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What's Next: Follow the Feeling

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This crash course in brand building gives tangible growth pathways based on research of 1,500 fast-growing brands from Alibaba to Zara, catalogued in the recently released book by Kai Wright: Follow the Feeling (August 2019).

Starting with behavioural economic principles and ending with a new systems-based approach to brand building, this session presents the listener with one metric that trumps the hundreds of data points entangling brand value: feelings.

Publicado en: Marketing
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What's Next: Follow the Feeling

  1. 1. What’s Next: Follow the Feeling
 Brand Building in a Noisy World Powered by
  2. 2. Welcome Dayoán Daumont Consulting Partner
 Ogilvy Consulting Kai Wright Consulting Partner Ogilvy Consulting
  3. 3. Tell us where you are dialing in from! What’s the weather like in your city?
  4. 4. Do you want this deck? It will be available for download shortly after the webinar on: slideshare.net/socialogilvy And the recording up on
  5. 5. FOLLOW FEELINGbrand building in a noisy world KAI D.WRIGHT the
  6. 6. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ C U R R E N T B R A N D & F E E L I N G F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 6
  7. 7. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  8. 8. www.kaidwright.com//@KAIWRIGHT # F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G
  9. 9. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  10. 10. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  11. 11. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ ?
  12. 12. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  13. 13. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  14. 14. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ W E A R E A L L H O M O E C O N O M I C U S . Originates in the 18th century from Adam Smith and David Ricardo: We are driven by reason. 1 We know what we want. 2 We can judge the utility (i.e., benefits) of our choice. 3 We can properly value our choices. 4 We behave selfishly, doing what is in our own best interest. 5 @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ 17
  15. 15. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  16. 16. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ M E D I U M Sender (encodes)I N O U TReceiver (decodes) Message (noise) Feedback R E C E P T I V I T Y M AT T E R S 20 Source: Adler and Towne, 1978.
  17. 17. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ Possible Event Triggers Scanning Perception Schema Production Appraisal Schema Evaluation Emotion Schema Database Behavior Emotional Responding Cognition Physiology Subjective Experience Expressive Behavior MATCH NO MATCH Source: David Matsumoto, The Origin of Universal Human Emotion
  18. 18. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ C O M M U N I CAT I O N A S A “ SYS T E M ” Para-linguistics How we express and deliver it tone, modulation, pauses F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ Verbal What we say words Non-verbal What it looks and sounds like sounds, visuals, gestures @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 7% 55% 38% 22
  19. 19. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  20. 20. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  21. 21. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ 25
  22. 22. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ B E H A V I N G P R E D I C T A B L Y In theory, based on “standard” homo economicus: We are driven by reason. We know what we want. We can judge the utility (i.e., benefits) of our choice. We can properly value our choices. We behave selfishly, doing what is in our own best interest. , 26 I R R A T I O N A L
  23. 23. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ – DANIEL KAHNEMAN Mental effort, I would argue, is relatively rare. Most of the time we coast.“ ” 27
  24. 24. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ Over 95% of our decisions are made in “auto-pilot” with emotions influencing nearly 70% of our decisions. 28
  25. 25. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ “ ”29
  26. 26. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ Source: Russell and Mehrabian, 1974.
  27. 27. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ Source: Plutchik, 1980.
  28. 28. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ Source: Russell and Mehrabian, 1974.
  29. 29. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  30. 30. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  31. 31. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ 1,500 fast-growing companies (2015 - 2018) from Alibaba to Zara.
  32. 32. www.kaidwright.com//@KAIWRIGHT # F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G Just Released fast-growing companies (2015 - 2018) from Alibaba to Zara.
