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Group 5 ppt

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Multicultural Education of Group 5 in Special Topics

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Group 5 ppt

  1. 1. CULTURAL PLURALISM
  2. 2. “All people are unique that’s why we are all the same.”
  3. 3. CULTURE refers to the "traditions, rituals, beliefs, and values that are shared amongst a group of people." Each person is a part of at least one culture.
  4. 4. CULTURAL PLURALISM is a situation where there are different ethnic or social groups that exist in the society and tried to develop their own culture. (Merriam-webster dictionary, n.d.)
  5. 5. Multiculturalism refers to sharing of many cultures.
  6. 6. Embedded within the concept of multicultural education is a belief that all students, regardless of their race, ethnicity, culture, and other characteristics such as social class or disability, should experience equal educational opportunities. Although no single recipe can accommodate all the facets of multicultural education, there are certain common ingredients.
  7. 7. GOALS OF A DIVERSE PROGRAM
  8. 8. THE FIRST GOAL OF A DIVERSE PROGRAM IS TO ASSIST CHILDREN WITH RECOGNIZING DIFFERENCES, AS WELL AS SIMILARITIES, AMONG ALL PEOPLE.
  9. 9. THE SECOND GOAL IS TO ENCOURAGE COOPERATIVE SOCIAL SKILLS.
  10. 10. Educational equity School reform; changes in culture of school and classroom, curriculum, teacher expectations, assessment, texts and materials, hidden curriculum.
  11. 11. Human relations Building individual and group self-esteem; empowerment of students and parents.
  12. 12. Social reconstruction Confronting and changing beliefs and attitudes.
  13. 13. Cultural pluralism Respect for diversity of all types in school and society.
  14. 14. Cross-cultural competence Knowledge of the shared culture; knowledge of other cultures.
  15. 15. INGREDIENTS FOR A SUCCESSFUL DIVERSE PROGRAM
  16. 16. THE FIRST INGREDIENT FOR A SUCCESSFUL DIVERSE PROGRAM IS THE CLASSROOM TEACHER'S KNOWLEDGE OF DIVERSE CULTURES.
  17. 17. THE SECOND INGREDIENT IS THE TEACHER MUST HAVE TO SUCCESSFULLY IMPLEMENT A CULTURALLY DIVERSE CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT THAT HAS AN ATTITUDE OF ACCEPTANCE AND RESPECT FOR OTHER CULTURES.
  18. 18. Helping children to compare, contrast, and learn about other cultures without making judgments about them requires this attitude of acceptance and respect.
  19. 19. The third critical ingredient for a teacher's success in implementing a culturally diverse classroom is the ability to add a multicultural perspective into curriculum planning and classroom management skills.
  20. 20. Remember that providing the children with a multicultural program helps boost self-esteem and teaches them about acceptance and diversity. A multicultural program will help children understand and work well with others as they grow and mature.
  21. 21. CURRICULUM FOR DIVERSE CLASSROOM
  22. 22. The curriculum plays a paramount role in influencing the attitudes of the students. As educators, we must make certain that the curriculum respects the dignity of all people.
  23. 23. A culturally pluralistic curriculum must be consistent with the goals of our culturally diverse society. Such curriculum should be characterized by mutual understanding and respect, equal worthiness of all cultural groups, and recognition of important contributions to society which each of these groups has made.
  24. 24. Promoting diversity in the classroom is vital to making students feel included in the group instead of alienated. It also helps students learn about and respect their peers' cultures and backgrounds. As an educator, you can foster a positive classroom environment built on diversity.
  25. 25. WAYS TO PROMOTE DIVERSITY IN CLASSROOM
  26. 26. Sharing of Differences Encouraging members of the class to share something special about themselves or their culture can promote diversity.
  27. 27. Incorporating Activities You can also incorporate different age-appropriate activities such as a study of different types of food or music from different cultures or an investigation of the different types of hair each student has.
  28. 28. Creating a Diverse Environment As an educator, you can promote diversity through the decorations you choose for the classroom.
  29. 29. TIPS TO CONSIDER IN DEVELOPING A CLASSROOM THAT RECOGNIZES CULTURAL DIFFERENCES
  30. 30. Get to know your students. Be patient and understanding. Be aware of phrasing questions that can put these students on the spot. Consider inviting significant family or community persons to work with underachieving students. Familiarize yourself with studies that offer the ethnic students’ personal views of the academic environment. Be accessible.
  31. 31. THANK YOU FOR LISTENING  ANJANETH D. BALINGIT
  32. 32. Cultural Pluralism And Multiculturalism (Definitions, concepts and origins.)
