Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Se está descargando tu SlideShare. ×

Visuals -flipping--draft-one

Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Próximo SlideShare
Flipping presentation   final
Flipping presentation final
Cargando en…3
×

Eche un vistazo a continuación

1 de 103 Anuncio
Anuncio

Más Contenido Relacionado

Presentaciones para usted (20)

A los espectadores también les gustó (20)

Anuncio

Similares a Visuals -flipping--draft-one (20)

Más de Saul Carliner (13)

Anuncio

Más reciente (20)

Visuals -flipping--draft-one

  1. 1. Flipping Your Course Mastering the Strategy Saul Carliner, PhD, CTDP Associate Professor and Provost’s Fellow for Digital Learning Concordia University saulcarliner@hotmail.com saulcarliner.com
  2. 2. What is your role in Learning? a. Administrator b. Instructor / faculty member / teacher c. Instructional designer d. Manager e. Other
  3. 3. What is your prior experience developing an asynchronous e- learning program? a. Never developed for this medium b. I have developed 1 course (or are working on it) c. I have developed 2 to 5 courses d. I have developed 6 or more courses
  4. 4. What is your prior experience developing a synchronous e- learning program? a. Never developed for this medium b. I have developed 1 course (or are working on it) c. I have developed 2 to 5 courses d. I have developed 6 or more courses
  5. 5. What is your prior experience developing face-to-face programs? a. Never developed for this medium b. I have developed 1 course (or are working on it) c. I have developed 2 to 5 courses d. I have developed 6 or more courses
  6. 6. What is your prior experience developing e-learning? a. Never developed for this medium b. I have developed 1 course (or are working on it) c. I have developed 2 to 5 courses d. I have developed 6 or more courses
  7. 7. Why are you considering flipping a course?
  8. 8. What do you hope to learn in this workshop?
  9. 9. Agenda 1. Review the class prework: about the flipped learning strategy 2. Participate in a design-along of the lesson plan (design strategy) for a 1- to 3-hour flipped session
  10. 10. Objectives Main objective: Design (not develop) a 1-to 3-hour flipped class session. Supporting objectives:  Define the term, flipped classroom.  Describe the key components of the flipped teaching methodology.  Describe the advantages and disadvantages of flipping a course.  Describe applications of the flipped classroom in each educational context.  Prepare the key components of a flipped session.  Effectively communicate the structure of a flipped class to learners.
  11. 11. What is a flipped class?
  12. 12.  Start with experiential engagement (maybe not in training)  Concept exploration (presenting the content— lecture, videos, web content)  Meaning making – before coming to class, engage with other students around the material—quiz to test but also discussion questions
  13. 13. Flipped or blended? Introductory training for managers. In part 1, participants learn about the overarching management philosophy of the organization, policies and procedures, and writing performance plans, informal reviews, appraisals, and career development plans. In part 2, students learn and practice how to handle specific management situations, such as hiring interviews, reprimanding employees, and firing employees.
  14. 14. Flipped or blended? Conducting a needs assessment. In part , students learn the purpose of a needs assessment and the eight areas of questioning. In part 2, students prepare a draft needs assessment in class.
  15. 15. Flipped or blended? Preparing a business case. In part 1, students learn what a business case is, the key components of a business case, the types of information needed for each component, and see samples of a business case. In part 2, students create a business case.
  16. 16. What is blended learning? Share your thoughts.
  17. 17. What is blended learning?  Blended learning is learning in which different parts of a curriculum are made available in different formats (self-study or live) and media (online, print, or face-to-face).  With self-study materials, often “test” for successful learning before permitting the learner to move to the next part.
  18. 18. Blended learning is a curriculum strategy. What is a curriculum strategy? Share your thoughts.
  19. 19. A curriculum strategy links disparate courses and individual learning activities together to prepare a learner for a job or to complete a program of study.
  20. 20. What is a flipped class? Share your thoughts.
  21. 21. What is a flipped class? According to the Flipped Learning Network (FLN) (2014,p.1).  “Pedagogical approach in which direct instruction moves from the group learning space to the individual learning space”  “Resulting group space is transformed into a dynamic, interactive learning environment where the educator guides students as they apply concepts and engage creatively in the subject matter.  The group learning space is dynamic and interactive; this is not a place for a traditional discussion or a place where students are getting support on completing a worksheet. Rather the classroom is a space where learners are exploring, applying, creating and problem- solving.  Flipped learning may manifest as a type of blended learning, there are significant differences.
  22. 22. What is a flipped class? The practical definition.  It’s a strategy for a single class session in which all of the preparation about the conceptual material—including reading, lecturing and some initial practice and reflection—occurs before class, so class time can be used demonstrating and practicing the skill.  Class session usually begins with a verification that students properly learned the background material.  In an multi-week class, do not need to flip every lesson.
  23. 23. The flipped class is a teaching (instructional) strategy. What is a teaching (instructional) strategy?