  33. 33. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ LEXICON TRIGGERS VISUAL STIMULI EXPERIENCE DRIVERS CULTURAL CONNECTIONS AUDIO CUES 37 FINDING TRUE NORTHL.A.V.E.C. // CLAVE (A MAGIC KEY)
  34. 34. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ Mental structures that organize the information we consume - both actively and passively. Taxonomy Identity Appeals Associations Vocabulary Triggers LEXICON Four legs Stripes Eats Grass ZEBRA 38
  35. 35. how we evoke recall semantics how we remember categories @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ what we remember associations
  36. 36. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ Source: Readable
  37. 37. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ Vocabulary size (no. lemmas) % of content in OEC Example lemmas 10 25% the, of, and, to, that, have 100 50% from, because, go, me, our, well, way 1000 75% girl, win, decide, huge, difficult, series 7000 90% tackle, peak, crude, purely, dude, modest 50,000 95% saboteur, autocracy, calyx, conformist >1,000,000 99% laggardly, endobenthic, pomological Source: Oxford Dictionary LEXICON Inside the Feelings Zone
  38. 38. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ B R A N D E D VO CA B U L A RY F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 42 LEXICON
  39. 39. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ LEXICON
  40. 40. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ LEXICON
  41. 41. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ AUDIO CUES An audio cue or tone, effective in marketing and communication when used repetitiously to reinforce behavior or recall: mood atmospherics sonic signatures usability cues behavior triggers mnemonics MOST RECOGNIZABLE TRADEMARKED SOUNDS 45
  42. 42. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ AUDIO CUES
  43. 43. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ B I R D B OX T E S T F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 47 AUDIO CUES
  44. 44. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ 1 2 3 5 4 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  45. 45. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  46. 46. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ behavioral reminders ambient brand triggers mnemonics (i.e., memory aids) usability cues SONIC BRANDING LOW-HANGING FRUIT AUDIO CUES 50 AUDIENCE
  47. 47. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ VISUAL STIMULI 51 Something that stands for or represents something else (e.g., an ideal). Symbols Shapes Colors Signs Memes Gifs Emojis Images Video
  48. 48. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ BRAND SIGNATURE SYMBOL FONT SHAPE COLOR
  49. 49. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  50. 50. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  51. 51. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  52. 52. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ Tiffany Blue 1 T-Mobile Magenta 2 Barbie Pink 3 UPS Pullman Brown 4 3M Canary Yellow 5 Cadbury Purple 6
  53. 53. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  54. 54. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ McDonald’s Christian Cross
  55. 55. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ 59 VISUAL STIMULI 2019
  56. 56. F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018
  57. 57. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  58. 58. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ H O U S E PA R T Y F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 62 VISUAL STIMULI
  59. 59. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  60. 60. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  61. 61. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  62. 62. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  63. 63. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  64. 64. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  65. 65. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  66. 66. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  67. 67. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ VISUAL STIMULI
  68. 68. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ VISUAL STIMULI
  69. 69. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  70. 70. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ VISUAL STIMULI
  71. 71. F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 75
  72. 72. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ Atmosphere for interacting with a brand through physical and/or digital channels, creating a “customer-centric system.” Closed Feedback Loops Choice Architecture User Experience Proximity Cues Dialogue EXPERIENCE 76
  73. 73. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ EXPERIENCE
  74. 74. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ EXPERIENCE
  75. 75. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ EXPERIENCE
  76. 76. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ N O R M AT I V E B E H AV I O R F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 80 EXPERIENCE
  77. 77. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  78. 78. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ C LO S E T H E F E E D BAC K LO O P F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 82 EXPERIENCE
  79. 79. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ EXPERIENCE
  80. 80. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ EXPERIENCE
  81. 81. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ EXPERIENCE
  82. 82. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ CULTURE Principles and standards of behavior that govern judgement and operations for people, groups and institutions (e.g., governments): Values Purpose Practices Policies Protocols 86
  83. 83. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ CULTURE
  84. 84. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ CULTURE EMPOWERMENT EMPATHY EARNEST
  85. 85. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ 89 LEXICON TRIGGERS Building a tribe branded vocabulary tribe appeals VISUAL STIMULI Becoming a conversation brand symbols & shapes rich media glyphs EXPERIENCE DRIVERS creating a “system” with a closed feedback loop normative behavior feedback CULTURAL CONNECTIONS Aligning thoughts & action practices & policies purpose AUDIO CUES Developing instant recognition sonic signatures atmospherics
  86. 86. www.kaidwright.com//@KAIWRIGHT # F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G Just Released
  87. 87. Questions?
  88. 88. Thank you.
