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Bridge how to manage people in an organisation pgp

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Bridge how to manage people in an organisation pgp

  1. 1. How to Manage People in an Organisation Points to Ponder from “Awesomely Simple” by John Spence Redefined by Puttu Guru Prasad VIVA the School
  2. 2. How to Manage People in an Organisation Points to Ponder from Awesomely Simple by John Spence Redefined by Puttu Guru Prasad VIVA the School
  3. 3. Professor & Lawyer Puttu Guru Prasad B.Com., M.Com., M.Phil., M.B.A., PGDFTM., AP.SET., M.Phil., DRMS., L.L.B., ICFAI TMF., DIRM., L.L.M., Pre PhD (PhD)from JNTUK., “Diploma in Psychology from YALE University” MHRDI’s IIC Ambassador NSS Certified Program Officer, (A.U) Senior Faculty for Business Studies, Economics, Accounts Head, Board of Administration & Management Science, Bhagavad Gita & CLAT Program Coordinator, Commerce Department, VIVA-VVIT, Nambur, My Blog: puttuguru.blogspot.in
  4. 4. The 5 ‘C’s of an Effective Employee in an Organization
  5. 5. Collaboration Character
  6. 6. John Spence has spent decades helping business owners and managers cut through the clutter to determine the core ingredients for creating and sustaining a successful organization. In his book Awesomely Simple, Spence helps you take a hard look at your business and evaluate how it is doing in a number of critical areas that drive lasting success. Based on the author’s work with thousands of organizations (including GE, Microsoft, and Abbot Labs), every organization, no matter its size or sector, must excel in the following “Six Principles of Business Success”:
  7. 7. “Six Principles of Business Success”: 1.Vivid Vision 2.Best People 3.Robust Communication 4.Sense of Urgency 5.Disciplined Execution 6.Extreme Customer Focus These principles may appear simple and straightforward, but applying them is not easy. They require leaders who are passionate about their business and its success, persistent in their approach, willing to practice these disciplines, and have a perspective to see patterns and trends that others do not.
  8. 8. CUT through the CLUTTER
  9. 9. 1.VIVID VISION •Whether you lead two people or two thousand, it is critical that you have a clear, compelling, and extremely well-communicated vision of where the organization is headed and what it stands for. The mission (or purpose) is why the company exists, and its core values are the guidelines for behavior. The vision (BHAG*) provides a vivid description of where the company will be in the future. •The key to Mission, Values, and Vision (MVV) is not just creating them, but communicating and applying them throughout the organization. Engage as many senior leaders as possible in the initial stages of developing your MVV before rolling it out to the rest of the employee population for discussion and feedback. The concept of “Those who plan the battle, don’t battle the plan” is paramount here. Ideas for bringing your MVV to life in your organization include: •Making sure that the MVV is visible throughout the organization by putting plaques and posters in areas where both employees and customers can easily see them. Although this is an important aspect of ensuring visibility, the real value is achieved when the behaviors of everyone in the business are aligned.
  10. 10. Mission, Values, and Vision (MVV) Statement of Maruthi Suzuki
  11. 11. What Is a Big Hairy Audacious Goal (BHAG)?
  12. 12. Invulnerable to Fear or intimidation The trait of being willing to undertake things that involve risk or danger
  13. 13. Invulnerable to Fear or intimidation
  14. 14. Invulnerable=Immune to attack (Strong)
  15. 15. Invulnerable to intimidation (bullying)
  16. 16. What Is a Big Hairy Audacious Goal (BHAG)? A BHAG (Big Hairy Audacious Goal) is a compelling, long-term goal that is intriguing enough to inspire employees of an organization to take action. The term comes from the 1994 Harper Business book “Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies” by Jim Collins and Jerry Porras. BHAGs are meant to pull people out of a slump and energize them to implement a big picture-type plan that could take a decade to complete. BHAGs are broadly defined as falling under four main categories: role model, common enemy, targeting, or internal transformation. There are four broad categories of BHAG: •Role model •Common enemy •Targeting •Internal transformation 1. Role-model BHAGs are about emulating the success of a well-known company. This has been overdone a bit, with many companies seeking to be “the Uber" of their industry. 2. Common-enemy BHAGs focus on overtaking your competitors, aiming often at beating the top companies in the industry. 3. Targeting BHAGs refer to things such as becoming a billion-dollar company or ranking #1 in the industry. 4. Internal-transformation BHAGs are generally used by large, established companies to
