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Getting the right angles for outreach: Jack Bamfield - SearchNorwich 5

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In this talk, Jack compares and contrasts his experiences in traditional PR to digital PR for SEO, where coverage is secured for links. He goes on to give great examples of successful campaigns and even detail on the outreach emails he was composing.

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Getting the right angles for outreach: Jack Bamfield - SearchNorwich 5

  1. 1. First things first…
  2. 2. First things first…
  3. 3. What do we do?
  4. 4. We produce creative campaigns like this…
  5. 5. This campaign for AdView reveals the first jobs of some of today’s most successful people
  6. 6. Inside the campaign - a first a job
  7. 7. Why?
  8. 8. In Outreach, our job is to get links and coverage...
  9. 9. …from top-tier news sites around the world
  10. 10. These links improve our client’s organic rankings on search engines
  11. 11. How do we get links in Outreach?
  12. 12. Ideation
  13. 13. Build campaigns that journalists want to write about
  14. 14. Story
  15. 15. Find multiple angles for coverage
  16. 16. Pitching
  17. 17. Write a headline-grabbing outreach email
  18. 18. Everyone in our outreach team interprets the role differently…
  19. 19. …with 7 nationalities in the group!
  20. 20. My interpretation comes from traditional PR – with a twist
  21. 21. We delivered personal PR for high-profile clients…
  22. 22. …managing their reputation on a daily basis
  23. 23. Each client would have different priorities
  24. 24. One day you’re promoting British shipping
  25. 25. The next, a hit Broadway musical!
  26. 26. How did we deliver results for clients?
  27. 27. Ideation
  28. 28. Understand your clients’ business
  29. 29. Story
  30. 30. Find stories your client can legitimately comment on
  31. 31. Pitching
  32. 32. Sell your client into the stories
  33. 33. How did this work in practice?
  34. 34. Ideation
  35. 35. In Personal PR, we researched our client’s industry thoroughly before launch…
  36. 36. …so we knew their business better than they did
  37. 37. Knowing the client’s past was important
  38. 38. But campaigns were often defined by the client
  39. 39. How did we sell this campaign?
  40. 40. In this campaign, we were selling the spokesperson
  41. 41. Maritime UK’s report into the industry’s contribution to UK economy
  42. 42. So that’s personal PR; what about Outreach?
  43. 43. In Outreach, we sell the story, NOT the spokesperson
  44. 44. So our campaigns help journalist tell interesting stories
  45. 45. Rather than researching the industry, we research the media landscape…
  46. 46. …and what journalists will write about
  47. 47. Journalists love stories that matter to ordinary people
  48. 48. What do Brits love complaining about?
  49. 49. If people love complaining about it, journalists will write about it!
  50. 50. This campaign for GoCompare reveals the vehicle brand with the worst driver reputation in the UK
  51. 51. We knew it would interest motoring journalists
  52. 52. This coverage has an added benefit
  53. 53. By making the client the source of the story…
  54. 54. …it helps build trust in the brand
  55. 55. But to build that trust…
  56. 56. …we need great stories that interest journalists
  57. 57. So that’s ideation…
  58. 58. Story
  59. 59. In Outreach, our campaigns often have many angles
  60. 60. This often leads to coverage in completely different sectors
  61. 61. OPRAH
  62. 62. My instinct?
  63. 63. Celebrity and Lifestyle
  64. 64. I was wrong…
  65. 65. Your first instinct won’t always lead to coverage
  66. 66. In Outreach, we can choose from many angles to get the most coverage
  67. 67. But in Personal PR, being reactive was key
  68. 68. Our client needed to be the first to react to a developing news story…
  69. 69. …so following the news cycle was essential
  70. 70. The Royal Navy’s new aircraft carrier arrives in Portsmouth Harbour - puts maritime at the top of the news agenda
  71. 71. We used the interest in this story for major coverage for Maritime UK
  72. 72. We contacted every national news desk
  73. 73. With relevant stories from the client’s report…
  74. 74. …and specific quotes from key people in the Maritime industry
  75. 75. The result?
  76. 76. But in Outreach, we need links
  77. 77. What if campaigns are slow to get links?
  78. 78. This campaign for Shutterfly illustrated what Americans would put in a time capsule
  79. 79. Unfortunately, it struggled for coverage
  80. 80. Interesting, but it doesn’t grab headlines
  81. 81. So…
  82. 82. We surveyed 1,000 US citizens to find out what they would put in a time capsule
  83. 83. Including their favourite movies of the decade
  84. 84. Tough sell
  85. 85. I mean, who’s going to want to write about Star Wars?
  86. 86. SCREENSHOTS
  87. 87. This would not have been possible in Personal PR
  88. 88. Because you can’t change your client
  89. 89. But in SEO, you’re selling the story
  90. 90. So you can change it up if you need to
  91. 91. Ok, that’s story…
  92. 92. Pitching
  93. 93. In Personal PR, the pitch target depended on the client
  94. 94. Journalists would often be aware of your client through their reputation
  95. 95. Especially if that client is already an authority on the issue
  96. 96. Our clients could get on the news…
  97. 97. …without having us sell them in
  98. 98. Our client, John Mills, got lots of natural coverage as a Labour supporter of Brexit
  99. 99. Our efforts then focused on preparing our client for these appearances
  100. 100. So they knew exactly what to say…
  101. 101. …and how to make the most of the opportunity
  102. 102. In Outreach, getting links starts with a direct email to journalists
  103. 103. But this can be daunting
  104. 104. However, when I started emailing journalists…
  105. 105. I remembered one simple piece of advice from PR…
  106. 106. “I’m going to shoot you in the face, and here’s why…”
  107. 107. Journalists get straight to the point, so should you
  108. 108. However, getting your client expert comment alongside a link is still possible in Outreach
  109. 109. I contacted the commentary desk as well as Fortune’s staff writers
  110. 110. Usually, a journalist will write the story and include a link
  111. 111. But Fortune asked me to write the editorial on behalf of AdView
  112. 112. Which meant I guaranteed myself a link
  113. 113. So this is how I pitch stories in Outreach
  114. 114. So let’s wrap this thing up…
  115. 115. How do traditional PR and Outreach differ?
  116. 116. In Outreach, we build campaigns by knowing what the media cover
  117. 117. We sell the story, not the spokesperson
  118. 118. Journalists would come to us about our clients
  119. 119. So we had to make sure our spokesperson was sending the right message
  120. 120. How are Personal PR and Outreach similar?
  121. 121. Get straight to the point, and know why the journalist wants the story
  122. 122. In Outreach, we trade on our ability to get links…
  123. 123. … and we give our clients interesting things to say to the world
  124. 124. They also enhance their brand…
  125. 125. …by making them the source of the story
  126. 126. It helps improve their reputation, just as we would have wanted in Personal PR
  127. 127. Good outreach campaigns get links…
  128. 128. …but the best?
  129. 129. They secure great links AND great media exposure
  130. 130. Get the right angles
  131. 131. And you’ll get the right links
  132. 132. Thank you!

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