  89. 89. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  90. 90. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  91. 91. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  92. 92. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ Tribe Individual Machine & Artificial Intelligence Human-to-Human
  93. 93. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  94. 94. the K A I D . W R I G H T F O L L O W F E E L I N G
  95. 95. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  96. 96. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  97. 97. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  98. 98. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ 40 Issue 4 - 2014 ©LONDON BusINess sCHOOL w w w.london.edu/bsr ©LONDON BusINess sCHOOL Issue 4 - 2014 41w w w.london.edu/bsr PHOTOGRAPHsHutterstOCk H owdoyoumeasure emotions in the overallexperience of customers? Wouldthismeasurecontribute toyourbottom-line?Isitpossible toestimatethebusinessgenerated by, for example, a new positive emotionatacertainstageofthe customerjourneyor,conversely, when suppressing a particular negative emotion? Emotions have become increasingly important in marketing,fuelledbybookssuch as Lovemarks (Kevin Roberts, 2005), The DNA of Customer Experience (Colin Shaw, 2007) and Emotionomics (Dave Hill, 2010).Sometopresearcherson management have studied the so-called‘experienceeconomy’ and the importance of creating emotionalbondswithcustomers. Fromfieldsasdiverseasneuro- science,experimentalpsychology and behavioural economics, the theoretical basis proving that emotions are key when customers make decisions is increasingly established. The reality is that emotions createvalueforcompanies,and resourcesshouldbeearmarked for understanding, measuring or managing them. Loyal practice Inmanycompanies,measuring customers’emotionsregarding their experience is embedded intheparametersthatmeasure loyalty or satisfaction. Often, companies attempt to quantify satisfaction or loyalty without including emotional variables intheequation.Tofurtherconfuse the picture, recent advances in marketingsciencearebeginning toshow that levels of customer loyalty or satisfaction do not necessarily predict future behaviour, such as recommendingrepurchasingor upselling the product. In particular, it is assumed that the NPS (Net Promoter Score),awidespreadparameter measuring loyalty, faithfully embraces the emotions that customersfeelateachphaseof the customer journey. NPS originated with a 2003 Harvard Business Review article by FrederickReichheld–‘TheOne Number You Need to Grow’. It isameasureofthepercentageof customerswhoarepromotersof abrandnameorcompany,minus the percentage of detractors. Thisletsorganisationsmeasure and manage customer loyalty. This indicator has gained popularity over the years: it is simple to obtain, easy to interpretandexplainandoffers abenchmarkwithcompanies and sectors in relation to levels of loyalty. But it has, at times, attracted controversy. Several pieces of research have questioned its suitability as a parameter to be used by companies. One, published in 2007intheJournalofMarketing, argued that NPS is a poor indicator to predict the growth of a company. Meanwhile, scientific evidence is overwhelming regardingtheroleofemotionsin decision-making.Itconcludes: are not directly related to decision-making – may have a significant impact on the opinion or final decisions innate or experimentally induced, may degrade the quality of decision-making. models of decision-making improve their explanatory power tremendously. Most recently, Daniel Kahneman, a Nobel prize- winningpioneerinbehavioural economics,publishedhisbest- selling Thinking, Fast and Slow (2010).Hetheorisesonthetwo systemsbywhichthemindworks, showingtheroleemotionsplay inmostdailydecisions.System oneisfast,automatic,frequent, emotional and unconscious, while system two is slow, vigorous, uncommon, logical, scheming and conscious. Despite the fact that no one questions the enormous influence of emotions in customer decisions, a standard measure is missing:onethattakes intoaccountemotions and,atthesametime, hasahighpredictive power on customers’ future behaviour. In ordertofillthisgap,EMO Insights International developed its EMO Index (see box), which summarises the emotional state of single or groups of customers towards a company(ona-100to+100scale), depending on the strength of measured, together with the possiblereasonsthatmayhave causedthem(emotionaltriggers). Customer classification To understand how this indicatorisbuilt,imagineasteel yardinwhichthetwoemotional dimensions,positiveandnegative, counterbalance each other, leaningthecustomer’semotional balance and, therefore, their EMOIndex,towardthepositive ornegativeside.Customersare then classified, depending on theemotionalprintduringtheir experienceswiththecompany, into Fans, Believers, Followers, Standby,LostSouls,Burned-out and Opponents. Thenanewparadigm,called emotional segmentation is introduced based on this classificationofcustomers.This tiesinwiththepowerofemotions on the future behaviour of customers, as opposed to the traditionaltypeofsegmentation which tends to use customers’ socio-demographic variables (sex, age, social class, et al), or classificationparameterslinked