  17. 17. He is Ambitious and Audacious. Means – Bold, Adventurous, Fearless, Gallant, Valiant, Knightly.
  18. 18. Examples of Big Hairy Audacious Goals •Unlike many mission statements, BHAGs do seem to catch on even with people outside the companies setting them. For example, •SpaceX’s goal to “enable human exploration and settlement of Mars” caught international attention. • Facebook has set a few BHAGs over time, including to “make the world more open and connected” and “give everyone the power to share anything with anyone.” • Google wants to “organize the world’s information and market it universally accessible and useful.” •Given what these companies have achieved already, it seems that setting BHAGs does work.
  19. 19. "Crush Adidas" •By 1971, the relationship between BRS and Onitsuka Tiger was nearing an end, and Knight prepared to launch its own line of footwear. It was the right time to rename the company; christened after the Greek goddess of victory, “Nike,” would become a household name. This new name was one way in which Knight got his staff enthused about the changes in the company. The other method was the vision the co-founder described to his people: his goal was to “crush Adidas.” •Although Adidas is still going strong in 2019, Knight’s goal was so inspiring that Nike is the world’s largest sports footwear brand in the world today. •Some examples of BHAGS mentioned by Collins and Porras are: •“Democratize the automobile.” (Ford, early 1900s). •“Become the company that most changes the worldwide image of Japanese products as being of poor quality.” (Sony, early 1950s). •“Yamaha Wo tsubusu! (We will crush, squash, slaughter Yamaha!)” (Honda, 1970s). •Microsoft’s vision of around 1980 that a computer would be on every desk and in every house; •SpaceX‘s plan to bring people to Mars; •Dutch telco KPN, that wants to become the most customer-friendly company in the Netherlands.
  20. 20. 2. Best People •The success of your business is directly tied to the quality of the people you have on your team. Many companies say, “Our people are our most important asset,” but very few have put in place a system to make talent management a key strategic advantage. With the right people in the right culture, success and profitability will result.
  21. 21. 3. Robust Communication •Strong interpersonal communication involves open dialog, good rapport, active listening, awareness of body language, and a willingness to engage in constructive conflict.
  22. 22. •Constructive conflict is difficult, and it requires courage and honesty. If you are not willing to hear things that may be counter to your philosophy and approach, and then make the necessary changes, you are not ready for constructive conflict.
  23. 23. 4. Sense of Urgency •In business today, speed rules. If you cannot move quickly, the competition will – not to mention that customers hate waiting and are becoming used to instant responses. Speed often requires making decisions in an environment of imperfect information. To make good decisions, data must flow easily within the organization. There can be no hoarding of knowledge; it must move without friction.
  24. 24. 5. Disciplined Execution •According to Harvard Business School professor Robert Kaplan, many companies have grand ambitions, but only about 10% of businesses can effectively execute on their strategic priorities in a disciplined and thorough manner. Urgency and discipline can exist together and must be balanced. •Disciplined execution requires: •Systems and processes that align with strategic goals. •Individual objectives that tie strongly to corporate objectives. •Mechanisms for continuous improvement or innovation of processes. •Resources, tools, and training in order for people to perform well in their roles.
  25. 25. 6. Extreme Customer Focus •At the end of the day, the only critic whose opinion counts is the customer, and the company that owns the “voice of the customer” owns the marketplace and will outpace the competition. Know the “moments of truth” for your clients – what are the key points where the customer interfaces with your company? Determine how to make each of these moments a highly satisfying interaction, and recognize that frontline employees are typically the most important element of these contacts. Survey your customers on an ongoing basis to ensure that you are meeting or exceeding their expectations. At a minimum, show up on time, keep your promises, be extremely polite, and give a little more than is expected.
  26. 26. 6. Extreme Customer Focus
  27. 27. 6. Extreme Customer Focus
  28. 28. “Caveat emptor” is Latin for "Let the Buyer Beware“ , and “Caveat Venditor” is Latin for “ Let the Seller Beware”

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