  24. 24. A teaching or instructional strategy specifies how the teacher plans to present and reinforce the skills to learners.
  25. 25. So what does a flipped class look like?
  26. 26. How have educators used the flipped strategy? To teach business skills that follow a particular protocol To teach technical writing Work best with cognitive tasks and software-based tasks To teach finance To teach instructional design
  27. 27. What are the benefits of the flipped strategy? Share your thoughts.
  28. 28. What are the benefits of the flipped strategy? Practice in class Support problem solving and effective communication With proper design, can reduce cognitive load Can also adjust pace of classroom so those who master early go on to enrichment Support diverse learners with diverse materials (and ability to re-view lectures) Reduced travel costs and increased practice time
  29. 29. What are some of the challenges of the flipped strategy? Share your thoughts.
  30. 30. What are some of the challenges of the flipped strategy? Not right for every course—nor every student Unprepared students Flipping done badly Converting and recording lectures takes time People invest more energy in recording lectures than the effort is worth
  31. 31. What are the key components of the flipped strategy? Hint: It’s not just read first, watch the lecture, and then practice in class. Share your thoughts.
  32. 32. What are the key components of the flipped strategy? 1. Choose material that lends itself to flipping 2. Prepare pre-class materials. 3. Prepare in-class materials. 4. Provide incentives to complete the entire process.
  33. 33. Component 1: Choose material that lends itself to flipping. What type of material lends itself to this strategy?
  34. 34. Flipping works best with cognitive tasks and software-based tasks
  35. 35. Component 2. Prepare pre-class materials What is the purpose of pre-class materials?
  36. 36. Pre-class materials prepare learners to perform the skill by providing an overview of the skill as well as explanations of key concepts and terms. They might also include a demonstration of the skills.
  37. 37. Teach material in manageable chunks.  No longer married to “all of the reading then all of the lecture”  Can teach material one component skill at a time
  38. 38. Specifically address these issues
  39. 39. Specifically address these issues Generate interest In the entire topic of the lesson Use something engaging:  Scenario  Guiding question (responses on discussion board)
  40. 40. Specifically address these issues Generate interest In the entire topic of the lesson Use something engaging:  Scenario  Guiding question (responses on discussion board) Read Texts, articles, websites,
  41. 41. Specifically address these issues Generate interest In the entire topic of the lesson Use something engaging:  Scenario  Guiding question (responses on discussion board) Read Texts, articles, websites, Lecture Brief videos (original or from the Web), 5-7 minutes, end with a “cliffhanger” What would you do for a cliffhanger
  42. 42. Specifically address these issues Generate interest In the entire topic of the lesson Use something engaging:  Scenario  Guiding question (responses on discussion board) Read Texts, articles, websites, Lecture Brief videos (original or from the Web), 5-7 minutes, end with a “cliffhanger” What would you do for a cliffhanger Reflect and practice  Practice problems and share answers with classmates; get learners to also reflect on differences in classmate’s responses  Or reflect on how they might apply the lessons in an online discussion
  43. 43. Specifically address these issues Generate interest In the entire topic of the lesson Use something engaging:  Scenario  Guiding question (responses on discussion board) Read Texts, articles, websites, Lecture Brief videos (original or from the Web), 5-7 minutes, end with a “cliffhanger” What would you do for a cliffhanger Reflect and practice  Practice problems and share answers with classmates; get learners to also reflect on differences in classmate’s responses  Or reflect on how they might apply the lessons in an online discussion Prepare a singular guide through the disparate pieces Guidesheet  Instructions for going through the materials  Guiding questions to help learners focus their reading  Instructions to prepare for class
  44. 44. How do you plan to ensure that the pre-class work is completed?
  45. 45. How do you plan to ensure that the pre-class work is completed?  Inspect it  Test it  Require it
  46. 46. In the flipped strategy, what is the purpose of the classroom session? Share your thoughts
  47. 47. In the flipped strategy, the class session (a) verifies mastery of the pre-class material and (b) practices the broader skill covered by the lesson.
  48. 48. Check-in How well are you following this discussion? 1 2 3 4 5 I’m lost I think I’m getting it but won’t know until we start designing I’ve got this down pat
  49. 49. Component 3: Classroom Session
  50. 50. Component 3: Classroom Session Verify understanding How can you make the verification engaging?
  51. 51. Component 3: Classroom Session Verify understanding How can you make the verification engaging? Practice the skill Choose activities that are appropriate to the material:  Scenarios  Hands-on labs
  52. 52. Component 3: Classroom Session Verify understanding How can you make the verification engaging? Practice the skill Choose activities that are appropriate to the material: Scenarios Hands-on labs Provide exercises for both near and far transfer What are near and far transfer?
  53. 53. Component 3: Classroom Session Verify understanding How can you make the verification engaging? Practice the skill Choose activities that are appropriate to the material: Scenarios Hands-on labs Provide exercises for both near and far transfer What are near and far transfer?  Near transfer Apply material in situations nearly identical to the ones covered in class.  Far transfer Apply material in situations that significantly differ from the ones covered in class.