to a specific sector (purchased product, purchase volume, during the period between the two pieces of research. This established a correlation between the emotional segmentation in the first wave and the subsequent behaviour of customers. In addition, a comparison was made against the predictive power of the segmentation used by the NPS parameter:promoters,neutrals or passives and detractors. One comparison between the two approaches looked at a specific behaviour essential to the retail-banking sector: recommendation.Theaimwas to compare both approaches according to their capacity to predict the percentage of customers that truly advised relatives/acquaintances to becomecustomersoftheirmain bank(positiverecommendation); andthepercentageofcustomers who advised relatives/friends not to become a customer (negative recommendation). The objective was to use emotional segmentation to predict the real behaviour of customers. It also served to verify the benefit of this new paradigm compared with traditionalapproachesofloyalty and satisfaction measuring. The difference observed amongthedetractorsidentified bytheNPSapproach,comparedto thoseidentifiedbytheemotional approach,isnoteworthy.TheNPS- identified detractors actually recommended their bank positivelytoagreaterextentthan negatively. In contrast, those identified as opponents overwhelmingly gave negative recommendations of their banks. Again,thissuggeststhat emotions provide greater predictive power. Although these insights confirm the initial hypotheses, they are only applicable to a specific sector(retailbanking), andtheyhaveonlybeenstudied in a single country. However, they do establish an empiric testofsomethingthatintuitively seems very logical: including emotionswhenmeasuringand segmentingisastepcompanies should begin to take, since it is likelythattheycanincreasethe explanatoryandpredictivepower of customers’ behaviours. This approach will add significant valueincomparisonwithmore traditional and simplistic classification approaches. Once empirical science has taken major steps towards demonstrating that measuring emotions is not only possible, butalsoimportant,inpredicting behaviours, it is time for managementtotakeadvantage of these breakthroughs. The corporateworldshould embrace customer emotion analysis, as enough evidence supports its prediction power, and hence its impact on companies’ bottomlines.Welcometoanew era of management. Elena Alfaro (ealfaro@emo insights.com)isCEOandapartner at EMO Insights. Santiago Urio (surio@emoinsights.com) is a senior business advisor and partneratEMOInsights.Hehas anMBAfromLondonBusiness School.GonzaloMartín-Vivaldi (gmvivaldi@emoinsights.com) is COO and a partner at EMO Insights,andaProfessoratESIC Business School positiveandnegativeemotions feltbycustomersbasedontheir last experiences. To calculate the EMO Index, first extensive analysis is performedtodeterminewhich emotions are relevant for the given sector (for example, surprise, happiness, irritation, disappointment, etc). Then a representative sample of customersisselectedandasked if they have felt each of these emotionsatanyparticulartime in the interaction with the company, based on their customerexperiencememories. Emotion levels are also purchase reasons, et al). The big question is the predictivepower–orotherwise –ofthisnewsegmentationwith regard to customers’ future behaviour. Does the index increase predictive power in comparison with other measurements, such as NPS? To test it, EMO carried out a study in the retail-banking sectorinSpain.Itwasperformed for the first time in 2011 (with 1,968interviews).Asecondwave was carried out in 2013 (3,102 interviews).Duringthesecond wave there was analysis of the real behaviour of customers BURNED- OUT LOST SOULS STAND BY FOLLOWERS BELIEVERS FANS Emotional link to the company- + OPPONENTS -100 -30 -5 +15 THE EMO INDEX +30 +55 +80 +100 Measuring emotions is not only possible, but also important, in predicting behaviours Emotions are a better predictor of whether customers will return than conventional loyalty measures. Elena Alfaro, Santiago Urío and Gonzalo Martín-Vivaldi argue for an emotional standard An emotional business
  99. 99. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™
  100. 100. the K A I D . W R I G H T F O L L O W F E E L I N G
  101. 101. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ LEXICON whimsical tone of voice VISUAL STIMULI castle, ears, sparkles EXPERIENCE global, accommodating CULTURE “family” co- marketing deals Feeling: Happiness AUDIO CUES fireworks, harps, chimes 105
  102. 102. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ LEXICON motivational, “fuel” VISUAL STIMULI neon-colored drinks, orange EXPERIENCE youth sports training, 360 (pre- during, post) CULTURE victory, celebration AUDIO CUES uplifting, uptempo Feeling: Endurance 106
  103. 103. @KAIWRIGHT//©KDWRIGHT.2018 F O L L O W T H E F E E L I N G ™ LEXICON minimalistic, English/Spanish VISUAL STIMULI lime, beach, sand EXPERIENCE beach balls, streamers CULTURE relaxed, personable, conversational AUDIO CUES pelicans, ocean waves Feeling: Relaxation 107
  104. 104. the K A I D . W R I G H T F O L L O W F E E L I N G

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