave height as this was found to  give the most severe loading on the structure with respect to flood risk.  But other cases studied  included the 10 year water level with 10 year wave condition and the 50 year wave with 1 year  water level [4].  These obviously would have a lesser impact in terms of the height of the wall but as  is standard engineering design practice the most severe condition was chosen.  My view is that the  water level should be the dominant criteria as wave conditions are relatively benign at this site.  The  Roughan O Donovan report [4] does say that the design horizon of the wall is 2100 and from which  sea level rise adjustment values were determined.   Given that this is the case it should be assessed  whether a 100 year design condition could be used instead of the 200 year.    The other option for modifying the design criteria is in relation to the sea level rise allowance.  Given  that measured water levels as recent as 2014 were above 3.0m ODM there may be more scope in  reducing the 0.4m allowance then changing the 200yr extreme level design.  Therefore if the SLR  element of the wall height was reduced by between 0.1‐0.2m and DCC carried out frequent reviews  based on extreme water levels and sea level rise rates then this could provide a solution.    Crest Re‐design It was stated previously that waves will not consistently overtop the wall during a storm event but it  will occur occasionally.  The current crest design  is not optimum  for minimising overtopping  and 
  15. 15. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   15    could be modified.  Figure 8 below shows the type of crest configuration that is often used in coastal  structures to reduce overtopping volumes and it may be possible to shape the capping piece of the  Dollymount  wall  in  this  manner.    This  would  improve  the  performance  of  the  wall  against  wave  action and could delay the ultimate planned increase of the wall to 4.6m ODM.      Figure 8 Example of Crest Detail for vertical wall [12]  Conclusion and Recommendation The analysis that I have carried out show that the current wall height (4.25m ODM) is justified based  on the design criteria used even though the components that make up this height differ slightly from  indicated values.    This  still  leaves  the  issue  with  regards  to  the  loss  of  visual  amenity  and  in  this  review  I  have  suggested a number of solutions.  The majority of solutions considered have significant implications  in terms of costs, planning requirements and environmental effects and would be unlikely to resolve  the  immediate  issue.    Therefore  the  recommendation  that  I  would  make  is  that  DCC  review  the  design criteria and in particular the SLR allowance included in the design.  My suggestion is that a  value in the range of 0.2‐0.3m be used (instead of 0.4) which would mean that by current mid range  SLR scenarios the wall height should still be sufficient to provide flood protect for at least 50 years.   This proposed adjustment of the wall height should only be applied at locations where the visual  amenity is most affected as agreed between DCC and local groups.  If this solution is implemented  then DCC would need to frequently review both extreme water levels and sea level rise rates and  have a plan in place for increasing the wall height to ensure that there is a sufficient level of flood  protection.   
  16. 16. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   16    Documents and correspondence reviewed I have listed below all documentation that was made available to me by DCC plus additional items  that I used as part of the review.   [1] Dollymount Promenade and Flood Protection Project  ‐ Historic Evolution and Geomorphologic  Assessment (2009)  [2]  Dollymount  Promenade  and  Flood  Protection  Project;  Historic  Evolution  and  Geomorphologic  Assessment, Roughan O'Donovan / Dublin City Council, 21 September 2009, Final Report  [3]  Dollymount  Promenade  and  Flood  Protection  Project;  Hydrodynamic  Modelling  Report,  September 2009, Final Report, 9T3615  [4] Dollymount Promenade and Flood Protection Project ‐ Coastal and Flood Risk Engineering Design  Criteria Report, Roughan O'Donovan / Dublin City Council, September 2009, Final Report, 9T3615  [5] Clontarf ‐ Task1 ‐ Wave Transformation Report, Royal Haskoning, 27 August 2015, RDCR001D01,   [6]  Dollymount  Flood  Alleviation  Project,  Briefing  Notes,  Prepared  by  Gerard  O  Connell,  29th   Oct  2015  [7] S2S Cycleway & Footway Interim Works (Bull Road to Causeway Road), Presentation to Elected  Members, 11th November 2015  [8] Greater Dublin Strategic Drainage Study, Regional Drainage Policies – Volume 