  33. 33. I. What is Culture? Culture is “all those things that people have learned to do, believe, value, enjoy in their history, the ideals, beliefs, skills, tools, customs and institutions into which each member of society is born.” (Rotman, 2011)
  34. 34. TOPICAL CULTURE HISTORICAL BEHAVIORAL NORMATIVE STRUCTURAL MENTAL Symbolic
  35. 35. Assimilation Acculturation
  36. 36. AMERICANIZATION Americanization constituted a Nativist movement dedicated to erasing the original cultures, and especially the languages, of the twenty-seven million New Immigrants (that is, the Italians and Eastern Europeans) who entered the United States from 1880 to 1920. Theodore Roosevelt declared, “we have room for but one language here…. We intend to see that the crucible turns our people out as Americans, and not as dwellers in a polyglot boardinghouse.”
  37. 37. MELTING POT CONCEPT
  38. 38. MELTING POT CONCEPT
  39. 39. What is Cultural Pluralism?
  40. 40. Cultural Pluralism is a term used when smaller groups within a larger society are accepted by the wider culture provided they are consistent with the laws and values of the wider society. Often the acceptance of a culture may require that the new or minority culture remove some aspects of their culture which is incompatible with the laws or values of the dominant culture.
  41. 41. The idea of cultural pluralism has its roots in the transcendentalism supported by the transcendentalist movement. Transcendentalism is an American literary, political, and philosophical movement of the early nineteenth century. The transcendentalists operated with the sense that a new era was at hand. They were critics of their contemporary society for its unthinking conformity.
  42. 42. Cultural Pluralism was developed and improved by cultural pluralists namely, William James,Horace Kallen, Randolph Bourne, Louis Adamic, and Leonardo Coviello. William James  Horace Kallen He advocated that the United States become a “democracy of nationalities, cooperating voluntarily and autonomously in the enterprise of self-realization [utilizing] a common language… English.” A young German-born Jewish Devotion to Zionism
  43. 43. Robert Bourne Like Kallen, Bourne asserted that the foreign cultures could remain distinct but cooperative to the American nation, and should not be melted down or run together into some homogeneous Americanism. Why, he asked, should anyone propose that the immigrant cultures be replaced by “tasteless, colorless conformity?” England
  44. 44. Louis Adamic The thrust of Adamic’s approach to cultural pluralism is captured by his insistence that “in the past there has been entirely too much giving up, too much melting away and shattering of the various cultural values of the new groups. Americanized foreigner became a cultural zero paying lip service to the U.S., which satisfied the Americanizers.” inferiority Against discrimination
  45. 45. Leonardo Coviello “a true assimilation means absorption of the foreign groups without destruction of their fundamental characteristics and without the obliteration of an understandable pride in the fine things that come to them from the past history of their races and nations….” Name changing
  46. 46. What is Multiculturalism?
  47. 47. Multiculturalism is a social and political movement and position that holds differences between individuals and groups to be a potential source of strength and renewal rather than of strife. It values the diverse perspectives people develop and maintain through varieties of experiences and background stemming from racial, ethnic, gender, sexual orientation and class differences in society.
  48. 48. The doctrine underlying this position is cultural relativism the denial that any culture can be said to be better or worse than any other. Educators need a definition of multiculturalism that offers the possibility for schools to become places where students and teachers can become boarder crossers engaged in critical and ethical reflection about what it means to bring a wider variety of cultures into dealing with each other.
  49. 49. MULTICULTURALISTS Canadian Mosaic was a book by John Murray Gibbon, published in 1938. Gibbon's book, the full title of which was Canadian Mosaic: The Making of a Northern Nation, heralded a new way of thinking about immigrants that was to shape Canadian immigration policy in the latter part of the Twentieth century. The idea of a mosaic of cultures forming a nation was adopted by Canadian sociologist John Porter in his study of social class, entitled: Vertical Mosaic: An Analysis of Social Class and Power in Canada. The mosaic theme became a part of Canadian multiculturalism policy in the 1970s, which
  50. 50. PLURALISM VS. MULTICULTURALISM CULTURAL PLURALISM MULTICULTURALISM DOMINANCE -with dominant culture -without dominant culture CONCEPT TRANS-NATIONALISM SALAD BOWL PUBLIC SPHERE -Individuals are treated in a common public sphere. -is not culturally neutral. -is an arena for cultural negotiation. -No group should dominate in a way that excludes other cultural forms.
  51. 51. CULTURAL PLURALISM MULTICULTURALISM CULTURAL DIVERSITY Different cultures are allowed in a separate cultural sphere, but society has no obligation to acknowledge or support alternative cultural forms. Different cultures are encouraged. Individuals are considered part of collectivities that provide meaning to their lives. -seeks ways to support these collectivities. EDUCATIONAL GOALS 1) Mitigate social inequality by ensuring that merit is rewarded. 1) Cultural pride is encouraged.... -to overcome the disjuncture between a child’s culture and school culture that excludes a child from participating in the larger society.
  52. 52. CULTURAL PLURALISM MULTICULTURALISM EDUCATIONAL GOALS 2) Individuals are given alternatives. 3) Children have the right to develop their talents, interests and schools should challenge students by providing different experiences. -To correct hegemony of culture. 2) Cultural respect should be fostered. 3) Different cultural information and historical experiences are provided to the children.