  54. 54. Component 3: Classroom Session Verify understanding How can you make the verification engaging? Practice the skill Choose activities that are appropriate to the material: Scenarios Hands-on labs Provide exercises for both near and far transfer What are near and far transfer?  Near transfer Apply material in situations nearly identical to the ones covered in class.  Far transfer Apply material in situations that significantly differ from the ones covered in class. Wrap-up Summarize and reflect on the learning and its applications Link to additional class sessions, especially the next one
  55. 55. Component 4: Providing incentives to complete the pre-work
  56. 56. Design – Along 1. Mini needs assessment (series of questions) 2. Design (series of questions) 3. Document the design as a formal lesson plan
  57. 57. 1. Mini Needs Assessment
  58. 58. a. Pick a class session you want to flip
  59. 59. Picking the class: What do you want to teach learners?
  60. 60. Picking the class: Make sure it is a subject that ends itself to advance reading or viewing, some preparation, and in-class problem solving?
  61. 61. Picking the class: How do you hope to benefit learners by flipping the class?
  62. 62. Picking the class: At the end of the pre- and in-class pair, what should students be able to do
  63. 63. b. What do you want to do in the classroom session? That is, what skills do you want to practice, types of problems do you want to work on?
  64. 64. c. To be prepared to come to class to work the problems or practice, what do learners need to be able to do?
  65. 65. Pre-class: What concepts must learners master?
  66. 66. Pre-class: With which policies must learners be familiar (if any)?
  67. 67. Pre-class: What terms must learners learn?
  68. 68. Pre-class: Which processes or protocols must learners be able to explain?
  69. 69. d. Who are the learners?  What factors in their home and work lives would affect their ability to complete pre-class work on time?  What factors in their home and work lives would encourage learners to complete the pre- class work on time?
  70. 70. e. What are the objectives:  Of the entire lesson  Of the pre-work only?  Of the classroom session only?
  71. 71. f. Write assessment questions for each (ideally open ones rather than objective ones).
  72. 72. Show your work!
  73. 73. Check-in How well are you following this discussion? 1 2 3 4 5 I’m lost I think I’m getting it but won’t know until we start designing I’ve got this down pat
  74. 74. 2. Design Using the knowledge gained through the mini needs assessment, prepare a lesson plan (design) for your flipped lesson.
  75. 75. a. What is the general instructional strategy holding the entire lesson together?
  76. 76. Mastery  Engage interest  Provide an overview  Present material  Demonstrate skill  Practice skill  Summarize  Test
  77. 77. Experiential  Experience  Read to identify core material  Review findings to verify understanding  Practice skills with a second experience
  78. 78. Classical  Read  Lecture  Practice
  79. 79. Pre-work: self-study course What are the expectations of a self-study course on the part of learners?
  80. 80. What are the expectations of a self- study course on the part of learners?  Explanation of purpose and benefits of the lesson  Clear unambiguous path through the materials  Clear materials that can be comprehended on the first try and without assistance  Activities that students feel prepared to complete  Responses to the activities (or knowledge of when they will receive responses)
  81. 81. What are the conventions of a self-study course? Share your thoughts.
  82. 82. What are the conventions of a self-study course?  Guide through the materials.  Introduction.  Clearly labelled activities.  Clear feedback on interactive activities.  Clear instructions on what to do next.  Indication of progress through the materials.  Notification of time needed (workplace only)
  83. 83. Can you “chunk” the pre-work into component skills for easier comprehension?
  84. 84. How will you introduce the lesson?
  85. 85. For each component skill, which resources do you plan to use to develop and reinforce the skills through self- study? Can you leverage existing materials? Do you need to develop new ones?
  86. 86. Do you also plan to ask learners to reflect on or practice a component skill? Combined skills? How do you plan to do so?
  87. 87. Can you use existing materials as is or do you need to adjust them?
  88. 88. Which ones are new? What medium will you use for them? For videos, what’s the “cliffhanger” at the end?
  89. 89. How will you guide through the pre- class work?
  90. 90. What instructions will you provide students to prepare for class?
  91. 91. Plan for the class session How will you reinforce the pre-class material?
  92. 92. In addition to reinforcing material, do you need to demonstrate something? What? Why?
  93. 93. Which are the must-cover problems in class?
  94. 94. Prepare feedback  Correct answer  Anticipated errors and feedback for them
  95. 95. How do you plan to summarize the lesson?
  96. 96. How will you assess knowledge?
  97. 97. How will you link this session to the next class session?
  98. 98. Show Your Work
  99. 99. Check-in How well are you following this discussion? 1 2 3 4 5 I’m lost I think I’m getting it but won’t know until we start designing I’ve got this down pat
  100. 100. 3. Prepare a formal lesson plan Objectives 1 2 3 . . . Pre-work 1 2 3 . . . Materials needed: Required preparation for class 1 2 3 . . . Class work 1 2 3 . . . Link to next lesson 1 2 3 . . .
  101. 101. Show Your Work
  102. 102. Questions?
  103. 103. Take-Aways What insights about designing a flipped classs will you take away from this workshop to your work?

×