5 Climate Change,  March 2005  [9]  Dublin  Coastal  Flooding  Protection  Project,  Final  Report  Volume  1  ‐  Main  Report,  Royal  Haskoning, April 2005  [10]  Waterford  City  Flood  Alleviation  Scheme,  Gavin  O’Donovan,  BE  CEng  MIEI,  Associate,  RPS  Consulting Engineers Ltd, (Paper first presented to Engineers Ireland on 12th Feb 2014)  [11] Google Maps  [12] EurOtop; Wave Overtopping of Sea Defences and Related Structures: Assessment Manual, Jan  2007, SSN 0452‐7739, ISBN 978‐3‐8042‐1064‐6, http://www.overtopping‐manual.com/eurotop.pdf  [13] Projections of sea level rise, Presentation by Jonathan Gregory, Lead author, Chapter 13, Sea  level change IPCC, https://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/unfccc/cop19/3_gregory13sbsta.pdf  [14] IPCC Report (2013) Chapter 13 Sea Level Change,   https://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment.../WG1AR5_Chapter13_FINAL.pdf    [15] Morrissey Family Letter to Dublin City Council ‐ 29th October 2015  [16] Follow up Note to Dublin City Councillors re Sea Protection ‐ Height Survey (John Morrissey)  [17] Frequently Asked Questions_Version 2_30th October 2015 
  17. 17. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   17    [18]  http://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/residents‐say‐clontarf‐sea‐wall‐construction‐ must‐be‐stopped‐1.2409083  [19] http://www.clontarf.ie/news/sea‐wall‐update‐letter‐to‐dcc‐from‐local‐representative‐groups  [20]  http://www.herald.ie/news/deluge‐of‐complaints‐for‐councils‐berlin‐wall‐on‐the‐clontarf‐road‐ 34395037.html     
  18. 18. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   18    Appendix 1 – Review Brief Final Draft Re: Dollymount Flood Wall – External Expert Brief. Following unanimous approval of a motion by Dublin City Councillors at an emergency meeting of the Council on Wednesday 11th November last (copy attached) it has been decided to procure a external expert to independently assess the height of the partially constructed and proposed new sea wall along Clontarf Road and James Larkin Road between the Wooden Bridge and the Causeway to Bull Island, Clontarf, Dublin 3. Representations from members of the public who drive past this new wall contend that it obscures their views of Bull Island thus requesting this review. Attached are frequently asked questions and links to the City Councils web-site which outline the history of the project so far and some of the main issues queried by local and regional residents. The brief for this external expert includes the following: 1. Site visit. Meeting with Environmental Monitoring Group. 2. Review previous reports which include this section of flood defence and the latest relevant national/international best practice documents on climate change with a view to verifying and/or establishing relevant design criteria. This shall include but not be limited to:-  Greater Dublin Strategic Drainage Study (GDSDS) Climate Change Policy Document No.5 adopted by Dublin City Council.  Dublin Coastal Flood Protection Project.  SAFER Project.  Clontarf Promenade Wave Modelling Projects.  Dublin Bay tide gauge records with particular attention to Sea level rise noted between 2000-2014.  An Bord Pleanala Decisions & Inspector’s Reports for this stretch of wall.
  19. 19. Dollymount Flood Wall – External Review 2016   19     Part 8 approval by Dublin City Council for this cycleway, watermain and flood wall.  National/International best practice on guidelines and recommendations on current and future flood defence heights.  Eastern Region CFRAMS reports and draft CFRAM floodmaps.  Irish Coastal Flood Protection Strategy (ICFPP) – OPW.  Review of international best practice on design of coastal defences/flood defences and climate change.  Other reports/analysis which the expert deems necessary. 3. Analysis and recommendation on the four main constituents which make up the height of this flood wall.  Static tide design level (appropriate return period and associated level),  global warming element (temporal allowance and appropriate sea level rise allowance(s) for same)  associated wave defence component (based on wave climate in lagoon and overtopping of flood wall),  freeboard allowance (if any required). 4. Assessment of the suitability of a glass wall option for the highest portions of the proposed new wall. 5. Draft report in 3 weeks with final report in 4 weeks. The report will outline all reports and studies read by the expert, his/her conclusions from them and his/her analysis and recommendation in respect of the height of the coastal flood defence wall required for this section of Dublin City coastline, i.e. adequacy of the existing design or proposed new design level.  

×