  53. 53. Cultural Pluralism Multiculturalism ADVANTAGES 1) It leads the minority culture into adding a significant aspect of their culture to the dominant culture. 2) There is national unity. 3) There is more stable national identity 1) It leads to cultural exchanges. 2) Adds a variety in the life of all citizens. 3) It bridges the chasm of ignorance and arrogance.
  54. 54. Cultural Pluralism Multiculturalism DISADVANTAGES 1) The dominant culture is more prominent than the other cultures. 2) It usually leads to dissolution of other cultures. 3) The only aspect accepted in the minority culture is the culture that is compatible to the dominant culture. 1) It brings anxiety to stability of national identity. 2) It creates national disunity. 3) It leads to questionable loyalties.
  55. 55. END OF THE FIRST PART
  56. 56. Cultural Relativism Cultural Relativism is a philosophy that believes that when it comes to matters of right and wrong and other values of a moral nature that there are no absolutes or any fixed truths, but rather that all is relative. Cultural Relativist view themselves as tolerant; they see other cultures not as wrong but as different.
  57. 57. SALAD BOWL CONCEPT
  58. 58. SALAD BOWL CONCEPT
  59. 59. Multiculturalism/Cultural Pluralism in school setting
  60. 60. What is Multicultural Education? BANKS (1995) – define multicultural education as a field of study and an emerging discipline whose major aim is to create equal educational opportunities from diverse racial, ethnic, social class, and culture.
  61. 61. JAMES BANKS (2001) – the primary goal of multicultural education is to transform the school so that male and female students, exceptional students, and students from diverse cultural, social-class, racial and ethnic groups experience an equal opportunity to learn.
  62. 62. 4 APPROACHES IN ACCOMPLISHING MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION (James Banks) 1.CONTRIBUTIONS APPROACH – The ethnic heroes and holidays are included in the curriculum.
  63. 63. Philippine Constitution Article XIV-Education, Science Technology, Arts, Culture and Sports Education Section 3. (1) All educational institutions shall include the study of the Constitution as part of the curricula. (2) They shall inculcate patriotism and nationalism, foster love of humanity, respect for human rights, appreciation of the role of national heroes in the historical development of the country, teach the rights and duties of citizenship, strengthen ethical and spiritual values, develop moral character and personal discipline, encourage critical and creative thinking, broaden scientific and technological knowledge, and promote vocational efficiency
  64. 64. 2.ADDITIVE APPROACH In this approach content, concepts, themes, and perspectives are added to the curriculum without changing its basic structure.
  65. 65. 3.TRANSFORMATION APPROACH Courses and curricula are changed so students' thinking is stretched to view contributions, events, issues, and course concepts from the perspective of members of targeted groups.
  66. 66. Multicultural teaching is excellence in teaching. It is not so much a dialogue of whether we can get there or not, but rather a willingness to learn more about ourselves as instructors, our students, what we teach, and how we teach it so that we can provide the highest form of education possible for all students.
  67. 67. DIMENSIONS OF MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION There are 5 dimensions of multicultural education according to Banks (1997).  CONTENT INTEGRATION – it deals with the extent to which teachers use examples and content from a variety of cultures and groups to illustrate key concepts, generalizations, and issues within their subject area or disciplines.  KNOWLEDGE CONSTRUCTION PROCESS – it describes how teachers help students to understand, investigate, and determine how the biases, frames of reference, and perspectives within a discipline influence the ways in which knowledge is constructed within it. Students also learn how to build knowledge themselves in this dimension.
  68. 68.  PERJUDICE REDUCTION – it describes lessons and activities used by teachers to help students to develop positive attitudes toward different racial, ethnic, and cultural groups.  EQUITY PEDAGOGY – it exists when teachers modify their teaching in ways that will facilitate the academic achievement of students from diverse racial, cultural, and social class groups.  EMPOWERING SCHOOL CULTURE AND SOCIAL STRUCTURE – this dimension is created when the culture and organization of the school are transformed in ways that enable students from diverse racial, ethnic, and gender groups to experience equality and equal status.
  69. 69. THE GROWTH OF STUDENT SUBCULTURES Sociologists define subculture as cultural patterns that set apart some segment of a society’s population. Subcultures can be based on age, ethnicity, residence, sexual preference, occupation, and many factors.  Sometimes , the special cultural traits of a particular group are too numerous and too interwoven to be called specialties.
  70. 70. FUNCTIONS OF SUBCULTURES Subcultures perform specific functions such as: PERMITTING SPECIALIZED ACTIVITY - because subcultures (particularly occupational subcultures) carry the knowledge necessary to perform specialized tasks, they are essential to the division of labor which is essential in any society which is becoming larger and more complex. IDENTITY IN MASS SOCIETY – subcultures also provide a source of identity in mass society, thus preventing feelings of isolation and anomie. CULTURAL ADAPTATION AND CHANGE – another important function of subcultures is to serve as a source of adaptation to society. Often a subculture is the mechanism through which cultural diffusion occurs.

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